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De Wine Spot USD 10.00 750ml

Boroli Madonna di Como Dolcetto d'Alba 2009

Winemaker's Notes:

The Borolis are a Piedmontese family who have been in business in the region - first in textiles, and now in winegrowing - since 1831. Boroli is comprised of two estates: Cascina Bompe, in a small village just outside of Alba with its own winery and La Brunella in the heart of Barolo in Castiglione Falletto. In addition to the vineyards above, the property includes Villero and Borgata Cerequio both considered two of the Langhe's great cru vineyards. Each vineyard has a particular terrior - La Brunella has a mostly mediumloamy chalk soil with sand veins, and east to south, southwesterly and west exposures. The Villero exposition is south-southwest and the soil is a moisture-retaining mix of marl, clay and silt. Borgata Cerequio faces south and southeast on limestone and sand soil, at an altitude of 900 feet above sea level. The estate's director is the winemaker Enzo Alluvione, who is assisted by his son Daniele in the vineyards. The estate's consultant is the noted winemaker Beppe Caviola who was chosen a Gambero Rosso's Winemaker of the Year in 2002. As Dolcetto is low in natural acidity, it tends to lack that zip that accompanies Barbera and thus doesn't quite pair as well with fatty or highly textured dishes. The wine is not intended to pair with fine or elegant cuisine. It's advantage, however, is in its ability to pair well with more rustic, everyday dishes such as burgers, sausages, pizza, and roasted chicken and appetizers and hors d'oeuvres such as antipasto or a pasta dish with a creamy tomato sauce. Deli sandwiches of nearly any composition work very well with Dolcetto. And for those looking for a different style of wine to pair with chorizo, Dolcetto will work well. You can even pair the wine with mild fish or shellfish. Halibut, salmon, scallops, trout and even shrimp, if prepared in a mild tomato based sauce, accented with a little pancetta, sausage or ham, works delightfully. Add some olives and sautéed onions and you have yourself quite a tasty pairing. And don't shy away from enjoying a glass by itself. Finally, if you're looking to pair with cheeses, try Mozzarella, ricotta, Brie, Fontina, Gouda or Taleggio.

Region: Italy » Piemonte » Barbaresco » Alba
Winery: Boroli
Color: Red
Varietal: Dolcetto
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Boroli:
Cascina Bompè The history of this magical place is interesting: the Celts who inhabited the area since the 4th century AD worshipped amongst others “Como”, the god of feasts; the Romans arrived during the first century AD and the name “Como” came to mean a procession of young dancers in honours of the wine god Bacchus... The Borolis are a piedmontese family who have been in busines... Read more
Cascina Bompè The history of this magical place is interesting: the Celts who inhabited the area since the 4th century AD worshipped amongst others “Como”, the god of feasts; the Romans arrived during the first century AD and the name “Como” came to mean a procession of young dancers in honours of the wine god Bacchus... The Borolis are a piedmontese family who have been in business in the region – first in textiles, then editorial, and now in winegrowing – since 1831. In the 1990’s, Silavano ed Elena Boroli felt the need to extend their interest and endeavours. They wanted something that would bring them closer to nature and away from the demands of the contemporary business world. As Piedmontese, the choice was almost an obligation: making wine in Langa. A passion transformed into work. What could be better? Wine production isn’t the easiest work it’s consuming, subject to nature, and success can’t always be predicted. But it’s exactly for these reasons that success in this area can give great satisfaction. In 2000 Achille, the third of the four Boroli sons entered the family wine business. The culture of wine, includes many things besides the wine itself. In the Boroli’s case, quality is always the common denominator, in their role as wine producers as well as the product itself. The farm director is the oenologist Enzo Alluvione, assisted by his son Daniele for the vineyards and by Achille Boroli for the marketing and selling. The farm consultant is the oenologist Beppe Caviola. The vines grown are nebbiolo, barbera, merlot, cabernet, sauvignon, dolcetto, white moscato and chardonnay, following the guiot standard of vine raising. 5,000-7,000 kilograms of grapes are produced per hectare, with an average of 1,5 kilos per vinestock and a density of around 4,000 vinestocks per hectare. Cascina La Brunella This farm is situated in the municipality of Castiglione Falletto, at the heart of Barolo country, in a very panoramic hilly position, at a height of 318 metres above sea level. The property is made up of around 10 hectares. The soil is mainly a medium loamy chalk with sand veins with an east to south, south-westerly exposure and west exposure. Read less

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The Borolis are a Piedmontese family who have been in business in the region - first in textiles, and now in winegrowing - since 1831. Boroli is comprised of two estates: Cascina Bompe, in a small village just outside of Alba with its own winery and La Brunella in the heart of Barolo in Castiglione Falletto. In addition to the vineyards above, the property includes Villero and Borgata Cerequio both considered two of the Langhe's great cru vineyards. Each vineyard has a particular terrior - La Brunella has a mostly mediumloamy chalk soil with sand veins, and east to south, southwesterly and west exposures. The Villero exposition is south-southwest and the soil is a moisture-retaining mix of marl, clay and silt. Borgata Cerequio faces south and southeast on limestone and sand soil, at an altitude of 900 feet above sea level. The estate's director is the winemaker Enzo Alluvione, who is assisted by his son Daniele in the vineyards. The estate's consultant is the noted winemaker Beppe Caviola who was chosen a Gambero Rosso's Winemaker of the Year in 2002. As Dolcetto is low in natural acidity, it tends to lack that zip that accompanies Barbera and thus doesn't quite pair as well with fatty or highly textured dishes. The wine is not intended to pair with fine or elegant cuisine. It's advantage, however, is in its ability to pair well with more rustic, everyday dishes such as burgers, sausages, pizza, and roasted chicken and appetizers and hors d'oeuvres such as antipasto or a pasta dish with a creamy tomato sauce. Deli sandwiches of nearly any composition work very well with Dolcetto. And for those looking for a different style of wine to pair with chorizo, Dolcetto will work well. You can even pair the wine with mild fish or shellfish. Halibut, salmon, scallops, trout and even shrimp, if prepared in a mild tomato based sauce, accented with a little pancetta, sausage or ham, works delightfully. Add some olives and sautéed onions and you have yourself quite a tasty pairing. And don't shy away from enjoying a glass by itself. Finally, if you're looking to pair with cheeses, try Mozzarella, ricotta, Brie, Fontina, Gouda or Taleggio.

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