Wine Talk

Snooth User: Mark Angelillo

Wine Statistics

Posted by Mark Angelillo, Mar 20, 2008.

Sometimes I run across some good or surprising wine statistics. Here are a few of my favorites from my class at the IWC.

- Number of bottles of wine produced in Bordeaux in one year: 700,000,000
- Italy produces one fifth of the world's wine.

What else?

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Replies

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Reply by Philip James, Mar 20, 2008.

"Kent: Mr. Simpson, how do you respond to the charges that petty vandalism such as graffiti is down eighty percent, while heavy sack-beatings are up a shocking 900%?

Homer: Aw, people can come up with statistics to prove anything, Kent. Fourfty percent of all people know that."

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Reply by Philip James, Mar 20, 2008.

With that said...

- 1 in 7 of every bottle of wine imported into the US is a Pinot Grigio!
- The 5 largest wine companies in the US sell 85% of the volume of wine in the US
- It takes 600 grapes to make a bottle of wine

Not sure about these, but give or take...

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Mar 20, 2008.

-In most of the past 15 years Europe's wine production was 100 to 105% of the world's wine demand. Since we all know that Australia, Africa, and the Americas produce a huge amount of wine, this gives you an idea of how much European goes unsold!
-1 in 7 bottles of imported wine in the US is Italian Pinot Grigio
-New Zealand's wine production has tripled since 1992.
-France produces one fifth of the world's wine (France and Italy produce about the same amount of wine).
-Spain has 15% of the world's vineyard acreage - that's more than Italy and California combined!
-Argentina produced more wine than the US until the mid 1990s.

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Reply by Mark Angelillo, Mar 24, 2008.

US residents consumed 0.26 gallons of wine per capita in 1934. Now (2006) it's more like 2.39 gallons per capita. http://www.wineinstitute.org/resour...

They're including vermouth though so it's possible the nation is hitting the martinis like they're going out of style -- though I happen to doubt it.

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Mar 24, 2008.

Its interesting to look at total alcohol consumption during this same period (peaking in the early 1980s) and the relative trends in wine and beer. It looks like there is some substitution going on, but there was one generation in the 1970s that hit the bottle HARD. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pi...

Of course, since this is a scientific journal it uses liters... and its consumption data is much lower (1 liter instead of 1 gallon) than that of the Wine Institute. I'd be interested in comparing their methologies.

Mark - How much Vermouth is in your Martini?

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Reply by Mark Angelillo, Mar 24, 2008.

Oh it's a standard recipe. A splash of gin in the glass, swirl and dump. Fill a shaker with vermouth and ice -- stir or shake and then strain into the gin-coated glass. Garnish with an olive.

(Okay, I'm trying hard to imagine a worse drink than the one I just described. Please don't try that at home...)

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Reply by gr, Mar 26, 2008.

Actually, drinking sweet, white vermouth (not "sweet" rosso vermouth, and not dry vermouth) straight is pretty common in mainland Europe, and not too bad (though obviously not the same thing).

I go through way more vermouth cooking than I do in martinis (obviously), and I think that may be what's skewing the Wine Institute's figures v. medical findings: the former is talking sales, the latter reported consumption. (Just a guess, though, I'm too lazy to go look for methodologies.)

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Reply by SusieJ, Mar 27, 2008.

The numbers in the two studies varied so widely (an order or magnitude when converted to liters) that one was lying, or they measured different things. The wine institute is measuring wine (about 12 750 ml bottles per person of drinking age in 2006); the cirrhosis study measured pure alcohol drunk: "Total per capita consumption and figures for the consumption of specific beverages are expressed in absolute alcohol equivalents, which were calculated in our source by dividing the total number of gallons sold by estimates of the alcohol content of specific beverages and then by estimates of the population, aged 15 and older (before 1971) or 14 and older (1971-1994). Although the mean alcohol content of distilled spirits declined marginally after 1973, our estimates of the consumption of spirits have not been adjusted for this factor." And, as wine is a bit more than one tenth alcohol, the numbers make sense.

