Wine Talk

Snooth User: bsulier

Recommendation for a 2010 red wine to be stored until the recipient turns 21?

Original post by bsulier, May 11, 2010.

My father started the tradition when my nieces and nephew were born.  He did it for my daughter too with a 1981 Cabernet.

Now she is having a child and I'd like to continue the tradition.  I know it's still early for 2010 wines, but I thought I'd get this started. 

Any recommendations for a 2010 red wine that should age WELL for the next 21 years?  We have a proper accommodations for storage, so it should last.

ALL suggestions appreciated

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Replies

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Reply by EMark, Oct 11, 2012.

GregT, am I misreading something?  You seem to be indicating that Togni cost twice as much as Dunn.  My experience is that the "standard" Togni has been coming in at about $80 and the "Tanbark Hill" label has been around $50.  The "street price" for Dunn Howell seems to be about $70

Also, for what it's worth, my understanding is that the "standard" Togni needs about 30 years of bottle age, which seems to agree with your "impenetrable" comment (which I thought was great).  However, the Tanbark Hill bottling is supposed to be pretty darned good after 10-12 years.

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Reply by MReff, Oct 11, 2012.

Jon,

Where are you located the Ridge is for sale in and around NY, DC, and CA for all around $130.  Now shipping of course adds to the cost...

 

Mike

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Reply by JonDerry, Oct 11, 2012.

Mark,

I'm in So Cal, would rather not have it shipped, but you're right a little cheaper than I thought.

The only local doesn't have 750's, just a 375 for $65 or a 1.5 for $239.99 - Not so bad I guess but think I'll just wait for 09'

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Reply by gregt, Oct 11, 2012.

emark - you are right. I just did a check and if you're looking at avg retail for the Howell Mtn, it's really not all that much cheaper than the Togni Cab.  Or other way around, the Togni isn't all that much more expensive. 

My mistake. I got some good prices on Dunn and I guess I just had that in my head, but you're absolutely correct, the price difference isn't really all that great at all. The Tanbark is a great buy some years and of course with all of those wines, the vintage matters too.  Some frankly just suck, some are really great. Drank an 87 Dunn recently and it was just eh. And the 99 is kind of the same - my wife isn't a fan at all and we still have a case.

Oh and lest we forget - if you're buying for your kids, Palmaz is something to keep in mind. Owner is a doctor from S. America who patented a stent used in heart surgery.  Decided to open a winery and needed a winemaker, so he hired Randy Dunn. Randy did him good. The Palmaz is as good as his own.

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Reply by JonDerry, Oct 12, 2012.

So I'm guessing the flagship Togni is mostly or all mountain fruit?

Might have to consider including this in a 2006 Napa Cab flight I'm planning for down the line...definitely want to do a mix of valley floor and mountain, so either works really. Have Corison Kronos (in Fox's possession), and Larkmead at least to represent good valley floor fruit along with an O'Shaughnessy Howell Mountain, and an Insignia so far, but not sure about what Phelps' vineyards are used for that either. Here I thought I knew Napa pretty well.

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Reply by gregt, Oct 12, 2012.

Jon - yes to the first.  And as a 2006, put in the Dunn.  It's great. Did a blind tasting of 2006 vs 2007s recently and that was way better than the 2007 IMHO.

Insignia is an interesting wine - was always good and was a testament to the idea that sourcing great grapes and working properly can make an outstanding wine, usually better than the Bordeaux we'd pair it with that claimed to use all estate fruit.  Insignia doesn't come from mountain fruit as far as I know, comes from all over and was a blend of purchased and estate fruit but a few years ago they started using only their own fruit.  The Backus is their single-vineyard Cab. Not mountain.  Or go to Spring Mountain instead of Howell - Sherwin, Juslyn, Newton, Pride are all good representatives.

 

From their site:

Insignia is the first proprietary Bordeaux-style blend produced in California. Each vintage is comprised of the best grapes from Joseph Phelps Vineyards, first from both grower and estate fruit, and beginning with the 2004 vintage, from entirely estate-grown fruit sources. Insignia is a Cabernet Sauvignon based wine crafted from six of the Joseph Phelps estate vineyards: Spring Valley Ranch Vineyard in St. Helena, Banca Dorada Vineyard on the Rutherford Bench, Las Rocas and Barboza Vineyards in the Stags Leap District, Yountville Vineyard in the Oak Knoll District and Suscol Vineyard in South Napa Valley.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Oct 12, 2012.

Whew, that Palmaz isn't a backdoor bargain to Dunn-made wine at $120/bottle. 

Anyone have experience with aging Spottswoode?  I know there have been changes in the winemaking there and some inconsistency, but where are they at now?  BTW, so that I can at least be there in spirit, and because GdP seems to have forgotten the 1990 theme, I am sending two bottles of 1990 Spottswoode to Snooth HQ for the dinner on Nov. 2.  (JD and I talked about ordering these a while ago, and I pulled the trigger yesterday at HDH.) Enjoy them--assuming GdP doesn't leave them at the office.

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Reply by EMark, Oct 12, 2012.

Jon, as Greg has already answered, the Togni "Estate" bottling is mountain fruit--specifically, Spring Mountain.

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Reply by JonDerry, Oct 12, 2012.

Thanks for the info Greg...Interesting that there's still rumored to be CA cab that needs decades of bottle age before drinking. I'm a little skeptical there, but I guess there has to be someone making wine like they did in the 80's and 90's.

I'm afraid Spottswoode has bended toward RP's tastes over time, but the 90' has a much better chance to age than their current releases, looking forward to hearing how that shows.

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Reply by gregt, Oct 12, 2012.

Jon - Dunn waters back and does de-alcohol if needed, so he's really against hi-alcohol and over-ripe.  Togni makes huge, tannic, big wines that really need time, perhaps more than any other wines from Napa. Those are two, and the Corison mentioned earlier is another, although it's not so brutal. But the 2007 Dunn, which got rave reviews, to me seemed pretty CA like and I'm hoping he's not losing his touch. The other thing to keep in mind is that the Howell Mtn and the Napa Dunns aren't all that different - the Napa version has some non-mountain fruit in it but it's only 15 percent or so and it's nearly impossible to distinguish the two after a few years anyway, so I always go for the Napa version if it's much cheaper.

Mayacamas used to be a wine that needed aging but it never had the size of the other two and recently it's been more weedy than inspiring. And then of course, Shafer makes a pretty tannic monster of a wine but it's also ripe and lush and something like 15%.  I think they really epitomize what Napa can do because they keep all of the structure you want but they also appeal on a sensual level. But they're unique in that respect. Schrader perhaps is in that category.  You're going to have a cool tasting though.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Oct 18, 2012.

"I'm afraid Spottswoode has bended toward RP's tastes over time, but the 90' has a much better chance to age than their current releases, looking forward to hearing how that shows."

JD, you aren't going to have to hear how that shows, assuming you are going to the dinner on Nov. 2nd.  Re- read the post:  I sent it to NYC so I could be represented.  You're going to be one of the drinkers. According to HDH, it arrived at Snooth today. 

GregT, are you not going now? 

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