Wine & Food

Snooth User: prestamp

Tokaji Pairings

Posted by prestamp, Apr 1, 2010.

I'd appreciate any thoughts on a good pairing for a Tokali Aszu (5 putts) pairing for a tasting. I'm new here so thanks in advance for any thoughts.

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Replies

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Reply by amour, Apr 1, 2010.

Im London, I have had Disznoko Aszu 5 Puttonyos Tokaji

from Hungary, with CHEESECAKE!

Quite sweet and lovely.

For those of you in London,U.K., you can buy it from WAITROSE.

It pairs well with light fish dishes too.  (Perhaps lower putts will be better with such dishes)

I remember that Philip did a review last year on Snooth.

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Reply by prestamp, Apr 1, 2010.

Thanks, Amour, for the interesting ideas. I hadn't thought of the light fish pairing; might be a really good one, depending on cooking style. Here in the Texas Hill Country it's sometimes difficult to convince that everything doesn't have to go with barbecue! This time, however, it's just for a tasting and I wanted to introduce the group to something they hadn't tried before.

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Reply by Cathy Shore, Apr 1, 2010.

It goes well with anything caramel based (creme caramel for example), is great with blue cheese and also with foie gras.  The cheesecake idea is a winner too.  It would be excellent with a traditional bread and butter pudding made with bitter orange marmalade.

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Reply by amour, Apr 1, 2010.

Actually, I have had TOKAJI FURMINT ...a dry white, with fish and even other seafood.

I do experiment!

You could read up on Snooth...I am always learning ....even at my ripe age!!!

By the way, the most complex is Puttonyos 6 and this is sometimes not made in some years, as you may know.

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Reply by prestamp, Apr 1, 2010.

Thanks Cathy and Amour for the additional thoughts.

My first idea was bleu cheese but the caramel sounds good as well. I'm thinking of something using a Mexican cajeta, a soft caramel, possibly as part of a cooked apple dish. I still have plenty of tims and it also depends on what the chef and adviser (wife) wants to do.

I have never had the opportunity to try a dry tokay even though I grew up with the grapes everywhere around me. Then when the Hungarian wines were available they only included the 3 and 5 putts. When I owned a wine shop in Oregon there was only one distributor which carried any of them and  the 3 and 5 were all there was.

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Reply by amour, Apr 1, 2010.

Gosh!...Your ideas are so refreshing......

The world's finest sweet wines are:

Chateau d'Yquem (Sauterne/France)

Klein Constantia (South Africa)

Tokaji aszu (Hungary)

Ice Wine  several places...notably Canada

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Reply by cigarman168, Apr 1, 2010.

5 Puttonyos Tokaji is quite sweet while I used to taste 4 putts. To pair with aging cheese will be one of the good choice.

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Reply by amour, Apr 1, 2010.

Which cheeses cigarman168 ?

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Reply by lucto, Apr 1, 2010.

I would say cambozola. not classic blue ( gorgonozola or roquefort). They're too strong. I have a recipe for pears in 5 put Aszu with black currant jam/preserve. Are You interested? should I translate ( I have it in Polish)?

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 1, 2010.

Definitely, lucto, bring it on! And welcome to Snooth...

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Reply by lucto, Apr 1, 2010.

Ok. here it comes. It's from Beres Winery ( Tokajy, Hungary of course :-) wine&cuisine leaflet, so I hope they don't mind violating their copyright.

 

Pears stewed in Aszu with blackcurrant jam:

for four servings

4 pears

200 ml Beres Tokay Aszu 5 puttonyos

100 gr blackcurrant jam

Peel the pears, remove stones/seeds and stew in the wine. When they're soft place them on a plate. To the wine remaining in the pot add jam and heat up. Pour it on pears just before serving.

Sounds simple and delicious.I hope my quick translation is good enough.

I'll test this dessert soon, so I won't hesitate to share my opinion here :-) 

btw. Newbie question: how can I add new wines to snooth? I have few Beres Tokaji brought from my trip there, and I would like to write reviews. I can't find them in search engine, so how to add them?

 

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Reply by amour, Apr 1, 2010.

How kind of you!

Thanks lucto!

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Reply by prestamp, Apr 1, 2010.

I had to be gone for several hours and returned to find these excellent posts.

