Wine & Food

Snooth User: catiegrace

Wine Pairing Assistance Por Favor

Posted by catiegrace, Aug 13, 2010.

Hello All!

I'm putting a menu together for a wine pairing and wonder if anyone can recommend a white in the $25 range that pairs well with mushrooms stuffed with foie gras, they will be served alongside a carmelized onion bread pudding, so I guess I need a pretty significant white to stand up to that.  I would even consider a red if there is a better fit there. 

Thanks so much and I look forward to hearing any and all responses. 

cg

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Replies

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Aug 13, 2010.

Personally, I think this has Burgundy written all over it.  You could probably find Cyriot-Buthian Volnay around your max budget.

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

You could also start with a sauternes, though not an aged d'Yquem with your budget. Others are out there that should fall within. A sparkling wine from north of San Francisco is one other option I'd consider.

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Reply by catiegrace, Aug 13, 2010.

Thank you both, great advice at either end of the spectrum.

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Reply by Hawk101, Aug 13, 2010.

You have some pretty rich flavor and texture going on there. I wouldn't want the wine to compete.  Rather, support and perhaps palate cleanse.  I like dmcker's suggestion of a sparkler and would go with a prosecco perhaps even an off dry rose prosecco.  There are a host of really good makers and I would rely on the recommendation of a local merchant who you trust.  

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

Why not do a dry run and try all three options? Sounds like fun to me....

What follows in the tasting menu?

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Reply by mdwine, Aug 13, 2010.

I would go with a white rhone.  for $25.00 you will be able to do very well.  White Chateauneuf du pape can easily be found in htat price range and the quality will be exceptional as opposed to a $25.00 Burgundy

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Reply by catiegrace, Aug 13, 2010.

This is really so nice, and thank you all.  This is my first pairing event, but here's the menu:

Manchego
Rosemary Toasted Walnuts
>unoaked white Rioja<

Cold Grilled Shrimp over
Frisee Salad w/Lemon Vinaigrette
>Chateau St. Jean or Sonoma Cutrer Chardonnay<

Carmelized Onion Bread Pudding
Foie Gras Stuffed Mushrooms
>one of the above suggesions<

Parfait of Orange & Lemon spiked Mascarpone/Cold Berry Compote Topped with Cinnamon Bread Croutons
>Riesling<

 

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Reply by mdwine, Aug 13, 2010.

looks good just beware of acidic dressings with wines.....

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

Am curious about some of the choices. Why the 'unoaked' white Rioja and the Sonoma Cutrer chard? And what kind of riesling?

Also, is this the final order of the courses?

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

Also, not sure where you're going with the Rhone white suggestion, mdwine (other than the price point). I can't think of anything from there (esp. a viognier, but also a marsanne/roussanne/picpoul/ugni/etc.) that I'd want to have with the foie gras/mushroom combo. Can you explain a bit more?

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Reply by catiegrace, Aug 13, 2010.

Chose unoaked Spanish white to complement the Manchego and also so as not to overshadow the delicate buttery rosemary walnuts.

I would have chosen Rombauer, but not within the budget, so I went with the Cutrer, was looking to something buttery to follow up to the first course.  Does that make sense?  What ideas do you have?

Not wedded to all items on the menu, but I want to stick with the carmelized onion bread pudding, it's almost a souffle and the mascarpone parfait, other than those two, I'm flexible--what say you, you must have thoughts since you asked?

No decision on Riesling yet, the event is for six on 9/16, so I am crafting the menu and wine pairing at this point.

Thanks for your input dmcker!

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Reply by gregt, Aug 13, 2010.

Which Rioja?  I'd go with a fino for those walnuts.  Or maybe go with an older Rioja, which of course will have been oaked, but which has nut-like flavors.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Aug 13, 2010.

I agree that you might want a palate cleanser there, why not a chenin blanc?  South Africa calls it Steen, and good ones can be had for a lot less than $25.  Or one from Saumur or somewhere else in the Loire.  The acidity would hit the spot.  You could even go with a cremant from the Loire for some bubbles.  I wouldn't put a buttery chard up as early as you have it, because it's going to blunt the tastebuds, but would recommend the M Preston Grape Wine roussanne/marsanne/viognier in that spot if you want a little more mouthfeel and richness.  Of course, I don't like those chards that much to begin with, so our tastes may differ. But I think that's the place for a (northern) Rhone-ish wine, and the M Preston is a favorite at $24.  Now if someone would just stop recommending Yquem for everything... we aren't millionaires! ;-)

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

If going oldskool with a cheese course you could place the manchego third in that order (and the shrimp first), at which point even a rioja red would work if the cheese has any age on it. I'm with Greg on the older rioja white (with wood) or better yet a manazinilla or other fino sherry, matching the nuttiness, if it remains as the starter.

