+ Add Critic Score

Submit a Critic Score

Score:

Name of Critic:

Close

Dolianum Dolcetto di Dogliani Superiore 2001

Winemaker's Notes:

Tasting Notes: The amount of Dolcetto di Dogliani Superiore " Dolianum" DOC that is sourced from the "Vigna del Pilone"cru vineyard is actually quite small, and varies from year to year. In good vintages, about 20% of this Dolcetto is matured in 5-to 25-hectolitre oak barrels, some new and some used. One might say that this wine is still in the experimental stage, since that vineyard has traditionally been managed with an eye to production of wines to enjoy within the year. Changing cultivation methods--lower yields and a sustainable farming philosophy--has yielded grapes with higher sugar levels and improved polyphenol profile. A wine produced from such exceptional-quality fruit is certainly far different from the previous, traditionally-produced Dolcetto. This traditional Dolcetto must, nevertheless, absolutely continue to play its role, since it enjoys pride of place in our region's everyday meals. We felt, however, that the dolcetto variety could definitely yield something better than everyday table wine. Thanks to scientific research and revised vineyard practices over the past few years, we have been able to produce wines that deserve higher-quality recognition, and a request has been made for the granting of DOCG status with simply "Dogliani" as the designation. The reason for the geographical name is that the wine really transcends its grape variety. Thus we thought it only right to link the name of the wine to the area that has grown this grape for many centuries. It is in this precise light that the commune of Dogliani, in August 1593, issued a document (available at the Town Hall) that reads: "Let no one dare, before the feast of St. Matthew (September 21), to harvest the grapes, and should anyone, through necessity or for any other reason, harvest dozzetti (dolcetto), he should receive permission from the deputy; under pain of forfeiture of said grapes..." This long tradition would have been useless, however, had that wine not become the staple that it is today, available everywhere fine foodstuffs and wines are offered. The harvest for Dolianum takes place in late September and beyond, as dictated by sugar and acid levels, as well as by phenolic ripeness. The grapes that are optimally ripe then undergo a 24-72-hour cold maceration (13-15°C). The temperature is then allowed to rise so that the fermentation can begin, which continues for 6-10 days at temperatures ranging from 25°C to a maximum of 30°C, after which the wine is drawn off. A very small amount of residual sugar remains in the wine, some 2-3 grams per litre (but this does not always happen), and this will ferment in the oak barrels, where the wine rests for about a year. The wine is then blended in stainless steel tanks, where it remains for 6-8 months. It is then racked, very gently in order to preserve its sensory qualities, since this grape's varietal characteristics are difficult to extract and to maintain undiminished over time. Bottling takes place in June-July and release after at least three to four months of bottle-ageing. Percentage Grape: Dolcetto 100% Soil: Sand 27% Silt 51% Clay 22%. Alcohol Percentage: 13.5 % Sugar Rate: 0-5 g/l

Vintages

  • 2001

+ Vintage
Color: Red
Varietal: Dolcetto
  • + My Wines

    My Wines

    Save in My Wines

    Add to Wishlist

    My Cellar

  • List It
  • Add Review
0 5 0.5
Average Rating Rate It Add

Tasting Notes: The amount of Dolcetto di Dogliani Superiore " Dolianum" DOC that is sourced from the "Vigna del Pilone"cru vineyard is actually quite small, and varies from year to year. In good vintages, about 20% of this Dolcetto is matured in 5-to 25-hectolitre oak barrels, some new and some used. One might say that this wine is still in the experimental stage, since that vineyard has traditionally been managed with an eye to production of wines to enjoy within the year. Changing cultivation methods--lower yields and a sustainable farming philosophy--has yielded grapes with higher sugar levels and improved polyphenol profile. A wine produced from such exceptional-quality fruit is certainly far different from the previous, traditionally-produced Dolcetto. This traditional Dolcetto must, nevertheless, absolutely continue to play its role, since it enjoys pride of place in our region's everyday meals. We felt, however, that the dolcetto variety could definitely yield something better than everyday table wine. Thanks to scientific research and revised vineyard practices over the past few years, we have been able to produce wines that deserve higher-quality recognition, and a request has been made for the granting of DOCG status with simply "Dogliani" as the designation. The reason for the geographical name is that the wine really transcends its grape variety. Thus we thought it only right to link the name of the wine to the area that has grown this grape for many centuries. It is in this precise light that the commune of Dogliani, in August 1593, issued a document (available at the Town Hall) that reads: "Let no one dare, before the feast of St. Matthew (September 21), to harvest the grapes, and should anyone, through necessity or for any other reason, harvest dozzetti (dolcetto), he should receive permission from the deputy; under pain of forfeiture of said grapes..." This long tradition would have been useless, however, had that wine not become the staple that it is today, available everywhere fine foodstuffs and wines are offered. The harvest for Dolianum takes place in late September and beyond, as dictated by sugar and acid levels, as well as by phenolic ripeness. The grapes that are optimally ripe then undergo a 24-72-hour cold maceration (13-15°C). The temperature is then allowed to rise so that the fermentation can begin, which continues for 6-10 days at temperatures ranging from 25°C to a maximum of 30°C, after which the wine is drawn off. A very small amount of residual sugar remains in the wine, some 2-3 grams per litre (but this does not always happen), and this will ferment in the oak barrels, where the wine rests for about a year. The wine is then blended in stainless steel tanks, where it remains for 6-8 months. It is then racked, very gently in order to preserve its sensory qualities, since this grape's varietal characteristics are difficult to extract and to maintain undiminished over time. Bottling takes place in June-July and release after at least three to four months of bottle-ageing. Percentage Grape: Dolcetto 100% Soil: Sand 27% Silt 51% Clay 22%. Alcohol Percentage: 13.5 % Sugar Rate: 0-5 g/l

Best Wine Deals

See More Deals

Dolcetto Top Lists







Snooth Media Network