General Chat

Snooth User: EMark

Vocabulary Lesson: It's "Palate"

Posted by EMark, Jan 5.

 
 
  1. 1.
    the roof of the mouth, separating the cavities of the nose and the mouth in vertebrates.
     
     
  2. 2.
    a person's appreciation of taste and flavor, esp. when sophisticated and discriminating.

 

NOT "Pallet"

sometimes inaccurately called a "skid" (a skid has no bottom deck boards). A flat transport structure that supports goods in a stable fashion while being lifted by a forklift, pallet jack, front loader, work saver or other jacking device.
 

AND NOT "Pallette"

a thin board or slab on which an artist lays and mixes colors.

 

I don't know why this bothers me so much, but I seem to find this word misused or misspelled all over Snooth.  OK, not so much in the Forum, and, thankfully, not so much in the Snooth articles, but in other comment areas.  My guess is that conventional thought is that anything that passes a spell-checker, must be OK

I'm over my pettiness for today.  Beware, though, it may be back tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

 

1 2 next

Replies

0
2717
Reply by gregt, Jan 5.

Definately!

 

152
1835
Reply by napagirl68, Jan 5.

My pet peeve is when winery people CORRECT me for saying Meritage like heritage.  It is not a French term, and is NOT pronounced mer-i-tahj.  Oy.

My other recent pet peeve has to do with a wine I really like... You may have read that I am a fan of the Birichino Grenache from Santa Cruz mtns, as well as their Vin Gris.  I have recently discovered their Malvasia Bianca, which has this huge floral nose- just amazing, yet a bone dry finish.  Anyhoo, I have been at several restaurants in that area, and also in a wine shop, ordering or discussing these wines.  Birichino is pronounced Bir-i-kino not -chino, but people keep correcting me!  I just keep saying it the correct way, and keep getting corrected.  It's exhausting.

BTW, I am totally ok with the use of "pallet".  As long as it means there is something sitting in my driveway with cases of wine on it :-)

152
1835
Reply by napagirl68, Jan 5.

Reply by gregt, 33 minutes ago.

Definately!

LOL!!  I agree with you alot!

41
2553
Reply by outthere, Jan 6.
REPLY BY NAPAGIRL68, 13 HOURS AGO.
Reply by gregt, 33 minutes ago.
Definately!
 
LOL!!  I agree with you alot!
 
Their you have it!
152
1835
Reply by napagirl68, Jan 7.
Reply by outthere, 13 hours ago. REPLY BY NAPAGIRL68, 13 HOURS AGO. Reply by gregt, 33 minutes ago. Definately!   LOL!!  I agree with you alot!   Their you have it!     Irregardless, people should really know there pallet from there palate!

 

0
2717
Reply by gregt, Jan 7.

So I guess your saying that people might want to run their copy past you and I to check if its right?

Seperately, I thought you guy's had discuss this before.

41
2553
Reply by outthere, Jan 7.

Its a reoccurring issue hear and it ways on my mind all the time. A problem witch I do not have a sollid selution four.

Say law vee!

0
2717
Reply by gregt, Jan 7.

Say law vee!

Well, if your moving into furrin territory, would you like some au jus with that?

20
2594
Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 8.

Hard to top any of these, but the misuse of predominant and predominate (first is an adjective, the other a verb, people!) seems to happen a lot in tasting notes.  Expecially  in descriptions: "The predominate notes of oak..."  Allways gets on my nerves. 

0
2717
Reply by gregt, Jan 8.

So from your post, I'm implying that you don't like oak?  I guess the consensus of opinion would be that your right.

But speaking of adjectives, you guy's like certain varietals more then others, right?

0
661
Reply by dvogler, Jan 9.

EMark, I believe you're preaching to the choir here (notice I'm using correct spelling, as things were getting a little out of control!  Funny nonetheless.  I get tired of reading the ever-popular comment forums that follow news stories and seeing how many unfortunate people still don't know the difference between your and you're and they're their and there.  I cringe, I feel pity, and I want to help them...but alas, I come back to the quality people of my fold here on Snooth.

Napa Girl, I LOVE THAT!  I too will have the "meritage" confrontation, and after the other person says "mera-taaaj" again, I give them the facts and beseech them to find out for themselves.  I don't hate them, I love them, for they know not what they do.  It's like the prevalence of people's use of "at" at the end of a sentence (where's it at?  Where we're at).  It's redundant.  It always follows a contraction, which includes is or are (where is it?  Where we are).  GGGGGRRRRR....

Hahaha...EMark, you thought YOU had a rant!

I opened a Louis Bernard 2006 Cotes du Rhone Villages last night (it was part of a several bottle trade for doing a boiler service for a friend...one of the bottles was awesome...$70).  This however, went down the sink after five sips.  I wouldn't clean my bike chain with it.

41
2553
Reply by outthere, Jan 9.

I'm not compleatly sure what ending a sentance with a preposition is. But what about starting off with a conjunction? Grammer, spelling and usage these days. The only things wurse r murdering English with texting abbrvs. Wut r u doing ppl? CUL8R. OMFG!

498
2214
Reply by EMark, Jan 9.

But what about starting off with a conjunction? 

