Wine Talk

Snooth User: Gantt Hickman

Werre's Port

Posted by Gantt Hickman, Apr 23, 2009.

Does anyone know anything about a Werre's Port. I have a "Werre's 2000 Vintage Porto" that someone gave to me.

Thanks,
Gantt

Replies

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Reply by JMSkelnik, Apr 23, 2009.

Didn't you misspelled the label name?

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Reply by barri0s1872, Apr 24, 2009.

yea it's 'warre's'

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Reply by Gantt Hickman, Apr 24, 2009.

Yes, thank you for the correction. What is the best way to drink this wine? Do I need to serve it chilled like a white, or a little warmer like a red?

Thanks in advance,
Gantt

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Reply by oceank8, Apr 24, 2009.

I don't know about that particular one, but I like my ports to be served at the temperature of a red. Are you aware that it is a dessert wine? She be served in small amounts.

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Reply by Gantt Hickman, Apr 24, 2009.

Yes, I knew it was a dessert wine, I am just not that familiar with them. So, serve at a red temp. That is good to know.

Thanks for your help.
Gantt

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Reply by JMSkelnik, Apr 24, 2009.

There are also special glasses to drink port. For example the one on the picture.

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Reply by JMSkelnik, Apr 24, 2009.


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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Apr 24, 2009.

Warres is a great port house. port, being a fortified wine, tends to show alot of it's brandy for many many years and benefits from being served at the proper temperature, around 60 degrees. I also like to decant my port for a very long time to allow some of the alcohol to dissipate. 2000 was a strong vintage and it's very young so giving the wine 10-20 hours in a decanter can only help. Of course if you choose to hold your port it can last decades under ideal storage conditions. In any event please let us know what you do!

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 25, 2009.

Vintage port is a very different animal from Tawny and all the other forms of blended-for-easy-drinking-now port that you'll commonly see on supermarket shelfs, at local bars, and the like. It definitely benefits from laying down for several years, as Greg says above. It also should be drunk up quick, once you open it--ideally in one sitting after dinner with friends or family, but if it's not finished in the first sitting, you should try to finish it within the next day or so. Not the case for other types of ports, which will last longer (in a cool place) after opening. And unlike the Tawny crew, vintages are important, with better and worse years, for vintage port.

I like vintage port very much, and the different styles by the various houses in Oporto are a nice thing to explore. Warre is very good. I've recently had some bottles of Cockburn's and Quinta du Noval from the '60s that were superb. There are other good houses as well. Perhaps if you like this Warre's (after oxygenating it a bit as Greg says!), you could begin to look for others to try. And buy some more to lay down for trying 10 or 20 years down the line. They will definitely, pleasantly surprise you then.

Port works well with stronger cheeses. One of the classic combinations is with Stilton, which some people find a bit much to take on its own (besides being a blue cheese it is also very salty). It and a good vintage port meld together into a very lovely combination of textures and flavors in your mouth.

Vintage port has even been known to go with cigars (a classic smoky-back-room image of stogies and port decanters comes to mind...), though I prefer to enjoy most of the port I'm going to have by itself before I light up on those occasions when I do smoke a cigar after dinner. Smoke, of course, does not help the olfactory senses, but port provides a nice counterbalance, and a change away from the brandy or whisky or aged rum that I otherwise might have with the cigar.

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Reply by Gantt Hickman, Apr 26, 2009.

Thank you very much for your expertise. I think I will hold on to it for quite awhile and see what I think of it during those optimal years. All your insight has been much appreciated. And, to think, I was not sure it was any good.

Gantt

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 27, 2009.

Its been a while since I enjoyed a great glass of Port - it always used to be my favorite drink, but its not as frequently consumed here in the US, as back in England, when most aspiring teenagers (we start drinking at 18) think they are all experts...

I should go and get a few bottles of that, and sherry - another forgotten favorite of mine

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Reply by Philip James, Apr 27, 2009.

My serving suggestions for Port = cigars, blue cheese, or a hard sharp cheese like Parmesan

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Reply by eclipse, Apr 27, 2009.

I just tried about 10 days ago the Warre's 1999 bottle matured port. I was skeptical because I wanted a truly aged port. I decided to try it and from tasting this bottle matured one, I had the right instincts. Not that this 99 is not good, but a truly old port has so much more complexity, plum, chocolate, earth and history. The bottled aged 99 has more mint notes and is not as rich. For people who like it lighter and not as dense, this may be the way to go. Or for cooking:)

E.

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 28, 2009.

These newer categories of port ("late bottled", "bottle matured" and so forth) have me a bit confused, since I've not yet bothered to chase any down and actually taste them. Are they some intermediary marketing category between the ruby/tawny level and actual vintage port? My tendency would, of course, be to go for vintage port (and ideally of a good vintage, well aged) every time. Am I missing something?

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Reply by eclipse, Apr 28, 2009.

Not missing anything really. I think going with old vintage is the best after my experiment. I now own a bottle of that "bottle matured "port that I am now going to use for cooking. Sometimes it is better to cough up the extra $20 for the real stuff versus flushing $40 down the toilet. However maybe I got the wrong one. There are always exceptions to the rule so am open to any suggestions;)

E.

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Apr 28, 2009.

I have a LBV port that I like, some more than others, but Dows and Quinta do Infantado have never done me wrong. Basically your getting a vintage dated Ruby so there's a bit more vintage influence which is always fun to try and discern.

The bottle matured moniker always struck me as a bit of a marketing gimmick. Gee we've had this in bottle for over three years and haven't been able to sell it yet. I wonder what we can do to add some cachet to this cache and move our product?

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 29, 2009.

About what I had guessed, Greg. And eclipse, when the wherewithal is there it is always better to go for quality, isn't it?

Greg is the LBV you like a Dow or Qunta do Infantado, or something else? Not entirely clear from how you state things above.


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