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Pauillac de Chateau Latour 2010

Winemaker's Notes:

93 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate: The best Pauillac I ever tasted (and this wine has been a revelation ever since they first introduced it), the 2010 from Latour represents 24% of their production. It is a blend of 55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 44.5% Merlot and .5% Cabernet Franc. An amazingly opulent, round, delicious wine, and a great buy when they finally release it – assuming it comes in under a three-digit price – it possesses wonderfully silky tannins, classic black currant, cedar wood and forest floor notes, and rich, full-bodied opulence as well as a terrific purity and palate presence. It should drink well for 10-15+ years.” 2/13 94 Points, Zachys Buying Team: “Tasted three times. This difficult to find third wine of Château Latour is one of the most exciting little finds from Pauillac. In addition to offering a taste of the historic château, it is a wine that can challenge some neighboring cru classé. We recommend letting this wine breathe two hours and that Pauillac structure will open. On the nose, it screams red berry fruits, licorice, and a chalky minerality. With patience, the wine on the palate gains in weight and becomes expansive. It’s a mouthful of cherry, cassis, tea, savory minerality with herbaceous undertones. While medium-full bodied, it is light on its fight and has striking acidity and minerality to balance the fruit and structure. This is old-school Bordeaux and wears characteristics of the 98-point 2010 vintage. At almost seven years of age, it is juicy and delicious now, but will age another seven plus years. Decant or let it breathe, serve at cellar temperature and enjoy a taste of First Growth royalty.” 92 Points, James Suckling: "A wine with berry, chocolate and spice character. Full body, with velvety tannins and a savory finish. It shows currant and berry. I love the texture to this. Third wine of first growth Latour. Drink or hold.” 2/13 17/20 Points, Jancis Robinson: “55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Merlot with a drop of Cabernet Franc. 24% of production. 22% press wine. Not released en primeur. Aimed at restaurants. ‘This wine should be drunk and peed within six months of release,’ is Frédéric Engerer’s less-than-elegant way of describing the market positioning of this wine. He will release the 2006 this year – to quite a few merchants in the UK. It is not sold en primeur. Very deep crimson. Much more Merlot than the other cuvées here. Immediately very dry and subtle after all the southern Médocs and St-Juliens I have just been tasting. Minerals immediately. And then so round and luscious on the palate even in this supposedly (relatively) lowly third wine. Very well-managed tannins – how do they do it? Some reduction. Always last to be drawn because the grand vin is blended first.” 4/11

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Louis Latour:
The Latours have been vintners in Burgundy since the 17th century, slowly building a unique Domaine of 125 acres. Maison Louis Latour currently has the largest Grand Cru property in all of the Cote d’Or with a total of 71.58 acres. The vineyards extend from Chambertin in the north to Chevalier-Montrachet in the south and are solely planted with the two noble grape varieties: Pinot Noir... Read more
The Latours have been vintners in Burgundy since the 17th century, slowly building a unique Domaine of 125 acres. Maison Louis Latour currently has the largest Grand Cru property in all of the Cote d’Or with a total of 71.58 acres. The vineyards extend from Chambertin in the north to Chevalier-Montrachet in the south and are solely planted with the two noble grape varieties: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. All of the grapes from the vineyards we own are vinified and aged in the attractive cuverie of Château Corton Grancey in Aloxe-Corton. The winery was the first purpose-built cuverie in France and remains the oldest still-functioning. A unique rail-way system with elevators allows the entire wine-making process to be achieved by the use of gravity. This eliminates the threat of oxidation from unnecessary pumping of the must. Since 1985, Louis Latour has been selling the wines from its own vineyards under the name Domaine Louis Latour. The Latour family founded the ‘Maison de négoce’, an important shipping company, in 1797, and it is still based at 18 Rue des Tonneliers in Beaune to this day. The company is unique in Burgundy in that it is still family-owned and family-run, having been passed down from father to son for over ten generations. To celebrate our Bicentenary in 1797, we published a commemorative book and were admitted into the exclusive club of the Hénokiens. This club only accepts companies that are leaders in their respective fields, remain family owned, have a history of 200 years’ experience and still bear the name of their founder. There are only approximately 30 of these companies in the world. Maison Louis Latour ships its wines to over 60 countries worldwide. These world-class Chardonnays and Pinot Noirs can be found on the most famous dining tables around the globe. Read less

93 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate: The best Pauillac I ever tasted (and this wine has been a revelation ever since they first introduced it), the 2010 from Latour represents 24% of their production. It is a blend of 55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 44.5% Merlot and .5% Cabernet Franc. An amazingly opulent, round, delicious wine, and a great buy when they finally release it – assuming it comes in under a three-digit price – it possesses wonderfully silky tannins, classic black currant, cedar wood and forest floor notes, and rich, full-bodied opulence as well as a terrific purity and palate presence. It should drink well for 10-15+ years.” 2/13 94 Points, Zachys Buying Team: “Tasted three times. This difficult to find third wine of Château Latour is one of the most exciting little finds from Pauillac. In addition to offering a taste of the historic château, it is a wine that can challenge some neighboring cru classé. We recommend letting this wine breathe two hours and that Pauillac structure will open. On the nose, it screams red berry fruits, licorice, and a chalky minerality. With patience, the wine on the palate gains in weight and becomes expansive. It’s a mouthful of cherry, cassis, tea, savory minerality with herbaceous undertones. While medium-full bodied, it is light on its fight and has striking acidity and minerality to balance the fruit and structure. This is old-school Bordeaux and wears characteristics of the 98-point 2010 vintage. At almost seven years of age, it is juicy and delicious now, but will age another seven plus years. Decant or let it breathe, serve at cellar temperature and enjoy a taste of First Growth royalty.” 92 Points, James Suckling: "A wine with berry, chocolate and spice character. Full body, with velvety tannins and a savory finish. It shows currant and berry. I love the texture to this. Third wine of first growth Latour. Drink or hold.” 2/13 17/20 Points, Jancis Robinson: “55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Merlot with a drop of Cabernet Franc. 24% of production. 22% press wine. Not released en primeur. Aimed at restaurants. ‘This wine should be drunk and peed within six months of release,’ is Frédéric Engerer’s less-than-elegant way of describing the market positioning of this wine. He will release the 2006 this year – to quite a few merchants in the UK. It is not sold en primeur. Very deep crimson. Much more Merlot than the other cuvées here. Immediately very dry and subtle after all the southern Médocs and St-Juliens I have just been tasting. Minerals immediately. And then so round and luscious on the palate even in this supposedly (relatively) lowly third wine. Very well-managed tannins – how do they do it? Some reduction. Always last to be drawn because the grand vin is blended first.” 4/11

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