Wine Talk

Snooth User: dmcker

Who says Burgundy can't age?

Posted by dmcker, May 12.

HDH (and its auction clients) apparently think it can...

 


Remoissenet
Founded in 1877, Remoissenet is one of the Côte d’Or’s most esteemed historic négociant firms, as well as a holder of venerated library reserves. Located beneath the town of Beaune, Remoissenet’s famous cellars date back to the 14th century, and hold almost one million bottles of Premier Cru and Grand Cru wine spanning the twentieth century. Our Celebration of Burgundy sale features a cache of these historic wines direct from these cellars—so direct, in fact, that they are to remain resting in Remoissent’s cellars until they are awarded to winning bidders. All of these bottles have been reconditioned and issued new labels, capsules and wood containers.

A selection of Remoissenet’s library wines were recently reviewed by Antonio Galloni, who reported that the wines were showing gorgeously, calling them “striking,” “vibrant” and “engaging” (Antonio Galloni, Vinousmedia.com).

Highlights from Remoissenet:

Clos Vougeot
792 1953 Clos Vougeot (12 bs) $5500-8500
794 1955 Clos Vougeot (12 bs) $6000-9000
795 1957 Clos Vougeot (12 bs) $5000-7500
813 1985 Clos Vougeot (3 jeroboams (3L)) $2000-3000
814 1985 Clos Vougeot (1 sal (9L)) $2400-3500
Chambertin, Clos de Beze
798 1967 Chambertin, Clos de Bèze (12 bs) $3000-4500
803 1978 Chambertin, Clos de Bèze (6 mags) $3500-5500
810 1979 Chambertin, Clos de Bèze (6 mags) $3500-5500

 

I just finished my last '53 Remoissenet Clos Vougeot in January of this year. It was maybe at 2:00 o'oclock, past its peak, starting its slide downwards, even if battling all the way. But its storage conditions the past five years were not ideal. Having gone through a case each of Remoissenet's  '53s (Clos Vougeot, Vosne Romanee, Echezaux) between 1987 and 2014 (finished the others a couple years ago) with all but that one stored properly, I'm betting these perfect-provenance babies are still packing a punch, as well as being utterly delicious, to boot. I haven't read Galloni's review but the excerpts here are certainly believable. I received those cases (and others from Bordeaux) for helping a large Japanese firm start a boutique wine business in Paris, and have never regretted taking my fee in kind.

Gotta love the fact that one of the longest-lived Burgundies (Remoissenet is known for those capabilities) is still one of the most cost-effective.

Oh, and OT, think you're able to store any Sonoma pinots away for several decades to see how they stack up over time?  ;-)

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Replies

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Reply by gregt, May 12.

Well, there's this:

http://www.jancisrobinson.com/articles/a20140511.html

Note how she indicates that she had her suspicions all along. But of course. Can't fool her you can't.

Anyhow, it's a nice little story for all the Burgundy lovers who never know what it is they're drinking!

Here's some more:

http://bidforwine.wordpress.com/

Then there's this but you need a translator:

http://www.bt.dk/nyheder/vinfup-for-millioner-dansk-par-narrede-rigmaend-og-feinschmeckere-med-falske-luksu

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Reply by JonDerry, May 12.

Looks like they had quite a run...

Funny you mention that article Greg, considering buying my first DRC with some of the money my father left me. From a trusted source of course, only shame is never enjoying one of the worlds top wines with him while he was alive. He seemed to be happiest with inexpensive, fruity stuff.

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Reply by dmcker, May 12.

We could fill three threads with all the ways stuff going into (then sometimes back out again) the Chinese market have been phished and phinessed and phaked and phobbed off on phools big and small.

Remoissenet is real. I know mine was since I was in Paris seeing it come from their stock in Burgundy then onto the plane to me in Tokyo. I also trust HDH if they say they're sourcing it from Remoissenet's cellars. Markups aren't great enough for Remoissenet, anyway, unless unnatural volumes that would be pretty obvious were involved. DRC is, of course, entirely another story.

The scuttlebutt I've heard about Remoissenet over the years is of a different nature--the kind of thing you hear about various makers and negociants when you're privy to knowledgeable industry backchannel chatter. There were some vintages in the past where suspicions arose that not just PN was going into the bottles. Some of their competitors were heard to gripe that that was one reason why their wines lasted so long. Drinking them, however, I see, smell and taste great typicity. Frankly I'm not sure I'm bothered at all if they do a little blending if it helps the wine and thus the wine drinker. Certainly do it a lot in other parts of France besides Burgundy....

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Reply by gregt, May 13.

Agreed. It's why those AOC laws that limit the grape varieties are kind of ridiculous.

Jon - sorry about your dad. Here's a toast to him. And he had a point which is a nice legacy - drink what you're happy with.

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Reply by JonDerry, May 13.

Yeah he was very responsible in that way, though in his younger days he set aside some first growths for me that didn't pan out (he didn't know about storage). Except back then pricing was a lot more reasonable, with less world wide demand, etc.

