Wine & Food

Snooth User: cindymarch

WINEAND CHOCOLATE

Posted by cindymarch, Jul 28, 2009.

HI IM NEW WITH THIS SITE IM ACTUALLY LOOKING FOR SUGGESTIONS OF WINE TO DRINK WITH KANGAROO, OSTRICH AND BUFFALLO. YELLOW TAIL SHIRAZ IS GOOD WITH KANGAROO I KNOW THAT .

Replies

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Reply by George Parkinson, Jul 28, 2009.

The preparation & the sauce are your binding agents with the wine. That said I am a big advocate for anything goes, no rules, you like it, it works. OK so now what, I had pittsburgh Grilled Ostrich with some rockin' rich zinfandel, and buffalo burgers work well with a syrah from argentina. you got me on Kangaroo, can't eat anything that can out punch me. for white I'd try a multi layered Riesling from Alsace or a Brut Rose, Like Gruet from New Mexico. Good eatin'

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Reply by cindymarch, Jul 28, 2009.

THANKS ALOT FOR YOUR SUGGESTIONS WILL DEFINATLEY TRY THEM . SMALL LOCAL BUTCHER CARRIES EXOTIC MEATS . JUST ANOTHER EXCUSE TO TRY DIFFERENT WINES I THINK .

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Reply by gregt, Jul 28, 2009.

I was worried that you were trying to pair wine with chocolate. I never understand why people keep trying. As far as ostrich, buffalo, etc., lots of hearty reds work. I've had Bordeaux, Northern Rhones, Southern Rhones, Riojas, and Zins with them and they all work in their ways.

Incidentally, no need to shout - hit the CAP LOCK key so you're not typing all in caps. Some people consider it a bit rude.

Cheers.

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Reply by cindymarch, Jul 29, 2009.

Thanks Greg for the tips. All of them !! I'll go shopping today. Have a good one.

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Reply by penguinoid, Jul 29, 2009.

Kangaroo is essentially a game meat -- so look for wines which go with dark, rich game meats. Syrah and Cabernet sauvignon can both be good bets. GregT's suggestions sound pretty good for kangaroo too.

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Reply by cindymarch, Jul 29, 2009.

This site is going to be very helpful !! Lots of suggestions to pick from. Thanks again

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Reply by gregt, Jul 29, 2009.

Oh yeah, one other thing - it can depend on what you're making w the meat. For example, I think game goes really well with fruit, e.g. venison and wild berries, duck and cherries, ostrich and peaches, etc. Even if you don't do that, you can match fruity young wines with the game - like garnacha/grenache from the S Rhone, Australia, CA or Spain, or zinfandel or a lot of Australian shiraz or a really ripe PN from CA.

If you're doing something more savory, with lots of herbs, mushrooms, etc., then I'd go with something less fruit-forward. For example, wild boar and Barolo is kind of classic, or if you do the ostrich in herbs and pepper, a savory north Rhone syrah could work, or a Ribera del Duero.

Where do you get your meats? Do you shoot any of them? I used to have friends who hunted but unfortunately in NYC I don't know anyone who does.

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Reply by Charles Emilio, Jul 29, 2009.

With Kangaroo meat, ive always found a cool climate peppery shiraz works well

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Reply by cindymarch, Jul 30, 2009.

Thanks again Greg T, I think I'm actually just going to do little ground meat sliders with them .To not mask the taste of the meat at all . Its a way to try the meant for the first time to get the real flavour. I will have a salad with blackberriies blueberries raspberries and possilbly pecans and a little brie cut up and a tiny bit of pear. So I was on the right track with the berries /fruit idea. Im getting my meat from a local butcher who is from Australia he imports and grinds all his exotic meats to keep the cost down for newbies like myself to be able to try without breaking the bank. We do hunt game around here but mostly moose and deer . I cant see NYC being good huntng country probably frowned upon!! Have you always lived there?

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Reply by cindymarch, Jul 30, 2009.

Thanks Charles, What is the difference between the cool climate and the warmer climate wines . Is it the intensity or the flavor?

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Reply by gregt, Jul 30, 2009.

Didn't always live here. Lived in Michigan where people would actually hunt whitetail deer with Uzis. Not full auto of course, but the state is full of them. Been here for over 20 years tho.

