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Foradori Teroldego Rotaliano 2003

Member Review by Philip James:

Dense fruit nose, deep a earth. Good food wine. Robust enough, yet versatile

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Azienda Agricola Elisabetta Foradori:
The cliffs of the Adige Valley change their appearance as the light shifts across them: awe inspiring when they are veiled by shade or darkened by a heavy sky; and enchanting when the sun shines on them, as they are tinted with delicate shades of pink. The river too changes its mood as the weather changes: when there is bad weather, its rough waters become a whirlpool of green and blue, while o... Read more
The cliffs of the Adige Valley change their appearance as the light shifts across them: awe inspiring when they are veiled by shade or darkened by a heavy sky; and enchanting when the sun shines on them, as they are tinted with delicate shades of pink. The river too changes its mood as the weather changes: when there is bad weather, its rough waters become a whirlpool of green and blue, while on calm evenings they become a sparkling silver ribbon. No one with a sensitive soul can cross this land without being touched by its beauty. After the narrow Salorno Gorge, visitors travelling from the north are welcomed by the marvellous sight of a wide valley. Vineyards and orchards are scattered among these rocky outcrops. Near San Michele all’Adige, on the right bank of the Adige River, a wide plain unfolds beneath the mountains: its name is Campo Rotaliano. This is where the Teroldego, one of the country’s best grapes, thrives. Despite its charm and beauty, this stretch of country is still waiting to be discovered in all its wonder. It is no coincidence that this striking landscape marks the linguistic and cultural boundary between the Tyrol and Trentino, between north and south - an invisible border, yet nevertheless a border. This is where Elisabetta Foradori was born. The Noce valley, Campo Rotaliano with the towns of Mezzolombardo and Mezzocorona, has seen tribes and rulers come and go – Rhaeto-Etruscan settlers, the Romans, Celts, Longobards, Franks, Tyroleans, Austrians, Bavarians and Italians. Whether conquerors or settlers, traders or mercenaries, all have left their mark at this crossroads where valleys, rivers and mountain ranges converge and diverge. Read less

Member Reviews for Foradori Teroldego Rotaliano

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Snooth User: Philip James
112,550
3.50 5
11/14/2007

Dense fruit nose, deep a earth. Good food wine. Robust enough, yet versatile




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