For the shrimp and salad (and watch the vinegar, for sure), with this budget I'd choose instead one of the bigger muscadet sur lies, or even a pigato (here're a few choices out in the marketplace) from the Ligurian Riviera near Cinque Terre. Very good with seafood, and while it has a rich and sweet nose is usually bone dry. It has great elements of citrus that should match your salad's dressing (that will likely slice right through the big, woodsy chardonnay you're considering). These two are an easier match than trying to find the right Chablis or Cotes d'Or (or even Maconaiss/Chalonnaise) chards within the budget.

I'll still stick with the sauternes (here's a very good half bottle that roughly fits the budget; small glasses for all!) or sparkling (Schramsberg definitely works, whether blanc de blancs or blanc de noirs, and you can hunt for other good options, too). If you want to share a bottle between the foie gras and mascarpone courses, you could even choose a Schramsberg cremant or other sec or demi-sec sparkling. Personally I'd do separate wines for the two courses, but still wouldn't rule out sparkling for both.

If you don't go with a sweet sparkler for the dessert and stick with the riesling, know that sweeter is definitely better in this instance. Spatleses might even have a rough time so I'd look for ausleses or better. I almost invariably stick to German, because that's what I know works. I've been disappointed over and over again with North American rieslings, though I haven't given up hunting.

 

Where are you located?

 

And Foxall, who was recommending d'Yquem? I was merely trying to point out that there are plenty of others out there beyond the name most people seem to fixate on for the area....

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 13, 2010.

Here's another source for Pigato: North Berkeley Imports is a very good wine purveyor, IMHO. Its focus is on European wines, esp. many off-the-beaten-track finds at good prices.

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Reply by napagirl68, Aug 14, 2010.

(California) Sonoma pinot noir- 2008 Lioco Pinot Noir

Mushrooms scream for this, and this is drier/lighter than most other Pinots from different regions within this state..   If you can't find this specific one, look for other Sonoma Coast Pinots... they are dry and lighter than central coastal varietals.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Aug 14, 2010.

dmcker--in rereading, I see you weren't recommending Yquem, but a Sauternes generally.  But in the birth year bottle thread, you also mentioned Yquem... do you have a birthday coming up? If the whole Snooth membership kicks in a dollar, maybe we could get you a b.y.b. of your own... BTW, for good sauternes, my #1 wine buddy buys through JJ Buckley, a more or less web-only outfit that will ship anywhere (and to your door same day in the Bay Area--you could pick a wine for a dinner party in the morning and have it before the guests arrive).  They are not my favorite shop, as I have said elsewhere, but they seem to have a good selection in bottles from Bordeaux generally and Sauternes particularly.

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 14, 2010.

Foxall, my only mention of 'd'Yquem and other Sauternes', in the thread on '95 and '97 birthyear bottle stockpiling, was as a counter to another poster who said that white wines were to be ruled out as candidates for aged wine stored over decades. I was using the name most people know for that region, and not suggesting it per se. It's definitely fine wine, but (together with Petrus and Romanee Conti) has been one of the original cultwines, from long before most of Bordeaux and DRC, etc. went price crazy this past decade or more. Most of the times I've drunk it is when others have provided it, or several of us have chipped in.

I like plenty of other sauternes besides Yquem, especially when I'm paying, though without a doubt it is a sublime bottle of wine, especially from a good year and when aged for decades. Other Sauternes and a Barsac I've drunk a fair amount of and liked include Suduiraut, Rieussec, Climens, Coutet, Lafaurie-Peyraguay and Filhot. There are others out there that are good, but unfortunately they're hard to find where I live, nor are they well represented at mailorder merchants. A lot of people don't know a lot about sauternes and barsacs, and demand seems to be a bit specialized.

If you click on the link up this thread where I suggest a good half bottle of sauternes for the foie gras and mushrooms course, you'll see it's a Rieussec from Buckley's for just a little more than $25.

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Reply by catiegrace, Aug 16, 2010.

Wow and wow, great information from everyone.  I live in NYC and find that sometimes it's as affordable to go with a French/Spanish/Italian wine as it is to go with a Californian and Northwest points, although I'm rather fond of the Willamette chards. 

After listening to all, I've altered the salad dressing from a lemon vinaigrette to a dijon mustard vinaigrette, and I really like dmcker's suggestion to separate the courses.  So now to get shopping and tasting before the big event.

Thanks again All, this was informing for my pairing as well as educational on general terms, particularly with regards to the Yquem!

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Reply by amour, Aug 16, 2010.

A few more thoughts and opinions.....

Chateau Lafaurie - Peyraguey can be  almost as great as the super Chateau d'Yquem.....I have had various vintages of both!....

with foie gras as well!

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