(I drink sweet red vermouth straight. But I also drink Campari.)

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Reply by gr, Mar 27, 2008.

Yes, well, "damn lies" and all.

And I'd quote RBoulanger on Campari here, but I figure he can take care of that if he'd like.

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Reply by John Andrews, Mar 30, 2008.

Found a great information sheet while working at the winery (Loxton Cellars) this weekend:

1 barrel = 24.6 Cases of Wine = 240 lbs of grapes = 59 gallons = 1,180 glasses of wine
1 case = 12 bottles = 48 glasses of wine = 30 lbs of grapes
1 glass = 2.4 lbs of grapes

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Reply by gr, Apr 3, 2008.

Clearly, RBoulanger doesn't remember or doesn't care, but he said it (to me) first:

There are two kinds of people. Those that have a shot gone from the top of their bottle of Campari and those that have a shot left.

(And since, SusieJ, you took that as my thinking there was something "wrong" with Campari, I'm one of the latter.)

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 7, 2008.

I blogged about what the wine and spirits industry contributes to the US economy here: http://www.snooth.com/talk#http://w...

There's some stats, but I'd be interested to see how much money is lost due to hangovers the next day...

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 8, 2008.

@gr - Actually I just got back from Northern Italy. Ten days ago I was in Novara, birthplace of Campari, and was slacking on my snoothing. The other Campari thing I remember saying to you is that everyone needs to try Campari 3 times in their life to determine which kind of person they are. Many of those people with one shot gone haven't gotten far enough.

@John - Do you have a Loxton conversion for how many individual berries go into a pound of grapes? Obviously it will vary by varietal and ripeness, but we can at least validate Philip's 600 grapes axiom.

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 10, 2008.

Stolen shamelessly from the most recent Wine Marketer newsletter, and credited to Steven Frederick, Sales Manager - R&R Wine Marketing:

Remember the average life span of a bottle of wine in the US is just under 3 days!

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 10, 2008.

Wow - what can we do to stop this unnecessary loss of life?

I think what you (and Steven) really mean is:
-The average bottle of wine spends less than 3 days in the end consumer's possession before being consumed?

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 10, 2008.

haha, yes! i just quoted it. Perhaps i should have added the snooty editors note "(sic)". I also assume thats the mean, as you and I both well know the mode average would be less than 1 day. ie. buy it on the way home from work and drink it that night.

Damn statistics

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Reply by John Andrews, Apr 10, 2008.

@RB ... got nothing ... checked around a bit we don't have a number like #of berries into a pound of grapes. You're right there are too many variables to it make it a significant number. When we talk to people about production we always start at the barrel level as it is pretty consistent volume. Tonnage per acre, bunches per vine, things like that will vary dramatically from vineyard to vineyard.

That being said ... It think 600 grapes is a little low ... I think it is more 'accurate' to say about 2 to 3 pounds of grapes.

I found a great 'statistic' site for California wine: http://www.wineinstitute.org/resour...

And oF course TTB has interesting info too: http://www.ttb.gov/wine/stats.shtml

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 10, 2008.

@Philip - the urban legend that a Manhattan wine shop owner once told me is that "85% of the bottles of wine sold in any given day are opened before midnight that day."

Honestly, I find that hard to believe. A few multiple case orders would mess the whole thing up. I would believe something along the lines of this:
"85% of walk-in customers to a Manhattan wine shop any given day open at least one of their purchased bottles before midnight"

Ok enough precision - I need a glass of wine now!

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 10, 2008.

RB - your second claim is probably more reliable, but you add so many qualifiers, it ceases to have much impact.

I point you back to my simpsons quote near the top...

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Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 10, 2008.

True... how about if I rephrase it as

"In Manhattan wine shops, 6 in 7 walk-in customers are looking for a wine to consume with that evening's dinner."

You cannot claim that doesn't have impact. You'd build an entire retail model around it!

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