Les Cretes Vallee d'Aoste 2006

Winemaker's Notes:

The vine has been cultivated in the Aosta Valley since the Roman period or perhaps even earlier, if various legends can be believed. According to those stories, the Salassi, who lived in the region before the Romans conquered it because of its strategic value, were already making wines from grapes grown in their own vineyards. It is known with certainty that in 23 BC the Roman legions crushed a rebellion by the valley's inhabitants and celebrated their victory by looting all the cellars of their wine. It was during the Middle Ages, however, that the wines of the Aosta Valley established a widespread reputation. And they acquired something of a “sacral” character as well because, according to numerous reports, they were used in the rite of exorcism. The physical layout of the valley favours the cultivation of vines because the mountains tend to block or turn aside the coldest winds, thereby creating suitable microclimates in which grapes have flourished since the remotest times. In the second half of the 19th century, the phylloxera epidemic devastated the Aosta Valley vineyards over a period of many years. Fortunately, although the devastation was enormous, destruction was not total. The vineyards slowly revived and flourished anew. The only lasting setback was the disappearance of several vine varieties. Donnaz was the valley's first DOC wine, receiving that recognition in 1971. The following year, it was the turn of Enfer d'Arvier. Although other wines were in line and qualified to receive the DOC designation, all further movement was halted until 1985 while a plan was worked out to place all regional wines of fine quality under the common denomination of Valle d'Aosta. Costantino Charrère is the driving force in the region. In the manner of Robert Plageoles he is the archivist and grape detective, seeking out native grape varieties on the verge of extinction and preserving their peculiar qualities in a host of wonderful wines made at his family winery and the famous Les Cretes venture that he runs in partnership with other well known figures from the region.

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Domaine des Crêtes:
The vines grow in a variety of soils; this is what makes Brondel wines so original. The estate wines are regularly awarded medals in French wine competitions and mentioned in the Guide Hachette. Both our vatrooms, the first in a 19th century building and the second, which was built in 1999, are equipped for making wine using the latest vinification techniques. The Domaine des Crêtes wines are m... Read more
The vines grow in a variety of soils; this is what makes Brondel wines so original. The estate wines are regularly awarded medals in French wine competitions and mentioned in the Guide Hachette. Both our vatrooms, the first in a 19th century building and the second, which was built in 1999, are equipped for making wine using the latest vinification techniques. The Domaine des Crêtes wines are made using grapes from vines that have been certified for integrated vinegrowing since 2005, using the Terra Vitis guidelines with tracability checks carried out by an independent organisation. Through this Jean-François BRONDEL is confirming what he has always done since he started out; respected the flora, fauna and the ecosystem. His son Sylvain agrees this made of work and decides to participle at the family’s wine. Brondel winegrowers work on 11 hectares in all, of which 10 are for the red and rosé wine , so this is the gamay grape variety, and 1 hectare is for white wine and Crémant de Bourgogne, which is the chardonnay grape variety. This grape variety produces a high quality wine planted on chalky soil exposed to the east. All the wines are produced on the estate with the latest vinification techniques in a state of the art winery (thermo regulation system, modern press and conveying system). Read less

Member Reviews for Les Cretes Vallee d'Aoste

Add your review
Snooth User: Adam Levin
772801,757
3.50 5
08/10/2009

Bright cherry red in glass. Lots of cranberry and wild herbs on nose. Very forward. Tasted slightly bubbly, but that may have been the acid. On the palate, it reminded me of a simple, fruity pinot with lots of delicious acidity. Serve slightly chilled. Perfect for a summer night after a hot day.


Snooth User: Eric Guido
92549169,364
3.50 5
10/16/2010

The 2006 Torrette is stunning in the glass with a deep vibrant red color and a nose of ginger cookie, violets, cracked pepper and red fruit. On the palate, I found soft raspberry flavors that were juicy yet turned slightly bitter toward the finish and left me with a flavor of toasty rue. This was a very unique wine and highly enjoyable.


Snooth User: Eric Guido
92549169,364
3.00 5
09/25/2011

The Les Cretes Torrette showed floral notes with fresh turned soil, cherry and mushrooms. On the palate, it was soft with sweet red fruits, earth and dried floral notes. It glided effortlessly across the palate with an old world and with a slightly aged resolve. The finish was fresh and begged you to take another sip. A completely different performance from my first bottle, yet still just as enjoyable. I will seek this out again.



The vine has been cultivated in the Aosta Valley since the Roman period or perhaps even earlier, if various legends can be believed. According to those stories, the Salassi, who lived in the region before the Romans conquered it because of its strategic value, were already making wines from grapes grown in their own vineyards. It is known with certainty that in 23 BC the Roman legions crushed a rebellion by the valley's inhabitants and celebrated their victory by looting all the cellars of their wine. It was during the Middle Ages, however, that the wines of the Aosta Valley established a widespread reputation. And they acquired something of a “sacral” character as well because, according to numerous reports, they were used in the rite of exorcism. The physical layout of the valley favours the cultivation of vines because the mountains tend to block or turn aside the coldest winds, thereby creating suitable microclimates in which grapes have flourished since the remotest times. In the second half of the 19th century, the phylloxera epidemic devastated the Aosta Valley vineyards over a period of many years. Fortunately, although the devastation was enormous, destruction was not total. The vineyards slowly revived and flourished anew. The only lasting setback was the disappearance of several vine varieties. Donnaz was the valley's first DOC wine, receiving that recognition in 1971. The following year, it was the turn of Enfer d'Arvier. Although other wines were in line and qualified to receive the DOC designation, all further movement was halted until 1985 while a plan was worked out to place all regional wines of fine quality under the common denomination of Valle d'Aosta. Costantino Charrère is the driving force in the region. In the manner of Robert Plageoles he is the archivist and grape detective, seeking out native grape varieties on the verge of extinction and preserving their peculiar qualities in a host of wonderful wines made at his family winery and the famous Les Cretes venture that he runs in partnership with other well known figures from the region.

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