Guilty as charged.

Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa.

20
2594
Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 9.

And I plead guilty, too.  But not always unacceptable. A good rule is that starting with a conjunction is a bad idea, just as a preposition is a bad thing to end a sentence with.

GregT gets my vote for fighting a losing battle with "varietal," but I support his efforts. I've changed my own ways and never use varietal when variety is correct.  I know the feeling of watching defeat close in on a linguistic pet peeve: I lost the battle with "impact" many years ago. The perfectly good word "affect" that people confuse and  misspell "effect" sits by itself on the sideline.  (Oh, we can talk about mixed metaphors all day: The endless ocean of overwrought wine writing that threatens to drive us all over a cliff!) Mispronunciation (OT, I'm spelling it right, I checked) of "meritage" deserves honorable mention, but at least there's the alternative of "Bordeaux blend."

Now about those people (including me) who overdo the parenthetical statements...

498
2214
Reply by EMark, Jan 9.

I know I should stop this, but I can't help myself.

Fox, please do not give up the good fight regarding "impact."  Regarding parentheses, the "9" and the "0" keys on my keyboard are just about worn out.

GregT, I would like to thank you, very much on straightening me out on "varietal."  I was one of those sinners who, thanks to you, now has a better understanding.

NG, correct pronunciation is important to me.  I get so embarrassed when I get corrected, but I would rather be corrected than continue to sound naive.

On the pronunciation topic, many French names and words give me a tough time.  Can somebody give me the correct pronunciation of "Roederer," the Champagne/Sparkling Wine maker?  I've heard it pronounced Roh-DAIR, I've heard it pronounced ROh-dee-Ay and I've heard it pronounced ROH-der-er.  I refuse to make a mistake.  So, I just point at it.

 

 

20
2594
Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 9.

Emark, remember my friend Michelle for the Throwdown?  She used to be Roederer's PR person for all the non-French properties in the US.  She pronounced it "roh-der-er."  So that works for me.  She also speaks really good French, I think--after all, she was born a Canadian.  Further confirmation. But pointing works for me--sometimes I point at a choice on a wine list when I realize the server actually doesn't know the correct pronunciation, and other times because I know I don't. 

498
2214
Reply by EMark, Jan 9.

I absolutely remember Michelle.

ROH-der-er it is. Thank you

152
1835
Reply by napagirl68, Jan 10.

emark-

to clarify...  I pronounce "meritage" correctly, but i have NUMEROUS people correct me incorrectly.. does that make sense?  I want to strangle them, but restrain myself.

GregT.. you win the award of correction!  I am guilty as charged as using "varietal" incorrectly.  I think, here in CA, it has become the vernacular to use it in that manner.

I have been to Roederer three times, and every time, it was always pronounced ROH-der-er.. and that's how I pronounce it.

Now, I have a question for all of you... Mourvedre.... is it moor-ved-re  or more-ved?    I have always said moor-ved-re, but keep getting corrected to say it is more-ved.  I think I am right.

 

 

75
2436
Reply by JonDerry, Jan 10.

Mourved seems like the lazy American way of saying it...not sure there's another grape I've heard more pronounciations for. I decide whether to add the third syllable based on feel.

0
2717
Reply by gregt, Jan 10.

It is NOT more-ved!

I'm willing to bet that none of the people who have corrected you speak any French.

The problem is that the French "r" is hard for Americans. It's a hard letter in general - the Spanish roll it and the French swallow it. People should just say Monastrell and be done with it but that would be too easy. In any event, if you pronounce it as an American "r", which is kind of appalling, it's still closer than leaving the letter off entirely.

And Fox - thank you for bringing up "impact". I remember when that word became popular. It was in the 1980s when the term "yuppie" came into vogue and best-sellers were about business and an MBA was supposed to be the ticket to success. There were clowns like John Molloy who actually wrote a newspaper column telling people how to dress! A navy blue suit meant power, gray was OK, but never brown because that's the color suit worn by used car salesmen from Cleveland. And so on.

Anyhow, there were all these columns and books and magazine articles and college courses telling people how to dress and behave and write, and a resume was supposed to have all kinds of action words and words that ended in "K" or "T" sounds were considered more ass-kicking than words that ended in softer sounds. "Impact" was highly regarded and touted by many of the consultants. And overnight it became a transitive verb. It still makes me cringe when I hear people use it in that way.

"Varietal" bugs me because people only use it when trying to sound more sophisticated about wine - no home gardener asks another what varietal of tomato he planted, or what varietal of apples are growing out back. It's the kind of thing you hear from people who say more-ved.

As far as beginning a sentence with a conjunction - it's a good point but sometimes more effective than not doing it. I wouldn't do it in formal writing, but it can help set a mood that would otherwise not be as nuanced. So I do it frequently, every time catching myself for a brief moment but then going ahead anyway.

 

1 2 next



Continue to the end of the thread to reply
Back to Categories

Top Contributors This Month

847804 Snooth User: EMark
847804EMark
63 posts
1413489 Snooth User: dvogler
1413489dvogler
58 posts
1498622 Snooth User: Really Big Al
1498622Really Big Al
57 posts

Categories

View All





Snooth Media Network