Introduce Yourself

Snooth User: Stephen Harvey

Time to return

Posted by Stephen Harvey, Jan 31, 2017.

I have actually missed not being on the Snooth forums for some years, not sure what happened but when Snooth stopped working on Explorer [well on my laptop anyway, I lost a bit of momentum

But I am still doing a lot of work in the wine industry and enjoying plenty of great wine.

I am located in Adelaide South Australia and home is only an hour from the Barossa Valley and 45 mins from McLaren Vale and the Adelaide Hills is on my doorstep.

As an interesting intro back into the forum world, my daughter has just turned 21 and we have her party in 3 and a bit weeks.  It seems that Pinot Gris/Grigio has become a favourite in the 18-23 year old female world according to my daughter and her friends.

Is anyone else seeing this trend - sales of PG have increased substanitally here in Aust over the last year or so

 

Replies

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 31, 2017.

I'll let OT comment on your Explorer conundrum.  ;-)

Look forward to hearing, again, about all the good Antipodean (and European) wines you're drinking. Did miss your presence here, something that was commented on more than once.

My impression is that the pinot grigio thing in North America and even Europe peaked a while ago. But I have no direct access to industry stats on its sales by market right now, so maybe it's revived, for all I know. Is what she/they drink mostly that Italian (mostly) plonk, or are there any interesting Australian makers bottling it?

And what bottles had you put away for her birthyear that you're now busting out? 

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Jan 31, 2017.

Mostly local stuff - PG is still in early stage here and still little real understanding of the grigio/gris differences

Not hitting any great heights yet as our viticulturists and winemakers sort out regions and clone selection as well as oak treatment etc

But is certainly starting to dent the NZ Sav Blanc market [finally there is evidence the female love affair with NZSB is waning - although far from over]

1996 was a great vintage year here

Have had a 96 Salon to start

My oldest is 30 this year but sadly 87 seems to be a train wreck everywhere in the world

I have a 96 Penfolds Grange and a 96 d'Yquem to drink at their joint birthday celebration on Thursday before good friday.  plus a few others

whilst not a birthyear wine but we did have an Italian night just before christmas with an 06 Gaja Barbaresco and an 08 Tignanello - the Italians make really great wine when they get it right

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 31, 2017.

'96 a great year in various parts of France, and elsewhere. If you start with Salon, where do you go from there? Though the Grange and d'Yquem are as good an answer as any. Would be tempted to save the d'Yquem for later, though, unless you have a few more up your sleeve. ;-)

My daughters are '82 and '86--getting hard to restock these days and burned through my extensive (I thought) inventory some years ago, now. The elder did get the better part of that exchange, especially since I loaded up before Parker and others piled on sufficiently to move the market too far.

Am a fan of both of those Italians you mentioned. Had the Gaja last (American) Thanksgiving, but not the Tignanello for a little while.

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Jan 31, 2017.

Bordeaux specialists your girls - 82 and 86 will blow the budget daughters can do that

Had a 82 Leoville Las Cases mid last year - great wine got it for AUD480 at auction

I was really fortunate in 2013 just after I stopped being a regular, one of my partners was retiring and being born in 53 we decided to get him a birth year wine

Well believe it or not we found through a local trader 2 bottles of 53 Latour which turned out to be in really good condition

3 of us sat down for a lunch celebration in Sydney

Started with an 05 Guigal La Doriane Condrieu, 05 Grosset Polish Hill Riesling, 02 Wirra Wirra Chook Block Shiraz, the 2 x 53 Latours, an 86 Chateau Mouton, 88 d"yquem half bottle

The food highlight was a 1.2 kg T-Bone [Porterhouse on the bone plus fillet] slow roasted at a low temp for 7 hours and then sliced [medium rare] relatively thinly at the table

The cork gods smiled on us, the cellar gods smiled on us, the 2 beers at the pub up the road were totally unneccessay

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Reply by outthere, Jan 31, 2017.

Wow, it's old home month at Snooth. Welcome back Stephen!

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Reply by MJET, Jan 31, 2017.

Wow...... Did Snooth start making telemarketing calls to past participants??? Welcome back Stephen! I'm a real newbie compared to most of you all.......

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Reply by JonDerry, Jan 31, 2017.

Welcome back Stephen...you were a fixture around here when I was just starting out.

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Reply by amour, Jan 31, 2017.

Amour here......YEAH!!!       WELCOME BACK DEAR STEPHEN HARVEY!

HAPPY HEALTHY NEW YEAR 2017 TO YOU AND FAMILY AND FRIENDS!


YES....here in Miami, the princes and princesses all love Pinot Gris / Pinot Grigio (Italy).

 I served a group of them some really cheap Pinot Grigio and they were asking for more.......they all got an extra bottle to take home!  It was CUTLER CREEK PINOT GRIGIO COLOMBARD!!!

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Reply by amour, Jan 31, 2017.

ITALY YES....when...W H E N ...when they get it right......

STEPHEN HARVEY...was it ANTINORI?

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Jan 31, 2017.

And HappyNew Year to you and the Miami-ites

Yes most certainly was Antinori and was delicious

Yes certainly the princesses are on to the PG bandwagon - the princes seem to be still on the beer/cider one

PG + Colombard = el cheapo!

 

 

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 1, 2017.

Had a somewhat similar tale about some '53s. I still had a couple of Remoissenet '53s remaining in my cellar a couple years back, one Clos Vougeot and one Vosne Romanee. Had a friend born that year whom I've known for years. He's French, been Maitre d' at a number of well known French places in this town, but now is running the bar at a private club for better pay and an easier workload. Think it was his 62nd birthday and I provided those two bottles. He insisted on cooking himself at home, though it took some doing to keep him away from serving too much food until after those bottles. This was the second time I'd provided some '53s at his birthday celebrations.

Started with some bubbly then went straight to those two bottles. The Clos Vougeot was over the hill (though its sibling had been fine just before the turn of the decade when I had it with the last of my '53 Échezeaux which had been in even better shape). However the Vosne Romanee was still hanging tough. We then went on to a couple younger Burgundies and Rhones (no Bordeaux that time), together with his daube and potatoes dauphine and mushrooms and other dishes. The Vosne Romanee showed refined cherries and plum with some background wafting of dark Asian spice, and the color was far less bricked than expected. Shocked reaction that what was in our glasses was Burgundy bottled more than 61 years earlier...

Was the '53 Latour at its peak yet? ;-)  Sometimes seems like that winery's bottles never get there. Last time I had a '53 was a little more than a decade ago and it was still very vital. The '59 I had with it showed ridiculously young, more so than the '61. The '82 was a school kid, the '90 a toddler and the '96 not yet parted from its umbilical cord. What's with that place, anyway?

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 1, 2017.

Actually you raise an interesting question

What does define a wine at its peak?

Assuming no faults and competent cellaring is there a true definition or is it personal taste?

We have seen an interesting trend with Aussie riesling since the screwcap revolution of 2000.

Having now experienced significant number of comparisons of same vintage of same wine under both cork and screw cap, it is very clear screwcap is manifestly better and consistently delivers a better drinking experience.  No TCA taint, significantly reduced random oxidation, much cleaner finish, and virtual elimination of infamous flat spot.

Interestingly many friends and colleagues who would not touch old riesling are now devotees.

The characteristics that I love in Old rielsing are still there but in a taste form that is imho delivering a far better drinking experience


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