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Telmo Rodriguez Rioja las Beatas 2013

Winemaker's Notes:

98 points Luis Gutierrez (Wine Advocate): The real test for the newish top cuvée was to see its behavior in a more challenging vintage. I had tasted the 2013 Las Beatas from the oak vat in my previous visit and didn't find it that bad. The field blend of this old terraced vineyard includes Tempranillo, Graciano, Garnacha, Garnacha Blanca and other grapes, as it was the norm in the old times. It fermented in 1,000- and 3,000-liter oak vats and matured in 1,200-liter oak foudres in an old cellar, located in the village of Ollauri, following the strictest tradition for some 15 months. The nose reminded me of wet chalk straight away, a fine and subtle minerality, slowly opening up to aromas of violets and lavender. It had hints of pollen and honey wax, perfumed but in a subtle way. It is perhaps a little more austere and reticent than previous vintages that were warmer and drier. There is a big difference in the acidity that provides for an effervescent texture, with a terse sensation, with tension and a tasty finish with notes of acid berries. This feels like a real triumph over the conditions of the vintage, and a year that should evolve nicely in bottle. This is a scarce wine, with some 1,500 bottles filled in April 2015. We also did a mini-vertical from 2011 to 2014 to follow up on the evolution, comparing the four different vintages bottled until now. They are evolving at a glacial pace; the four vintages show different, but there is a common character. 2014 is obviously too young (it was bottled a few weeks before I tasted it) and it has the puppy fat covering the chalky tannins, and seems more in line with the 2011, while the 2013 feels closer to 2012. Drink: 2015-2031. (6/25/16)

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Compañía de Vinos Telmo Rodríguez S.L.:
In 1994, Pablo Eguzkiza and Telmo Rodríguez, along with a third oenologist, created a Garnacha from old bush vineyards in Navarra. The wine was called Alma (soul). This is how the business started, originally under the name of Compañía de Vinos de La Granja. The name was a declaration of intent: it made it clear that the company would be producing more wines in the future and contained a homag... Read more
In 1994, Pablo Eguzkiza and Telmo Rodríguez, along with a third oenologist, created a Garnacha from old bush vineyards in Navarra. The wine was called Alma (soul). This is how the business started, originally under the name of Compañía de Vinos de La Granja. The name was a declaration of intent: it made it clear that the company would be producing more wines in the future and contained a homage to La Granja, the famous glassworks, a centre of outstanding Spanish craftwork that has all but disappeared. Read less

98 points Luis Gutierrez (Wine Advocate): The real test for the newish top cuvée was to see its behavior in a more challenging vintage. I had tasted the 2013 Las Beatas from the oak vat in my previous visit and didn't find it that bad. The field blend of this old terraced vineyard includes Tempranillo, Graciano, Garnacha, Garnacha Blanca and other grapes, as it was the norm in the old times. It fermented in 1,000- and 3,000-liter oak vats and matured in 1,200-liter oak foudres in an old cellar, located in the village of Ollauri, following the strictest tradition for some 15 months. The nose reminded me of wet chalk straight away, a fine and subtle minerality, slowly opening up to aromas of violets and lavender. It had hints of pollen and honey wax, perfumed but in a subtle way. It is perhaps a little more austere and reticent than previous vintages that were warmer and drier. There is a big difference in the acidity that provides for an effervescent texture, with a terse sensation, with tension and a tasty finish with notes of acid berries. This feels like a real triumph over the conditions of the vintage, and a year that should evolve nicely in bottle. This is a scarce wine, with some 1,500 bottles filled in April 2015. We also did a mini-vertical from 2011 to 2014 to follow up on the evolution, comparing the four different vintages bottled until now. They are evolving at a glacial pace; the four vintages show different, but there is a common character. 2014 is obviously too young (it was bottled a few weeks before I tasted it) and it has the puppy fat covering the chalky tannins, and seems more in line with the 2011, while the 2013 feels closer to 2012. Drink: 2015-2031. (6/25/16)

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