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Vineshop24 EUR 185.00 750ml
USD $
Saratoga Wine Exchange USD 218.84 750ml

Pavillon Rouge Du Chateau Margaux 2010

Winemaker's Notes:

"The 2010 Ermitage Le Pavillon has a black purple color to the rim and an extraordinary nose of spring flowers, blueberry and blackberry liqueur, lead pencil shavings, pen ink as well as hints of licorice and truffle. Great texture, amazing richness and off-the-charts extract levels make this a true connoisseur’s wine for those with patience...98-100" WA 12/11 "Vivid purple. Pungent, intensely perfumed bouquet displays black and blue fruits, violet, Moroccan spices and a hint of rooty sassafras. Sweet and lush on entry, then bright and intense in the middle, offering powerful blackberry and boysenberry flavors and suggestions of bitter chocolate and cola. Finishes juicy and very long, with outstanding energy and notes of allspice and candied dark berries...94-96" IWC 3/12

Château Margaux:
Château Margaux was one of the first four estates to be named a First Growth (Premier or 1er Cru Classé) in the Bordeaux Classification of 1855, and continues to be one of the most prestigious wines in all of France. The estate, then known as “La Mothe de Margaux,” was founded in the early 12th century on the left bank of the Garonne estuary in the Médoc. In 11... Read more
Château Margaux was one of the first four estates to be named a First Growth (Premier or 1er Cru Classé) in the Bordeaux Classification of 1855, and continues to be one of the most prestigious wines in all of France. The estate, then known as “La Mothe de Margaux,” was founded in the early 12th century on the left bank of the Garonne estuary in the Médoc. In 1152, Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henry Plantagenet, the future Henry II of England, which made Aquitaine (Bordeaux and environs) English property until the end of the 100 Years War in 1453. For over a couple of centuries, this ensured the sale and trade of Bordeaux wines, Margaux included, to the English market. The royal family and assorted English nobility became huge fans as a result. In the 1570s, Pierre de Lestonnac overhauled the estate and vineyards, clearing grain in favor of grapevines, and propelled the future success of the wines. By the beginning of the 18th century, there were some 265 hectares under vine, which is roughly what it still is today. This was also when the estate manager, only known as “Berlon,” established the practice of vinifying red and white grapes separately, as well as waiting till later in the day to pick grapes so they wouldn’t be covered in dew and rot as easily as they waited for production. The last part of the 18th century was a boom for Margaux. The 1771 vintage was the first Bordeaux to be sold at Christie’s. In 1787, Thomas Jefferson counted it among vineyards of the “first quality.” But not unlike other properties in this part of France, and despite its classification in 1855, Margaux suffered during the years of the Revolution, downy mildew and phylloxera. By 1893, it had regained its former glory with one of the most successful vintages of the 19th century. The estate went through a cycle of many owners over the next century. The 1970s were a particularly bad time under the Ginestets as much of the world was in a recession and three successive vintages - 1972, 1973 and 1974 - were deemed unsaleable (it was, incidentally, the Ginestets who had the bright idea to declare vintages only in “good” harvest years in the first place). Ownership was finally overturned to André Mentzelopoulos in 1977, who invested in the vineyards, reinstated the second wines of Pavillon Rouge and Pavillon Blanc, and renovated the estate. Even though he was only in control for a couple of years until his death in 1980, his tireless efforts paved the way for the great successes of the subsequent decades, starting in the early 1980s. 1982 in particular was the vintage when international investors really took note of both the Château Margaux and Pavillons, and when critics such as Robert Parker began promoting the “Bordeaux Futures” frenzy with Margaux as one of the top estates. This new tradition has persevered into present day as these wines continue to please palates, command huge auction returns and take coveted positions in cellars throughout the world.  Read less

External Reviews for Pavillon Rouge Du Chateau Margaux

External Review
Source: Premium Wine & Spirits
01/13/2015

Liquid velvet, with stunning length and a caressing mouthfeel, as layers of creamed plum, blackberry coulis and steeped black currant fruit glides along, seamlessly intertwined with black tea, mulled blood orange, incense and lilac. Hints of mesquite and alder hang subtly in the background, and the structure, evident and massive, has melded wonderfully. —Non-blind Château Margaux vertical (December 2013). Best from 2018 through 2040.


