Wine Talk

Snooth User: William Djubin

Single Varietal vs. Blends vs. Clones of Single Varietals?

Posted by William Djubin, Oct 8.

Has wine become too specific and difficult?

Replies

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Reply by William Djubin, Oct 8.

Not a prop for Papap or Dona.. 

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Reply by rckr1951, Oct 9.

Since single varietal wines in the bottle can be a single variety bottling of a clone the question is a conundrum. In the this case the 777 clone was used for this specific site to produce a specific product. Assuming it 100% pinot clone 777 it is both a cloned variety and a bottled varietal.

Since blends are another situation the label on the front need only 75% (or whatever the controlling wine authority rules are) of the majority grape . You can have other varieties of grapes and still be label as a single varietal wine. So...who's on first?

If it is a blend, I feel it should be labeled a blend.  Some are more worthy than others. 

Not everybody digs into wines like we here do - so the bigger question is this - do most wine buyers know or care about the differences, or do they buy because they like?  I think the latter applies a majority of the time - they buy it because they like it, as it should be.

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Reply by William Djubin, Oct 10.

I do agree about buying what you like.

But I also think that Single Varietal and Single Clones reflect more of the challenges and successes faced Vintage to Vintage.  whether Bordeaux, Rhone, Bolgerhi, or So. Cal..

When It comes to So Cal. Clones. I disagree. these are 100% only Single Clones. whether 848, 777, or Pisoni and most are harvested from more than 1 Vineyard; albeit a Blend of course.

Papp 777 is harvested from 4 vineyards and 4 different soil types and 4 micro-climates. 

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Reply by rckr1951, Oct 11.

Please give a better explanation of what -  "But I also think that Single Varietal and Single Clones reflect more of the challenges and successes faced Vintage to Vintage.  whether Bordeaux, Rhone, Bolgerhi, or So. Cal"..  - I may have misunderstood what you meant William - Thank you - Paul

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Reply by William Djubin, Oct 13.

"Bordeaux, Rhone, Bolgerhi, or So. Cal"​   

-Bordeaux- Sauvignon Blanc;  Sauterne, Merlot

-Rhone- all to many single varietals to name. 

-Bolgheri- Merlot, Sangiovese Nero, Sangioveto, or Cabernet

-So Cal-  Burgundy Clones and Single's

I may have misunderstood what you meant Paul.

Farming and wine-making?

 

 

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Reply by rckr1951, Oct 13.

William - I got it now.  I agree that single variety (which includes clones) may show what happened in a given region more completely than a blend. Terroir is very important at that time, followed by how that vineyard management team worked it and finally what the product allows the wine maker to do with it IMHO.  

As you well know there are vintages when vintners forgo a certain bottling due to the quality of the crop or do a blend to create a different version of it. In reality, I like to see the "down" vintages because you can see how a wine maker's process was tested.

Anybody, well not me, at least a good wine maker can stand back and let the grapes do the talking during great vintages.  It's the difficult ones where the process shines or not.

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Reply by William Djubin, Oct 13.

Thanks Paul..

Although I haven't experienced it in 10+ years, I do love a Wet Year in Southern Rhone specific to Rousilion  (Red/ White single varietal).

-and the CURRENT Provence Rose 2015-16 Vintages /already available and celebrated,

Obviously I again like the singles. And it appears to be a very Wet (rainy) vintage as the Rose is extremely light in bouquet and color but not short on nuisance and delivery,

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Reply by William Djubin, Oct 14.

A well know Producer that chose not put his Name or Vintage (Peter Cargasacchi) on the Keefer Vineyard 2014.

Although this did originally appeared to be a Storybook Vintage and Harvest.

---Lite sprinkles started at Harvest.

 

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Reply by GregT, Oct 14.

I don't think wet has much to do with it. You still want ripe grapes. A big question is whether you grow and pick to make a rosé or whether you make it as an afterthought, bleeding some juice from what you want to be a red. In the latter case, the wine is going to be sweeter and riper and often less satisfying. If you pick specifically to make a rosé, you probably pick earlier and make a more satisfying wine.

It can be the case that at year in which reds aren't great might be fine for whites, but that also depends a bit - was the weather cooler and/or wetter all year or did the whites just get picked before massive storms doomed the reds?

 


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