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Snooth User: joe the wine oh

port wines

Posted by joe the wine oh, Jul 10, 2011.

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Replies

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 10, 2011.

Anything in particular on the subject, Joe?

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Reply by clifhenry, Jul 11, 2011.

What about them?

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Reply by 1 jayjay, Jul 11, 2011.

joe if we know the question

then perhaps we can help you with the answer !!!

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Reply by Tendstore, Jul 11, 2011.

I have ran across a Gallo Livingston Cellars Tawny Port. Appears to be a 1978. Any one know anything about this wine. I found a bottle on one site for $499. Have I got lucky or is that price way over the norm? Thanks, Tony

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Reply by clifhenry, Jul 11, 2011.

You've gotten very lucky, indeed. Snap it up before someone else stumbles on it.

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Reply by clifhenry, Jul 11, 2011.

I've had second thoughts, Tendstore; hold off. I think there's a good possibility that if you check out the package stores around the local bus station, you may be able to find this wine for less than $499; maybe somewhere in the $4.99 range.

Good luck.

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Reply by Tendstore, Jul 12, 2011.

Well I got it for free. So I it's mine. Thanks for the reply. Hope it is closer to $499.00 than $4.99, but it what it is. I have nothing invested. I would appreciate any more insight if anyone has some on this wine. Thanks so much, Tony

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Reply by clifhenry, Jul 12, 2011.

Tony, I didn't intend to come across as being a smartass, I was just having a little fun. However, you've got my curiosity up at this point. I grew up around my family's liquor stores back in the late 60s and early 70s, and I vividly remember stocking a million bottles of Gallo fortified wines on the shelves during that time; for the life of me, though, I can't recall ever seeing a bottle that had a vintage date on it. Does yours in fact have a date on the label? After you posted the fact that you already own a bottle, I did a little searching on the net, and I found what I think is probably the same site you were looking at when you saw the $499 price, which was a retailer somewhere in Peru (really). He also showed a couple of other bottles of Gallo fortifieds dating to the same period, one of them being a bottle of vermouth at $399. This raises all kinds of red flags for me, since I have never in my life heard of or otherwise been made aware that there has ever been such a thing as a "vintage" vermouth produced anywhere by anybody. I cannot under any set of conditions or circumstances figure this thing out; in the days that those products would have been marketed (late 70s, early 80s) they would have retailed for $5 or less (the vermouth closer to $3). Unless there's something I'm missing here, which is certainly possible, this guy is way out in the ozone.

Help me out if you can. I'm curious to know if there's a big gorilla in the room I don't see, or if this is some kind of put-on.

  

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Reply by Tendstore, Jul 12, 2011.

Oh no I did'nt take any response as anyone being a smartass. I appreciate any and all help. No my bottle does not have a date on it. But the building it came out of has been deserted for many many years. Also in the box was found a 1978 Merlot from Italy. So this factored with the picture of the one from Peru as for mentioned made me think it was a 1978. I don't know how to be sure. It is at the house in my wine cooler. Worse case if I find out its not worth much, hell I will give it try with some friends. But as always thanks and any info on the merlot will be appreciated too. I am just an old country boy. Thanks, Tony

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Reply by 1 jayjay, Jul 12, 2011.

Joe i hope you got the PM i should have said i'm in the UK so i hope you can get these as easy as we can go fore a cheap one just to try it then progress its fun to try

Enjoy JJ

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Reply by Tendstore, Jul 14, 2011.

OK. Thanks

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 14, 2011.

Am I correct in guessing you (the OP) want to ask about port wine in general, and where to start in drinking them?

I generally prefer vintage ports, but they're the big guns (including in price) of the port world, so perhaps someone else can step in and talk about what they like and recommend in the way of ruby ports, tawny ports, etc....

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Reply by clifhenry, Jul 14, 2011.

Joe, you might find it worthwhile, as a quick down-and-dirty primer of the fundamentals of port types and labeling, to Google "port wine types", which will take you to Wikipedia's entry, which is sourced from the Portuguese Wine Institute, I think. At any rate, it gives you a great deal of excellent and accurate information in about 6 or so paragraphs. 

