Wine Talk

Snooth User: EMark

Stupid Decanters

Posted by EMark, Jul 31.

These are pretty comical

http://www.britwit.co/britwitblog/t...

I suppose this once again makes me recall P.T. Barnum's most famous quote.

 

Replies

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Reply by gregt, Aug 1.

Yeah but some of those are pretty cool! The kind of thing you give someone for a gift, or they give to you, and you never really use.

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 1.

They should then offer specialty options for cleaning the damn things. Anybody foolish enough to buy them would probably also shell out additional for the cleaning kit.

My guess is the Willy product will get the most business. Can easily imagine a number of events and occasions for it...

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Reply by dvogler, Aug 1.

just bad, but thanks for posting EMark!  Somebody has to keep the forum rolling in summer!

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Reply by outthere, Aug 2.

"My guess is the Willy product will get the most business. Can easily imagine a number of uses and occasions for it..."

FIFY!

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Reply by dvogler, Aug 2.

"not intended for internal use"

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Reply by napagirl68, Aug 2.

Reply by outthere, 8 hours ago.

 

"My guess is the Willy product will get the most business. Can easily imagine a number of uses and occasions for it..."

FIFY!

LOL!  Yup- thought that too.  Takes "getting screwed by a bottle of wine" to a whole new level.

 

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Reply by Terrence , Aug 2.

What's a decanter

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Reply by dvogler, Aug 3.

Ter,

A decanter is a glass container, typically with a broad base, tapering quickly into a narrow flute, into which one pours a red wine so that it may mix with air (oxygen) more quickly than simply sitting in the uncorked bottle. 

 

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 3.

"What's a decanter"

What's a 'willy'? Isn't that what my gma used to call my dad when we were backing out the gravel driveway on the Ojai plateau? His name was William, after all...

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Reply by Luke Moro, Aug 4.

Ha! I have seen way worse that those. Some people take artistic license beyond practical use.

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Reply by outthere, Aug 4.

"Ter, A decanter is a glass container, typically with a broad base, tapering quickly into a narrow flute, into which one pours a red wine so that it may mix with air (oxygen) more quickly than simply sitting in the uncorked bottle."

The wide bottom versions are typically used on young wines to give as much air contact as possible. Decanters are also used to separate the sediment from wine in older bottles. Slowly pouring from the bottle to the decanter leaves the sediment in the bottle rather than in the wine glass. In this case the decanter will likely be narrower, such as like this...

You've likely seen pictures or video where someone is decanting a wine with a burning candle below...

They are using the light produced by the candle to watch the sediment collect in the shoulder of the bottle. A slow pour will ensure very little escapes. Another reason for the shape of the Bdx bottle is to trap sediment on pouring.

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Reply by dvogler, Aug 4.

Greg, any thoughts on the way this guy is pouring into the decanter? 

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 4.

The origin of the broadbased decanter was during the Age of Exploration. They were called 'Captain's Decanters' and had to be so wide at the bottom to stay upright during the tosses and turns and shifting on top of the table in the Captain's cabin during heavy swells or choppy seas on ocean voyages. Certainly no problem aerating then, but sediment was likely more of an issue. By the time the sailing vessels made it to the Pacific or Indian Oceans, the wine was almost universally oxidized--thus the popularity of Port and Maderia during that era (the Madeira often having been sent to Goa and back as ballast to enhance the oxidative effects, anyway).  Don't have to have a broad or narrow type of decanter for the sediment-removal process, though lighter ones are easier to hold and/or balance on their sides.

Personally I've always liked the Captain's decanter and usually have at least one or two around the place, for magnums first priority and then maybe single bottles. Have received a number of dodgy decanters as gifts over the years, even some shaped as animals (pigs seem to be popular). They seem to end up being gifted away or lost in storage during moves.

DV, the guy can hold the decanter like that but it's a lot easier if it's nestling in a holder or otherwise somehow stabilized (lots of people think the 90degree pour is undesirable) and only the bottle being poured from is free. Can get tiring and shaky, otherwise, no matter how much wrist and forearm strength he or she has.There are even apparati that hold the bottle in a raised nest (so the candle can be placed under it) with an axle so you can slowly tip the bottle and pour to the point of diminishing returns. A lot of the old culture of wine apparati seems to be going bye bye (have you ever seen these old-bottle nestling systems, or port tongs or... in real life?), even while new aerators and other dubious gimmicks try to carve their way into a new culture.

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Reply by AdrianSmith, Aug 5.

Hello everyone,

As the person who wrote the given article, I just wanted to thank you all and especially EMARK for sharing it amongst the community. It's folks like yourselves who really make the effort I put into this worth it and it really drives me to see the discussions you are having built around that. 

Now that I've found you all, I'm looking forward to becoming a part of this community and contributing to others articles too :-) 

Also, OUTHERE - I had absolutely no idea about the candle sediment trick, thank you for sharing that, I have a feeling it will make it into one of my "Unique Wine Facts" posts!

Thank you, thank you!!

 

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 5.

"Also, OUTHERE - I had absolutely no idea about the candle sediment trick, thank you for sharing that, I have a feeling it will make it into one of my "Unique Wine Facts" posts!"

It's a classic part of historical wine knowhow. When I started drinking in the '70s was introduced to it right away, as the proper way to decant old bottles. Obviously it's often easier now to us other light sources, but the romance remains with candlelight.

 

Welcome, Adrian. Looking forward to your participation here, and interacting with you?

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Reply by AdrianSmith, Aug 6.

Fantastic! - I'm actually really excited, not even been a member for 2 full days and I've already learnt an amazing amount. Without a doubt I look forward to interacting with you and thank you for delving into the candle trick a little more for me! :) 


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