Wine Talk

Snooth User: napagirl68

Verite 100 pt (Parker) wines...

Posted by napagirl68, Nov 6, 2011.

Just curious if anyone has tasted any of the 7 Verite wines recently awarded 100 pts by Parker.  Not that I follow Parker so much, but I was listening to a radio show recently (do not remember which one, what station, etc).  They were talking about a winemaker in Sonoma who was from France.  It was an interesting talk, because the winemaker in question did field blending of sorts... say, pulling cab grapes from one block, and combining those with cabs from another  block (or even vineyard).  In other words, not a single vineyard varietal.  The winemaker they were referring to was said to be an artist on par with the world's best.   I do not know which winemaker they were talking about, but my research suggests it might be Pierre Seillan of Verite. 

Has anyone tasted any of these wines? 

http://www.veritewines.com/Wines

Replies

501
2224
Reply by EMark, Nov 6, 2011.

Short answer to your question.  No, I haven't.

Sarcastic response Robert Parker's ratings.  Clicking on the provided link and wandering around the Verite site, it is apparent that RP is clearly in their pocket.  RP's ratings for these wine are consistently higher than the ratings of other critics .  Seven wines rated at 100 points does not seem realistic.  Many (if not most) critics have never given a 100 point rating.

Serious response to your posting.  I really wish I had the wherewithal to try Verite wines.  It appears that  the critics are consistently very impressed.

0
2723
Reply by gregt, Nov 6, 2011.

I haven't had those but I've had other wines he gave 100 points to and as time goes on, I'm finding them less likely to be 100 points to me, at least insofar as they're from the S. Rhone and from CA.  I haven't had sufficient wines from Bordeaux to opine. That's not to say the wines are really bad, just that you can have a different take on them. I'm entirely unimpressed by a score from someone else.

As far as the winemaker picking from different vineyards, I think that's a good approach if his goal is to make the greatest wine he can.  If his goal is to make the greatest wine he can from a single vineyard, it's a different story of course, and he's obviously more limited in his options. I'm not one who believes that wine is inherently better if it's from a single variety or a single vineyard.

152
1844
Reply by napagirl68, Nov 7, 2011.

Perhaps I should rephrase my question:  I am not a slave to ratings, especially from Parker.  I am interested in knowing more about this Sonoma winemaker that was being discussed on a radio show.  I think it may be Seillan, as the show mentioned the numerous 100pt wines rated by Parker.  That is why I mention the ratings (as an identifier).  When I did a search on sonoma winemakers from France with 100pt ratings, Verite's Seillan is what came up.  I was just curious if anyone has tried any of his wines, and what they thought :-)

20
2595
Reply by Richard Foxall, Nov 12, 2011.

Not sure what a 100 point wine would taste like.  I mean, what is perfection in a wine?  Absence of flaws?  Aesthetics are different but there are lots of unflawed wines, unless you subscribe to the theory that what makes wine interesting is that it is the accumulation of "flaws" that define the differences in wine--genetic mutation, susceptibility to brett or botyritis, or just the fact that wine is made from grape juice that has gone bad in interesting ways. But modern winemaking means you can dial in the yeast, fermentation temperature, material in which you ferment (sorry, natural wine people, but that's a CHOICE the winemaker engages in, even if she claims to make no others), not to mention the chemistry that goes into the blending.  Robert Parker or one of his minions loving it soooo much doesn't make it perfect, and that's the problem with a 100 point scale. 

I'm completely leary of him now anyway.  I've got another rant in me about his ratings of a certain California "cult" wine, but I have to do a little more research first.  In any case, it's clear he can't really do any better at blind tasting than other critics or quite a few laypeople: See how badly he missed right here.  This in spite of choosing the wines to be tasted! He may be right on about aging, and so on, but why he calls something a 100 pointer means little to me, I'm afraid, except that it tells me a little bit about how that wine fits into HIS idea of good wine, which is even somewhat elusive.

75
2444
Reply by JonDerry, Nov 13, 2011.

NG, sorry to go off track but of the two Parker 100's i've had they've both been great. Having said that, i'll be the first to tell you a lot of his ratings, especially these days, are bogus.

Would be interested to know who this winemaker is as well.

0
2723
Reply by gregt, Nov 13, 2011.

"One of Jess Jackson's many small artisanal projects that he pursued with a passion was Vérité. Believing he had high enough quality vineyards to produce Bordeaux-quality wines, but with strikingly Californian personalities, he started this project in 1998 by bringing Bordelais winemaker/vigneron Pierre Seillan to California and putting him in charge of making three separate Vérité cuvées."

Don't forget this review came out shortly after Jackson's death a few months earlier and they weren't tasted blind. Might be worth a few extra points.

In general, I don't have a problem with someone giving 100 points to a wine - people get graded in art classes after all, and they get scores in things like ice dancing, but at the same time, I haven't had a wine that someone else feels is worth 100 points that I also feel is worth 100 points. I suppose that's natural because it goes for 85 point wines too, but there are so many more of those!  Anyhow NG - now I'm curious.  Not curious enough to drop serious money on a bottle, but if I get the chance, I'm not passing.