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Reply by WouldLikeToKnow, Nov 6, 2012.

My mother-in-law had a bottle of the '78 Gallo Tawny Port on her kitchen counter tonight when we went to visit.  I told her, "hmm, ah, what's the story with the port?"  and she said she found it recently in the basement.  Her deceased husband used to buy up wine.  The W.S.L.C.B. sticker says $2.20   She said, "it's yours", so I brought it home and first found the same $499 Peru ad, and then this forum from last year.  Does any one else want to chime in.  I enjoy a nice port and am temped to drink it before long, sharing of course, but in the short term I'd like to read from someone in the know talk about this non-vintage-marked (no date on the label, just 212303F in fine print on the lower left edge of the label.  The two primary questions are: 1.  Is it rare?  2.  Is it of any substantial value, and 3. Is it any good?

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Reply by Degrandcru, Nov 9, 2012.

"78" and Tawny Port is a contradiction in itself. Tawny Port is never a vintage port (maybe 78 is some kind of brand). There is aged Tawny Port... 10, 20, 30 years, which is very differen to vintage. Tawny port is not meant to be aged in the cellar after release (it will hold up for a while, but won't get any better in the cellar) and for that reason does not increase in value with age. In some rare occations you find a year on a bottle of tawny port, but that only indicates when the wine was bottled and tells you how fresh it is... the older the year on a tawny, the worse it is.

I personally like Tawny ports (especially aged ones). They are a great value and are great with dark chocolate or other deserts. Dow's is a decent one, Ferreira is very good at a great price point. But don't lay them down and don't expect them to increase in value.

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Reply by zinfandel1, Nov 10, 2012.

DEGRANDCRU

I also prefer tawny port. Over the last few years, I have tried all the heavy hitters and I always come back to RAMOS PINTO 20 year Tawny port. In my humble opinion, this one outshines them all, especially with dark chocolate. Give it a try.

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Reply by gregt, Nov 10, 2012.

Yo Degrandcru - way to revive a dead thread! Stillborn actually!  I wonder whatever happened to ol' Joe. He came, he uttered a few words, and he disappeared without a trace, never to be heard from again.

I'm OK w tawnys I guess, and they tend to be far less expensive than vintage Ports, although it's not really right to compare them because they're so different. But if you like those, don't forget about the Vin Doux Naturel from the south of France - nobody drinks them and some of them are really good.

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Reply by angmelchor, Nov 10, 2012.

i suggest SANDEMAN TAWNY PORT...

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Reply by Degrandcru, Nov 10, 2012.

GREGT: Vin Doux Naturel... Never heard of it and I doubt I can get my hands on here in Mexico. Are they available outside France in the US or in other parts of Europe?

I find the Sandeman a bit boring, prefer the Ferreira at a similar price point. Never tried the Ramos Pinto, but will do. Madeiras are a great alternative as well.

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Reply by gregt, Nov 11, 2012.

Degrandcru - you've heard of it.

It's from Roussillon in the Languedoc region. Supposedly they've been doing them since the late 1200s, so they precede Port by quite some time. They're usually made from Muscat - either Muscat Alexandria, which may well be the oldest cultivated wine grape in the world, or Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains or both. It's interesting in that if you taste a lot of them at once, eventually you can actually distinguish them sometimes.

Anyhow, it's made by fortifying the incompletely fermented juice, same as Port. The largest region would probably be Rivesaltes, and then Beaumes-de-Venise. There are 2 smaller regions where they use Garnacha to do pretty much the same thing - Maury, which is really tiny, and Banyuls, which is a little bigger but still quite small.

Usually aged in old wood but sometimes not, and sometimes left in the sun for many years as well. I've had some going back to the 1800s and it's fascinating to taste these things and realize that the people doing them were similar to the people doing sherry and Port and today the latter two are kind of trendy while you can still pick up the wines from Rivesaltes for a pittance. Look in your local liquor store in the cheap fortified wine section.  BTW - I was there with an importer from Mexico City and he liked the wines as much as I did!

 

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