Wine Talk

Snooth User: Bueaboy

Very old Bottle of vino alla mandorla

Posted by Bueaboy, Apr 15, 2012.

Hi There

Need help from any one who has ideas on this wine. i was given a bottle of vino alla mandorla bottle by Paolo cucurullo, this bottle is very old about or very close to 100 years. Don't know what the price of this might be now

thanks

Replies

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Reply by gregt, Apr 15, 2012.

No clue. It's not wine, so it's a different market but it may not be as sensitive to storage.  Supposedly you can only get it at 2 restaurants so why not see if they'd be interested?

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 15, 2012.

Mandorla is almond in Italian, so you can figure this to be something like Amaretto. Vino alla mandorla is made in several locations around Italy, and I've seen some in Sicily as well as the Veneto. I also have no clue about Paolo Cucurullo, and a quick Google provides no satisfaction. One assumes he or his descendants are not producing any more, or at least if so he/they are doing a poor job of getting the word out to cyberspace.

Amarettos and similar liquers aren't really made to age in bottle or cask, unlike wines or certain distilled liquors like whisky or brandy, nor is there any real secondary market for them. So you can view this bottle as having no great value in itself, other than the novelty that the age and interesting condition of the bottle provides.

If the bottle were mine I'd drink it, probably with some friend or family member who was also curious about such oddities. If for some reason I couldn't, I might gift it to someone who I thought had such curiosity. Trying to sell it will just be an exercise in frustration, unless it's for a pittance to a curio shop or a restaurant for use as decoration....

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Reply by Bueaboy, Apr 16, 2012.

Thanks dmcker and GregT, for the reply. i was given this as a present and made to understand that it was very valuable, unfortunately the person who gave me this has since passed on, i will be drinking this with some friends. He also gave me bottles of Aegusa 1974, 80 & 84 don't know if these are of any value and a Vi del pret pictures attached

 

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Reply by Bueaboy, Apr 16, 2012.

pictures attached

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 16, 2012.

The fact that he gave you the Aegus as well tends to indicate that the vino alla mandorla from Paolo C. is probably from the Marsala area of Sicily, which is where I saw (from another producer) the version I referred to above from that island. 

Marsala is something I have a weakness for. The usual crap used in Stateside oldskool redchecktablecloth Italian eateries for veal or chicken in a marsala sauce can be OK, but what they use to cook with is nothing like the best versions of the real stuff on that island.

The Aegusa Marsala vertical is something I'd personally be more interested in. However, I'm not familiar with that producer, either, nor are they someone that CellarTracker or Winesearcher has on their radar. Thus there is minimal market for the bottles, though I'd imagine they can provide lots of pleasure for the right people at the right table.

Please do let us know how you dispose of the bottles, and what they taste like to you and your friends. Thanks for introducing some esoterically obscure and interesting bottles. These are the types of finds that always make me sit up with interest, even if there is no market for them.

But that's what wine's about, anyway, isn't it? Interesting finds with good friends for a special evening...

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Reply by Bueaboy, Apr 16, 2012.

ohh don't worry the disposal will be personal.Thanks again and  nice to share, at least i know what i have, i have a lot more which i will be putting up as my friend emptied his collection to me as he knew he was moving on.

Taking into consideration that there were just 2000 bottles produce i would have thought that they might be of some value.

Same with the Vi del pret which is only produced on demand.

 

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 16, 2012.

Definitely nice of that friend to bequeath you all those bottles, and good that you can remember him or her while enjoying them.

Please do let us know not only how these bottles go, but what else in the batch might be of interest...

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Apr 16, 2012.

Hi, Marsala and Vino alle Mandorle (almonds) are really different products.

Vino alle Mandorle is a flavored wine, white wine basically plus almonds, citrus, herbs and much more aromas. I'm not sure how long can be aged but i suppose not too long, just few years maybe.

