Wine Talk

Snooth User: jamessulis

Roses and Winery's

Original post by jamessulis, May 15, 2013.

While traveling through Napa Valley last month I noticed that all the Vineyards I visited had roses planted around their crops. They're planted and watched closely for any early signs of infestation on the land. They monitor the Roses closely and upon early signs of problems, protective measures are taken to make sure the grape vines receive a solution. Pictured here is Mario Andretti's Wine crops.

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Replies

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Reply by napagirl68, Jun 5, 2013.

Ok.. I have Iceberg, and it does ok, but the leafcutter bees turn the leaves into swiss cheese!

Leafcutter bee injury

 

 

 

 

 

 

They leave the rest of my roses alone for some reason.  They are beneficial, and don't affect the blooms, but DAMN!

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Reply by EMark, Jun 6, 2013.

I've never heard of leaf cutter bees, but that is an amazing pic, NG.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Jun 6, 2013.

NG, that's Hillcrest in Oakland?  Isn't that really in the Uplands neighborhood of Berkeley?  We made an offer on a house on Uplands about a year or so ago, were totally outbid. Andy Samberg of Saturday Night Live grew up there, as did one of my best friends (actually on Uplands nearly at the top--his mom is a realtor who has sold or bought as the agent for almost every home up there, some twice).

My father moved us here in 1967 (he came a few months earlier) for a job at 14th and Franklin in Oakland.  We lived at the foot of Mt. Diablo when the Northgate area was still ranches and walnut orchards.  Talk about hot in the summer!  We had great tomatoes and raspberries, also great tree fruit, but never had any luck with strawberies and our lettuce would always bolt.  Now and then one of the fruit trees would die in a winter frost, but in general, we had insane crops of anything that would grow, canned our own fruits, made jams and jellies, sold produce from a card table until the city annexed us and we couldn't do it anymore.  I remember my mother spraying Sevin on the plants until we learned what a disaster that was.  It wasn't organic, but it was fresh and her use of chemicals was pretty mild.  With the heat, we did have to irrigate.  My sister and I were the chief harvesters most of the time. 

Within our microclimate, somewhat different from your old neighborhood, summer temps range only a few degrees higher, but lots more sun.  I could not grow the tomatoes I do without the extra sun and the reflected heat from my south facing wall.  If we can get a Snooth offline going later this summer, we'll have a BYO produce component. 

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Reply by gregt, Jun 6, 2013.

BYO produce!  I just planted a bunch of raspberry plants - purple, red, and gold but no black raspberries, and some peppers, and have a bunch of volunteer stuff coming up but I'm not sure if it's watermelon or zucchini something else. And of course black currants. Since we're so small, I have a tree on which we grafted peaches, apricots, nectarines and plums - no room for more than one tree but that should work. Neighbor has black figs so we get some of those. That's all we can really do unfortunately. 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Jun 6, 2013.

GregT, I'm not expecting you to bring produce all the way from NY.  This is a west coast BYOP.  By the way, your family tree just got more complete.

I only let the volunteer bean plants survive, and only after I dig them up and verify what they are.  We had a very interesting experiment with seed-based offspring: Our scarlet runners crossed with other beans and became large brown pinto-ish things.  This year we stopped using seeds and bought a seedling of known provenance.  Pix soon--the beans are insane.  We'll plant from seed crop next year and see what happens.  What I love about my micro-farm is how the kids learn about genetics, life cycles, you name it.  They have now been through two four-year cycles with strawberries and consider themselves experts. 

For fans of Iberian wine, check my new thread.

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Reply by napagirl68, Jun 7, 2013.

NG, that's Hillcrest in Oakland?  Isn't that really in the Uplands neighborhood of Berkeley?  We made an offer on a house on Uplands about a year or so ago, were totally outbid. Andy Samberg of Saturday Night Live grew up there, as did one of my best friends (actually on Uplands nearly at the top--his mom is a realtor who has sold or bought as the agent for almost every home up there, some twice).

Yes, Foxy.  Right on that oak/berkeley border.   The Uplands were sooo cool.. when we would walk the area, we'd always see this house that had a HUGE tree growing up in the middle of it.  they had built around it.  And yes, I am going back many years here.  I was born there, and we moved to the central valley when I  was 12.  I hated it bigtime... we moved to a farm, lots of land, and 60 or so almond trees.  Talk about child slave labor... uggh.  The parental units should have held that beautiful house in the hills... what a huge, stupid mistake.