The difference between cool and warmer climate wines can be huge or not so big depending on what the winemaker elects to do. Sun and heat have slightly different effects. Each grape needs a certain amount of sun, called sun-hours, to go from blossom to berry to ripe berry. The sun is obviously the source of energy for the plant. The leaves capture the sun energy and use that to trigger reactions throughout the plant.

The berry is like a little engine all by itself. It's trying to produce a seed so that the plant can reproduce. The delivery mechanism for all of the various items needed by the plant is water, that comes up from the soil and evaporates from the leaves. So the water delivers various elements to the berry where they get metabolized into various sugars/starches, proteins, etc., but the driving force behind all of this is sunlight.

Heat speeds up the reactions and increases the transpiration rate as well so the plant draws up and also loses more water. Look at your flowers after a few days of heat - they wilt. How does this affect the berries?

Initially, when it is very young, the berry synthesizes most of its sugars itself. It's getting the basic materials like amino acids, phosphates, vitamins, various inorganic elements, etc., delivered by the water and it puts them together into various carbohydrates and acids. In fact the berry is working really hard to synthesize acids up until veraison, which is the French term used to describe the color change that occurs when the berry shifts gears from growing to ripening.

As the berry gets bigger, more of its carbohydrates are delivered by the plant, mostly from the nearby leaves. And at that point, the growth of the shoots slows down so all the carbs can go to the berries rather than new growth. So the berry gets more sugar even tho it's slowing down its own production.

So now we come to the difference between sun and heat. The metabolic rates slow as the temperature drops. So remember that the berry has worked like mad to synthesize a lot of acids in its youth. If we have warm weather, the berry will be taking on more sugars and to our tastes, will be getting sweeter. If the nights are cold however, the metabolism isn't as fast and the berry retains a higher ratio of acid to sugar. For that reason, people are always looking for areas with big temperature swings from day to night, and the best wines usually come from those areas - the desert mountains in Washington, the mountains in CA, the hills in Ribera del Duero, the Rhone, Germany, and elsewhere.

If you don't have those swings in temp and you have unremittingly hot weather, the rest of the grape is still trying to develop at it's regular growth rate so you can end up with a high sugar content in grapes that haven't actually reached full maturity in other respects - e.g. the skins and associated tannins, the seeds, etc. Sugar converts to alcohol so one characteristic of warmer climate wines can be higher alcohol content and/or a sweeter, riper, wine.

So the first thing you get is a difference in texture between a wine from warm vs cool climates. In addition, when a grape like syrah/shiraz is grown in a cool place, you'll typically find a higher apparent acidity to it. Also, the flavor profile differs - at its best, syrah has a distinct note of black pepper and spice that to me, make it a wonderful grape. You almost never get that from syrah that comes from really hot climates.

But winemaking has a lot to do with it as well. Depending on how long you let the grapes hang on the vine, how long you macerate them, the temperature at which you ferment them, and what you do insofar as attenuating the sugar, acidity, or alcohol levels, you can affect a lot of what you got from nature in the first place.

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Reply by Charles Emilio, Jul 30, 2009.

Great info Greg, and nice and easy to understand.

In regards to cool climate shiraz.
Im only familiar with Australian ones and if anyone should wish to try some instead of those overripe, alcoholic jammy fruit bombs that are apparently only made there, I recommend you search for some from the following Australian cool climate regions.

Heathcote
Grampians
Pyrenees
Yarra Valley
Adelaide Hills

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Reply by penguinoid, Jul 31, 2009.

I'd second Charles Emilio's suggestion to look for some Australian cool climate shirazes -- there are some nice ones out there. In the Grampians, Mt Langhi Ghiran is a good one to look out for.

I'd also add too that if you look around you can find some nice examples of shiraz from the McLaren Vale and the Barossa which aren't just fruit bombs. I just tried a Langmeil 2007 Valley Floor Shiraz, which was more peppery/smoky than I'd expect for a Barossa shiraz and was pretty good. I ended up getting a bottle of the 2006 Three Gardens Shiraz Grenach Mouvèdre, though. Though not peppery, Elderton Command Shiraz is pretty good too. It's not cheap, though.

In the McLaren Vale, Coriole are worth looking out for.

Tasmania is worth adding to your list of interesting Australian cool climate regions. They are not growing much in the way of Shiraz though -- Pinot Noir is what that area is really becoming known for.


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