Marsala is a fortified wine, wine plus alcohol, like every wine quality is highly variable (by vintage, producers etc...). Usually you can find the worst expression of this wine in GDO (sweet or not) but there's some great producers and Cantine Florio is the world famous. Marsala can be aged very long, some shops and collectors have bottles of late '800 still drinkable. And the price is not as dangerous as you can imagine. I've tasted one a couple of years ago, piece of heaven... (as you can read on the bottom of label, your Marsala is produced by Cantine Florio).

Edit: Semisecco is the italian for Demisec.

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Reply by gregt, Apr 16, 2012.

That's right. But that particular mandorla was supposedly made by only 2 restaurants - and I may be wrong about that. 

Anyhow, it's an almond kind of liquor, which is different from Marsala to be sure, but I don't think D was actually comparing them so much as commenting on a wine he enjoys.

But whatever, the price that people pay for wine and spirits has little to do with the actual enjoyment one gets from them.  If you enjoy those drinks with friends, they're worth whatever you could have received for them. Just the idea that you're drinking a 100 year old beverage that was put in the bottle by people who have long since passed on, but who had tastes that weren't too far away from yours - that's worth something in and of itself.  And if the drink is crap, well, you had the drink that was put into the bottle 100 years ago.

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Apr 26, 2012.

Hi, about AEGUSA, Cantine Florio have recently presented 1952. 900€ each.

This is a short tasting review of Andrea Gori (www.intravino.it): "Aegusa 1952 Florio
Solo per ospiti particolari: caffè e mallo di noce, pepe, fieno, miele di castagno, caramello, prugna, fichi in confettura, finale croccante quasi secco, profondo serioso ed elegante. In effetti unico è dir poco. 95" translate "Aegusa Florio 1952. Only for special guests: coffee and walnut, pepper, hay, chestnut honey, caramel, plum, fig jam, crispy finish and almost dry, deep staid and elegant. At least, unique. 95"

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 26, 2012.

Damn...

Guess my instincts weren't too far off!  ;-)

Thanks for posting, Giacomo.

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Apr 30, 2012.

Unexpected tasting night, May 23 i will taste Aegusa 1974.. O_o

A nice surprise and of course i will review it.

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 30, 2012.

Now that's a fine coincidence. Looking forward to seeing your notes on how it drinks....

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, May 24, 2012.

May 23rd has passed and here is the Aegusa '74 personal impression, tasted at the end of a bold line up with some of the best italian wines (Biondi Santi Brunello di Montalcino 2006 and Gaja Barbaresco 2008 above all). Aegusa is really consistent, almost oily, with a bright brown-orange color.

The flavors are intense with dried figs, walnuts, caramel and dates, then again incense, sweet spices like sandalwood, essential oils, dried orange peel and beeswax, ithe sip is soft with a tasty flavor never before experienced, the acidity is high and moderate sweetness balances the whole extending the ending that reveals a mild and pleasant bitter note.

Honestly i don't know how this wine will evolve anymore but don't worry its bottle life is not short, now is great. About price a friend of mine, wine bar owner, have it around 190€.

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Reply by dmcker, May 24, 2012.

"the sip is soft with atasty flavor never before experienced"

 

Thanks very much, Giacomo, for weighing back in with your tasting notes. Sounds like a very interesting, tasty dessert wine or alone without a meal. Always love it when encountering something new, and deeply delicious in such a different way!

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, May 24, 2012.

"the sip is soft with a tasty flavor never before experienced"

It's really salty sip, deeply mineral.

 

I think the best way to appreciate it is to drink alone. It's like a very old Sherry only a little less bold.

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Reply by dmcker, May 24, 2012.

Yeah, Giacomo, I don't usually have my dessert wines with food. Either they are the dessert, or I have them as a second dessert, after I've finished the food part.

But your point is well taken about this wine maybe best utilized as a standalone. In some ways it sounds like it can serve the same duty as a vin santo.


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