Wine & Travel

Snooth User: marj1994

Wine Selection in Turkey

Posted by marj1994, Apr 20, 2010.

I am traveling to Turkey in two weeks.  What kinds of wine do that have.

Replies

5
1386
Reply by amour, Apr 21, 2010.

You are sure to have an interesting wine experience.

I have visited and I can safely tell you that their CORVUS BLEND BIANCO is quite tangy and refreshing.  The 2008 should  be drinkable until at least 2011.  It is a blend of their two of their many indigenous grapes (Cavus and Vasliki), and a small amount of sauvignon blanc.

There is a new CORVUS winery on BOZCAADA.

Kavaklidere wines are popular.

Tekel is the largest winery and Sarafin is the very first boutique type winery.

Buzbag wine is another one . It is from the Bogazkere grapes grown in the Anatolia region.

Several experts often mention the problems of the long distances from which grapes are transported as well as oak management problems and other negative factors which I think are all being dealt with however slowly.

Cheers!

0
5
Reply by marj1994, Apr 21, 2010.

Thanks so much for the information.  It should be an interesting trip.

74
276
Reply by Degrandcru, Apr 21, 2010.

I haven´t tried the wine when traveling to Turkey, just their Raki, their national Anis drink (which is consumed with water like Patice in France).

One thing that you have to be aware of is that there is no alcohol served in a certain distance of a mosque (at least in Istanbul). And there are mosques everywhere. So whereever I sat down to have a Beer or a Raki the waiter just shook his head and pointed to the next mosque. I got so annoyed by it, that I won't travel to muslim countries anymore if I don't have to. But besides that Istanbul is a beautiful, fascinating city. Have fun.

20
5811
Reply by dmcker, Apr 21, 2010.

I've had lots of wine and other forms of alcohol in Turkey (not just Istanbul), many parts of Indonesia, Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon and Egypt, Degrandccru. Mosques and other community concerns can be an issue, but the obstacles to consumption in those countries aren't all that great. We travel to encounter differences, anyway, don't we? A few nations in SW Asia are, however, a different story.

0
5
Reply by marj1994, Apr 22, 2010.

Thanks Degrandcru and dmcker.  I agree dmcker, we do travel to encounter differences.  Degrandcru I am looking forward to trying the Raki.  Did you have any problems with the water.  I have been told that can be a problem.

74
276
Reply by Degrandcru, Apr 22, 2010.

No problem with the water, if in doubt just stick to bottled water.

28
129
Reply by dirkwdeyoung, Apr 24, 2010.

Don't worry, every restaurant will just have a couple of choices anyway. They are really just good table wines. The main choice you have to make is white, or red.  Don't forget to visit the cisterns near Haya Sofia, some people miss those.  Enjoy the sheperds salads, tajik sauce with your grills and I like the turkish pizzas a lot (lahmacun).  Istanbul is fabulous, be sure to take the ferry boats, they are the best tourist deal, you can just go back and forth and visit the Dolmabahçe Palace, not just topkapi. The tramways are excellent to get around and much cheaper than the taxis. You can use the bottled water, everybody does it for the Raki anyway...Sherife!

603
1066
Reply by zufrieden, Apr 24, 2010.

I'm not convinced many of you know the highly cosmopolitan nature of the Turkish people.  In western cities - such as the former Greek city states of Izmir (ancient Smyrna) - the Turks are highly westernized and not particularly enamored of the strict Islamic principal of abstemiousness.  If they were, why would raki be their de facto national drink?

However, given the dodgy politics of the region I don't want to make any suggestions that might offend - only to remind people that what others say is the case often isn't.

As to Buzbag - once produced by Tekel, the now defunct national brand of Turkey - this is a wine with great potential (heard that before, pray?) but something unlikely to prosper in a country that has yet to find its ethical bearings.

When you visit Turkey, use some caution and see what the locals are really doing, and see how many interupt their daily routines at certain key points during the day. What they should be doing and what they actually do could be two entirley different things...

0
5
Reply by marj1994, Apr 24, 2010.

dirkwdeyoung and zufriden:  Thanks so much for your replies: I will be Kusadasi 8 nights, Bursa 1 night and Istanbul 4 nights.  Sounds like, thanks to you I will do fine.  Dirkwdeyoung do you think it is o.k. to eat the lettuce on the sheperds salads - they sound great.

28
129
Reply by dirkwdeyoung, Apr 24, 2010.

Marj1994,

I enjoyed all kinds of fresh vegetables in Turkey, they are really wonderful, the salads are most delicious.  No one can garantee every plate that you get in front of you in any country, but generally I would have no concerns about problems of freshness and wholesomeness of foods in Turkey. Anyway, that has been my experience after three visits there over app. 30 years time frame.

28
129
Reply by dirkwdeyoung, Apr 24, 2010.

By the way, if you need a hotel suggestion, last time I stayed at the SED Hotel, it is just a little walk off of Taksim Square. It has a fabulous view of the Bosphorus from the roof top restuarant, where they have a nice fresh breakfast buffet every morning (cucumber, tomatoes, cheese, olives, yogurt, coffee, etc ). Taksim is nice because of the shops and restaurants and street life at night. Bars/Music etc.  For more old world maybe Sultanahmet is better, close to the Topkapi, Haya Sofia and Grand Bazaar.  There is just too much in Istanbul, I wish you a happy visit. If you want to buy a carpet, they can package it for you, so you can check it on the plane :)

20
5811
Reply by dmcker, Apr 28, 2010.

The Western coast of Turkey, including Izmir, is a very different place from further inland, especially as you head way over towards Iraq and Kurdistan (oops, be careful how you use that term there). Ankara is very different from Istanbul. If you're mainly in the west of Turkey there aren't many places that aren't increasingly cosmopolitan these days.

Definitely stick to the bottled water, especially if you don't know your own tummy in a variety of circumstances. Salads in tourist areas should be no problem. Some parts of Turkey aren't all that different from nearby parts of Greece (though I'd quickly have fights in bars on both sides of the border if I said that out loud). I've personally never gotten sick in either country. Beautiful sailing all up and down the Aegean, if you have a chance to do any. Istanbul, those islands, that sea, that sun and food, the people, the dancing, the music...; really an excellent choice for a vacation.

Dirk, I think you may be being a bit too summary and condescending regarding Turkish wines. Though there are religious issues, and a horrible tax code regarding wines, remember they've been making it there just about as long as anywhere on earth. Plenty of easy-drinking cheap stuff, but there is in California, too. Try a range, Marj, both of local varietals and the more French names of grapes you'll recognize. You might be surprised.

0
5
Reply by marj1994, Apr 28, 2010.

Thanks for this post dmcker.  I am glad to know about the salads and the wine info.

28
129
Reply by dirkwdeyoung, Apr 28, 2010.

dmcker,

Don't think so, I think I am just being realistic about what is readily available in most restaurants, good wine to drink, nothing special.

I wasn't addressing the totality of Turkish Wine Culture.

603
1066
Reply by zufrieden, Apr 28, 2010.

In any case, I'm sure you'll have a good time.  In general, the Turkish people are quite friendly and accommodating.  And the place is just so very, very old and full of stories.


Back to Categories

Top Contributors This Month

324443 Snooth User: outthere
324443outthere
147 posts
125836 Snooth User: dmcker
125836dmcker
102 posts
680446 Snooth User: JonDerry
680446JonDerry
95 posts

Categories

View All





Snooth Media Network