External Review
Source: JJ Buckley Fine Wines
07/13/2011

90% cabernet sauvignon, 7% merlot, 1.5% cabernet franc, and 1.5% petit verdot. Super perfumed aromas of crushed violet, black cherry, blackberry liquor and crushed rock flourish on the nose, trailed by vanilla and kirsch. The palate exhibits more bla... Alex Lallos. A Bordeaux Blend wine from Bordeaux in France. 2010 Margaux, Chateau 1500ml


External Review
Source: Prestige Wine & Spirits
03/26/2013

The 2010 is a brilliant Chateau Margaux, as one might expect in this vintage. The percentage of Cabernet Sauvignon in the final blend hit 90%, the balance Merlot and Cabernet Franc, and only 38% of the crop made it into the Chateau Margaux. Paul Pontallier, the administrator, told me that this wine has even higher levels of tannin than some other extraordinary vintages such as 2005, 2000, 1996, etc. Deep purple, pure and intense, with floral notes, tremendous opulence and palate presence, this is a wine of considerable nobility. With loads of blueberry, black currant and violet-infused fruit and a heady alcohol level above 13.5% (although that looks modest compared to several other first growths, particularly Chateau Latour and Chateau Haut-Brion), its beautifully sweet texture, ripe tannin, abundant depth and profound finish all make for another near-perfect wine that should age effortlessly for 30–40 years.


External Review
Source: Prestige Wine & Spirits
03/26/2013

A mouthwatering tobacco leaf note leads the way, quickly followed by steeped black currant and fig fruit, with dark tar and ganache on the back end. Roasted alder and juniper hints hang in the background. Extremely backward, with a firm, tannic structure, this is girded for the long haul. Judging from the finely beaded acidity and lilting echo of lilac that peeks in now, this should acquire sensational aromatics and incredible grace with age. Best from 2018 through 2040.


External Review
Source: Prestige Wine & Spirits
10/28/2013

A great wine that is just starting out. The high proportion of Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend gives the structured, black currant character. Dark chocolate and layers of wood are forward, revealing how young the wine is. And then the fruit, so rich and powerful, brings deliciousness to the firm, dense structure. Age for many years.


External Review
Source: JJ Buckley Fine Wines
09/17/2014

Saturated ruby-red. Deep aromas of blackberry licorice and bitter chocolate complicated by nuances of loam and coffee extract. Dense thick and sweet but with harmonious acidity giving shape and lift to the pungent cassis spice and tobacco flavors. Youthfully chewy wine with terrific underlying structure and a very long sappy finish featuring broad tannins and a hint of licorice. This has improved considerably since the Primeurs but I still think the 2009 Margaux is the superior wine.


External Review
Source: JJ Buckley Fine Wines
11/14/2013

90% cabernet sauvignon 7% merlot 1.5% cabernet franc and 1.5% petit verdot. Super perfumed aromas of crushed violet black cherry blackberry liquor and crushed rock flourish on the nose trailed by vanilla and kirsch. The palate exhibits more blackberry and cassis along with chocolate and exotic Asian spice. This shows amazing purity and elegance for a wine of such concentration and power and comes across as silky smooth thanks to the fine grained tannins. 13.5% alcohol. This is Margaux a pure expression and an absolutely stunning wine! Better than 2009 and perhaps one of the best ever. Tasted at Chateau Margaux. Alex Lallos.


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"The 2010 Ermitage Le Pavillon has a black purple color to the rim and an extraordinary nose of spring flowers, blueberry and blackberry liqueur, lead pencil shavings, pen ink as well as hints of licorice and truffle. Great texture, amazing richness and off-the-charts extract levels make this a true connoisseur’s wine for those with patience...98-100" WA 12/11 "Vivid purple. Pungent, intensely perfumed bouquet displays black and blue fruits, violet, Moroccan spices and a hint of rooty sassafras. Sweet and lush on entry, then bright and intense in the middle, offering powerful blackberry and boysenberry flavors and suggestions of bitter chocolate and cola. Finishes juicy and very long, with outstanding energy and notes of allspice and candied dark berries...94-96" IWC 3/12

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