As of now I don't own any Clos Vougeot but looking at Alain Hudelot Noellat.

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Reply by dmcker, May 13.

How long ago did he pass, JD? Yesterday was 17 years since my dad's death and I think about him often. I sometimes want to think he would've talked me out of some of my bad decisions during the interval since then.  ;-(

My father was more martinis and Scotch though he was trying some German wines about the time I went away to college. Was a pleasure later on to introduce him  to a number of good wines, US West Coast and European. Last meal out with him was at a good seafood restaurant in Seattle where we had some Woodward Canyon chards and cabs. First time he'd met my younger daughter (Spokane and Tokyo too far apart), so he ended up playing hockey with the corks with her around the tablecloth as the dishes were cleared. I spent the time catching up with my uncle (his younger brother) and aunt, watching them out of the corner of my eye while my elder daughter cheered them on. Apropos another current thread about hands-on construction vs. wine, my uncle was telling me horror stories about when he helped build the now-defunct (but not then) King Dome. I helped him build a house of his own in Tacoma and also at the base of Mt. Rainier--no power tools were used. That side of my family was very driven to be 'handy' in all sorts of ways.

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Reply by JonDerry, May 13.

Last Wednesday morning Dave. Was on my way to pick him up for an appointment but was running late and knew something was wrong as he usually calls in these situations, and he wasn't picking up either phone. By the time I reached his house and could tell his car was still there I knew it was probably the end of an era. Luckily, in a way, I had no way of getting in to the house so I called the cops to help me break in and they found him before I did once inside. He had a good full life to 75, and got to know his 20 month old grandson a bit, who he loved, and think he went in peace. Would've loved at least a couple more years but overall very grateful.

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Reply by gregt, May 14.

Holy shit Jon - I'm really sorry. Had no idea! I'm really sorry. I'm glad he got to know his grandson. All the best to you and your family.

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Reply by dmcker, May 14.

Jon, sorry to hear that. It's one of the major transitions (some say 'the' major transition) in a man's life. My dad went at 64, which was way too early, by stroke which no one on either side of his family in known memory had had before the end of their 80s.

I second Greg's feelings about the fact that your dad got to see his grandson. You'll only be able to paint pictures to your son about his grandfather, though.

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Reply by EMark, May 14.

Please accept condolences from Peggy and me, Jon.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, May 17.

So sorry JD. My belated condolences--I've been off the forums and my phone is shut down while I am in Europe or I would have called and texted sooner. Personal message coming via Snooth.

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Reply by JonDerry, May 30.

This really showed awesome tonight...really wowed the newbies at the table and played the part to the geeks such as myself. Accessible, elegant, and powerful all at the same time.

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Reply by dmcker, May 30.

Excellent wine. I've probably had 20 vintages of it. Jadot used to be (haven't had any in a couple of years) the king of value Bourgogne reliability, and this chard was one of his showpieces.

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Reply by JonDerry, May 30.

Truly is...a shame the only Jadot white I had before this was a Puligny Montrachet which I didn't really care for. However this was a game changer...

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Reply by outthere, May 30.

I had one of their 2004 Santenay Clos de Malte and it was real nice.

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Reply by dmcker, May 30.

Jadot's were my dailies (more whites than red, but some of those, too) all through the '80s and '90s when I was staying at home a lot more....

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Reply by William Djubin, May 31.

Ask Doris Duke.? RIP. - Montracet, Red Burgundy and Champagne was found doing well in her cave.

 

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Reply by William Djubin, May 31.

Remoissenet Montract during a great year may be a candidate, suggest follow Latour Meursalt vintages to make a firm decision if White is preferred. my opinion.

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Reply by dmcker, May 31.

Latour Meursaults work just fine. Several other great ones out there, too.

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Reply by zufrieden, May 31.

First off, I am sorry about your loss Jon.  My father passed on many years back but it was a turning point for me and my siblings; we had a first look at the abyss.  It focusses one and helps you see the fragility and beauty of human life.  Drink to his memory and consider that your making it to this moment has at least something to do with him - perhaps much more.

As for the background discussion, I think it safe to say that people have enjoyed the fruits of  Caves de Bourgogne for centuries (this entails cellaring folks), so where is the argument against aging these wines... whether fine Chardonnay (Meursault was mentioned, which I adore, but we could counter with Montrachet, or Grand Cru Chablis) Pinot Noir or even Beaujolais Cru?

Of course, aging must consider the wine, the producer, and the drinker - not necessarily in that order (probably the reverse). All the fine Cru mentioned pull at my heart strings like a harpsichordist but aging is just a function of Epicurean attributes that account for the winemaking objective (that is, do we release a wine for drinking today or tomorrow).

Do we need a modern Philip the Bold to decide on aging just as the real historical figure decided to exile Gamay Noir to the nether reaches of the Beaujolais?  I say trust your palate.

 

Z.

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