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Jack Daniels Single Barrel Rye Whiskey

Winemaker's Notes:

It’s no secret that Jack Daniel’s has been working on its rye for the better half of the decade. The company has been putting out works in progress since the beginning. “Unaged Rye” came in 2012; a brash “Rested Rye” hit in 2014. Now, in 2016, the finished product is finally here. My math pegs this about 3 1/2 years old. The mash hasn’t changed — 70 percent rye, 18 percent corn and 12 percent malted barley — and the rye undergoes the same charcoal filtration as all expressions of JD (and other Tennessee-based whiskies). It is worth noting that this final release has a significantly higher abv than either of the preview bottlings — and it is, curiously, a single barrel product. On the nose, the new rye offers nutty, roasted grains at first, backed up with sweet caramel, some chocolate, menthol, and a little red pepper. Over time, a bit of that characteristic JD charcoal emerges. The big baking spice aromas of a typical rye aren’t immediately evident, but the nose isn’t atypical, at least, of a younger, rye-heavy bourbon.

Region: USA » Tennessee

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Variety: Whisky
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Jack Daniels Distillery:
Jack Daniels is the world’s most popular brand of Tennessee sour mash Whiskey. The self-named distillery was officially licensed in 1866, making it the oldest registered distillery in the US. The signature release with the black label, also referred to as “Old No. 7” was originally bottled at 90 proof, “...the way our fathers made it.” However, it has been reduce... Read more
Jack Daniels is the world’s most popular brand of Tennessee sour mash Whiskey. The self-named distillery was officially licensed in 1866, making it the oldest registered distillery in the US. The signature release with the black label, also referred to as “Old No. 7” was originally bottled at 90 proof, “...the way our fathers made it.” However, it has been reduced since 2004 to 80 proof, supposedly in keeping with popular market preference. Following fermentation, the whiskey is filtered through sugar maple charcoal, before aging in oak barrels. This delivers the charcoal flavors for which it is known. This process also differentiates it from straight bourbon, which does not allow for charcoal filtration. Jack Daniels is therefore a Tennessee Whiskey and not to be confused with Bourbon.  Read less

It’s no secret that Jack Daniel’s has been working on its rye for the better half of the decade. The company has been putting out works in progress since the beginning. “Unaged Rye” came in 2012; a brash “Rested Rye” hit in 2014. Now, in 2016, the finished product is finally here. My math pegs this about 3 1/2 years old. The mash hasn’t changed — 70 percent rye, 18 percent corn and 12 percent malted barley — and the rye undergoes the same charcoal filtration as all expressions of JD (and other Tennessee-based whiskies). It is worth noting that this final release has a significantly higher abv than either of the preview bottlings — and it is, curiously, a single barrel product. On the nose, the new rye offers nutty, roasted grains at first, backed up with sweet caramel, some chocolate, menthol, and a little red pepper. Over time, a bit of that characteristic JD charcoal emerges. The big baking spice aromas of a typical rye aren’t immediately evident, but the nose isn’t atypical, at least, of a younger, rye-heavy bourbon.

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