My mom was born in Oakland as well.  I was just over near the Claremont Hotel (on Domingo) since I love Amphora Nueva's black truffle oil, and I noticed that the old Safeway we used to shop at as children on College is still there, with the old sign intact!   I also remember places that don't exist anymore.. there was a little strip of restaurants/ shops  where the uplands intersects Claremont.. still there, but ALL different now.  The bakery with cheesecakes we would buy for parties was there, as was a dinner house restaurant that I do not know the name.  My grandma used to take us there as kids- it was a dark restaurant with booths, and we would nosh on steamed artichokes with butter and mayo.  Across from that was a coffee shop...  I want to say "buttercup", but that is stretching the memory.  Just googled it, and it is NOT the buttercup chain of today.  Who knows?

  All of my relatives are buried in Mountain View Cemetery, which, IMO, is one of the the most beautiful cemeteries in the country.  My koo koo mom used to take us up there with a picnic! LOL!

OK... enough of memory lane.. it's making me sad I am not in that amazing house  and area right now :-(

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Reply by napagirl68, Jun 7, 2013.

GregT, I'm not expecting you to bring produce all the way from NY.  This is a west coast BYOP.  By the way, your family tree just got more complete.

 

Love it Foxy, just LOVE it!

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Reply by outthere, Oct 21, 2013.

According to a vintner/winemaker I know: Roses were traditionally planted at the end of vine rows to serve as an early indicator for powdery and/or downy mildews. However, the species of mildew that affects roses is different from those that affect grapevines. Hence, the roses serve no purpose other than aesthetic (but it always makes for a good story). If a grower wants to have an early indicator for mildew pressure in their vineyard, they should just plant a Carignan vine.

There should be an winesnopes.com so there is an easy place to debunk wine urban legends fostered by tasting room employees who need a neat story to share.

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Reply by rolifingers, Oct 21, 2013.

Roses, as sentinels, watching the gate and ready to sound the alarm at the first sign of  impending doom. Ready to lay down their own lives to secure the lives of the noble fruit that will eventually service the gods, and in turn, kings.

So sacrificial they are. A glorious defense against the harbingers of agricultural destruction. What a fearless act induced by Bacchus's loving unction.

Fragile vines, sleep in peace, again, I cry out " Sleep in peace " for no malignant Trojan horse shall breach the wall that succor's you, nor any phylloxera which in all reality abhors you 

Sleep the sleep of the just, as the summer solstice winds appease and gust

 

 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Oct 22, 2013.

Okay, OT, you have your entrepreneurial calling.  Start winesnopes.com and monetize it.

Interesting that it's a different kind of mildew.  I actually spoke to a Friend of a Friend of a viticulturist who said that it's for the black spot--in any case, it may be a different kind of rot, but it's a pretty good indicator of the humidity and other conditions to watch out for, as well as the aphids. My theory about pollinators isn't well-substantiated, either, since grapes are self-pollinating, although having some help from bees can't hurt, since it would reduce the shatter (unpollinated berries that don't develop). We absolutely saw lots of roses at the end of rows last week when we were up on Atlas Peak and over by Calistoga.

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Reply by gregt, Oct 23, 2013.

There should be an winesnopes.com so there is an easy place to debunk wine urban legends fostered by tasting room employees who need a neat story to share.

Yep!

And furthered by the denizens of wine forums (fora?) who insist that what they love to believe just has to be true.

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Reply by outthere, Oct 23, 2013.

 

REPLY BY GREGT, 9 MINUTES AGO.
There should be an winesnopes.com so there is an easy place to debunk wine urban legends fostered by tasting room employees who need a neat story to share.
 
Yep! And furthered by the denizens of wine forums (fora?) who insist that what they love to believe just has to be true.
 
Not at all, but based on fact. Nothing wrong with spreading the word if it is true.
 
PS - Get your butt over to the Secret Santa thread.
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Reply by EMark, Oct 23, 2013.

And furthered by the denizens of wine forums (fora?) who insist that what they love to believe just has to be true.

I saw on the internet.  It must be true.

I think "fora" and "forums" are both acceptable as the plural of "forum."

The one that drives me crazy is when there is reference to multiple "medias."  I saw it in the L.A. Times the other day.

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