BTW, from Tanzer:

Le Desir - 94
La Joie - 95
La Muse - 96

20
2595
Reply by Richard Foxall, Nov 13, 2011.

I don't think RP would give swill a 100. In fact, he had better save those scores for wines his readership is going to love. He's not reckless or stupid.  I see GregT's point about giving perfect scores in ice dancing, gymnastics and art class, but there's also just the "what kind of wine do YOU like" part of wine.  I, for instance, lack the gene for appreciating great riesling, at least so far.  So what does 100 mean for me?  And RP has had some issues with Burgundy, if I recall--he thinks that they should make wine one way, and many vignerons feel differently.

Not to mention that it's now just him retasting and pontificating on wines he has drunk before and a smattering of new tastings. The big test for Galloni was whether he was going to reproduce Bob's results, apparently. Who knows how these other WA tasters/writers are going to fair over the long term?

75
2444
Reply by JonDerry, Nov 13, 2011.

Some good scores by Tanzer...

I've never personally given a wine 100 points, I figure you have to taste not only a lot of wines, but also a lot of top wines to know what 100 is about. So far i've had a couple 97's, one just last week I need to post about. Either way, it's just a guess since i'm not sure what a perfect wine is, or if it even exists.

I can see why a critic would give out 100's though, they have a lot of experience tasting for one, but then there's a temptation to feed the hype machine and get paid I imagine. Or maybe they just have a favorite producer/wine that they feel generous towards.

20
6161
Reply by dmcker, Nov 14, 2011.

I haven't done a proper historical analysis, but my gut feeling is Parker's scores have crept up over the years, as has everyone else's. I have had 100s he's given that I agree with. But most have been some of his earlier-era ('80s and early '90s) ratings. Not since he started hiring minions of varying quality, and was being wooed so prodigiously by so many winemakers lusting for him to make markets in their labels.

First example to pop to mind is the '59 La Mission Haut Brion. I ran into an opportunity at a very private (just me) estate-ish sale back in the mid-'80s to buy a half case each of it, the '59 Latour, '61 Mouton Rothschild, and '61 Haut Brion. Something like $100 per bottle. Jumped on that in as little time as it took me to whip out my checkbook. La Mission is the one I knew the least about, but was also the one I came to love the most of that whole lot. The last bottle went a couple years ago, and it was hard to say goodbye.

Over the course of two decades and five bottles (I gifted one to someone born that year who was important to a good friend), I was continuously surprised at the completeness of that wine in its nose, on the palate, in its follow. An absolute perfect sphere that left me wanting for nothing whatsoever more....

 

152
1844
Reply by napagirl68, Nov 22, 2011.

GregT.. Thanks for the additional info... I like Tanzer myself... we just share a palate.  That is the trick to finding a critic or shop owner you trust.  I usually find myself in  line with Tanzer, right or wrong.

Parker is not an issue for me, I was using it as an identifier to figure out who they were talking about on this show.  Thank you for the info, it is helpful.  Maybe a christmas present to myself.  which one do you recommend I gift myself?

NG :-)

"One of Jess Jackson's many small artisanal projects that he pursued with a passion was Vérité. Believing he had high enough quality vineyards to produce Bordeaux-quality wines, but with strikingly Californian personalities, he started this project in 1998 by bringing Bordelais winemaker/vigneron Pierre Seillan to California and putting him in charge of making three separate Vérité cuvées."

Don't forget this review came out shortly after Jackson's death a few months earlier and they weren't tasted blind. Might be worth a few extra points.

In general, I don't have a problem with someone giving 100 points to a wine - people get graded in art classes after all, and they get scores in things like ice dancing, but at the same time, I haven't had a wine that someone else feels is worth 100 points that I also feel is worth 100 points. I suppose that's natural because it goes for 85 point wines too, but there are so many more of those!  Anyhow NG - now I'm curious.  Not curious enough to drop serious money on a bottle, but if I get the chance, I'm not passing.

BTW, from Tanzer:

Le Desir - 94
La Joie - 95
La Muse - 96

152
1844
Reply by napagirl68, Nov 22, 2011.

I was leaning toward the Le Desir.. ~$450   Tanzer liked the Muse better tho.. maybe a better bet.  France has ALWAYS done merlot based wines best IMO.

20
6161
Reply by dmcker, Nov 25, 2011.

Yep. Not too shabby on the cab sauv and cab franc, either....

And NG, it wasn't too long ago that you were saying your palate was all California and you couldn't understand the brouhaha about France!  ;-)


Back to Categories

Top Contributors This Month

847804 Snooth User: EMark
847804EMark
66 posts
1413489 Snooth User: dvogler
1413489dvogler
57 posts
1498622 Snooth User: Really Big Al
1498622Really Big Al
49 posts

Categories

View All





Snooth Media Network