Amour, I haven't tried klein constantia and am not familiar with it but the others are old friends to which I would add German eisweins as well as beerenausleses and trockenbeerenausleses. I haven't found any Canadian or California ice wines which I especially liked; some all right ones but nothing to go wow about.

 

Lucto, the recipe looks great and we'll certainly try it as my wife is a big pear fan.

What great stuff to look forward to; I can't wait.

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Reply by gregt, Apr 1, 2010.

Prestamp, there are many things that it can pair with. 

In my opinion, those are the world's greatest sweet wines.  By comparison, many of the Sauternes are rather clumsy.  Eiswein is not in the same league at all.  The only sweets that come close are some from the Loire.  I think it has to do with the way the Hungarian wine is made, because no one else makes wine like that, at least not that I'm aware of. There is nothing at all in CA or Canada that's close.  Some nice wines, but not comparable.

You didn't say which producer you have, but it matters quite a bit.  There are some that really aren't all that great at all, so it's a bit like saying you like "Bordeaux", which can mean anything from Haut Brion to Chateau Simard or Mouton Cadet.  I don't want to go into it all right now, but suffice it to say that there are five big and well-funded enterprises that came about as a result of the post communist era privatization attempts.   The one that Amour refers to is of course one of those. 

The more interesting work is being done by the small producers, most of whom are entirely unknown to most Americans and even to most Europeans. 

The designation of 5 Puttonyos or 6 Puttonyos is of course a reference to the sugar content.  Too much on that to get into right now as well, but don't assume that a five is somehow a lesser wine than a six, or that the six is more complex and better.  That's not true at all.  A good part of it has to do with the producer, but also with the production requirements to be labeled as a five or six.  There are producers who are making wonderful wine but who are not calling it by the traditional name, just as in Spain there are producers who are making outstanding wine in Rioja or Ribera del Duero and they're not calling it Gran Reserva, or in Italy, which of course is the reason we now have the name "Super Tuscan".

At any rate, I've had those wines with just about everything.  The classic pairing is goose liver, which is almost a national dish in Hungary.  The French buy a lot of goose liver from Hungary, because the production costs are lower.  But sauteed liver, or a pate, or a liver mousse - all of those things work.  

I don't think it's a particularly good idea to pair the wine with something sweet.  Let the wine be the sweet.  However, a tart that you might make with a buttery crust and nuts might work as long as you don't use sugar. So something like pecan pie, for example, which is stomach turning at the best of times, will of course completely destroy the wine,

Cheese is certainly an option, but remember what you have.  You've got an extremely acidic wine, which might call for a creamy cheese, and you've got at the same time, a very sweet syrup in the wine, which can cal for something salty, like Parmesan.  A triple cream cheese could work, or anything that you'd pair with Sauternes.

Another thing that works is duck, even something like a barbequed Chinese duck. 

But again, a lot depends on the producer. if you've got a traditional producer, making oxidized wines, then you're going to have a different experience. And if it's something by Eurovin, that's again going to be a different, and frankly, a lesser experience, in the way that Turning Leaf is a lesser experience than Colgin.  But of cousre that doesn't mean it will be bad!  Enjoy! 

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Reply by cigarman168, Apr 1, 2010.

Armour  ie Gorgonzola

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 2, 2010.

So Greg, you don't things German beernausleses, or trockenbeerenausleses or eisweins make the cut? And which Loires do you like best?

Point taken on the very special balance of acidity and sweetness with the Tokaji, though....

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Reply by lucto, Apr 2, 2010.

prestamp and amour: I'm glad that You like this cooking idea. Enjoy! 

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Reply by dmcker, Apr 2, 2010.

Seems that Tokaj wine also provides the best facials. Definitely, an allround powerhouse of a grape, though personally I prefer down the gullet to slathered on my face...

Tokaj Wine Just Got Even Healthier
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Reply by amour, Apr 2, 2010.

I would like you all to try at least one Ice Wine from Pelee Island Winery, Niagara-on-the-Lake , Canada.

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Reply by amour, Apr 2, 2010.

I do enjoy Gorgonzola cheese very much.

I remember in Berlin in the 1970's I had a veal cutlet in gorgonzola and really saw stars!

We drank champagne....Bollinger vintage!

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