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Snooth User: oslowinelover

Nordic wine lover

Posted by oslowinelover, Feb 27, 2010.

I'm a wine lover from Norway. The cold north: "Late June to early August is when the weather is warmest and the days are long and bright. Temperatures in July and August can reach 25°C - 30°C. At the same time there is hardly any humidity in the air. In winter much of Norway is usually transformed into a snow-clad paradise. The lower inland areas, both in the southern and northern parts of Norway, can have very low mean temperatures in winter. Temperatures can reach below -40°C. " During winter red wine is my favourite, especially rich, hearty flavours from Nero d'Avola and Primitivo grapes. As the season change to spring and summer, rosé and white wine accompany shell- and seafood at the seafront.

Replies

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Reply by Becks13, Feb 27, 2010.

I am also from the North Country, although not quite as wintry as Norway. I live in the northeast corner of the U.S. (Vermont) and my state is just beginning to produce wines from cold-hardy grapes. I love the idea of drinking locally produced wine, so I'm trying to familiarize myself with the wines. They are made from Baco Noir, Marquette, Leon Millot, and Frontenac for reds and La Crescent and.............I forget what else for whites. I haven't heard of Nero d'Avola. Is it hard to find?

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Reply by oslowinelover, Feb 27, 2010.

I'd love to try wine locally grown in Vermont sometime :) There are research on trying to get grapes to yield in the Norwegian climate, especially with the climate change - grape varieties from Minnesota , Latvia, France and Canada. The challenge is that we have a short summer and autumn here.

Nero D'Avola is an italian grape from Sicily.

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Reply by zufrieden, Feb 27, 2010.

Well, as our paths crossed on the Swiss itinerary forum, you may know that I have visited your beautiful country on occasion and it is not unlike the fjord land of British Columbia. My Scandinavian forebears arrived here about a century ago; my maternal grandmother was Norwegian and grandfather Swedish (I guess my grandmother fell in love with the wrong national colors as she met grandpa here in Canada). For such small countries, I have always taken great pride in their national characters and achievements.

So... Glad to meet your acquaintance! Cheers! And here is a drink to the Norwegian efforts at the Winter Olympics - always amazing for such a small country. I don't want to burden you with this connection with the old country, but I do have a soft spot for Norway.

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Reply by oslowinelover, Feb 27, 2010.

It's not a burden at all :) Glad to make your acquaintance as well. I will keep my fingers crossed for Canada in the ice hockey finals.

I'd love to visit Canada sometime. My only visit to North America has been once to Texas. It's such a vast continent. I just have to finish some of my other travel plans first :)

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Reply by zufrieden, Feb 27, 2010.

By the way, my ancestors just might have a little bit of Finnish blood; a cousin explained that the Finnskogen nearby was settled by ethnic Finns in the 17th century. I still have relatives in that village and recall the summer days I walked along the forest roads with my wife adjacent the lake.

My grandmother hailed from the nearby town of Magnor of glass-blowing fame.

One last personal note: my Swedish and Norwegian relatives were very prominent in the forest industry from about 1920 to 1970 in the Central Interior of British Columbia near the city of Prince George. Some of these people made small fortunes and played a major role in the development of this part of the country.

Anyway, cheers, and enjoy planning your trip.

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 28, 2010.

Hate to interrupt this Nordic love-fest, and don't have much time, now, but as per Zurich, here're some recommendations I put up nearly a year ago:
http://www.snooth.com/talk/topic/zu...

Regarding the Oberland, etc., I'll think a bit and get back later.

Oh yeah, and my maternal grandfather was entirely Swedish, from Malmo, born shortly after the family arrived from there to Minnesota. They didn't see much to keep them there, though, and immediately hopped to California. This was during the first decade of the 20th century and I imagine Minnesota was pretty sleepy, constrained and, of course, too much like back home. First generation from Sweden runs a construction business in California's Central Valley, and second (Grandpa) becomes a college professor in Southern California. One typical American story, perhaps.

My paternal grandfather was entirely Highland Scots, though he was the second generation born after the family had reached California. They landed in Nova Scotia, took one look at Canada and kept going. ;-) Jumped over to California and ran a stagecoach line on the Rincon coast between Ventura and Santa Barbara during the 1870s and 1880s, though one of the black sheep brothers in the family headed up to the foothills of the Sierras and, yes, herded sheep. Believe he ran into some trouble and is buried in some unmarked grave up there, which I used as an excuse for some extended hiking and mountaineering in the area when much younger. Was hard to get a straight story from the survivors a couple of generations later, but I believe he (my great-great-great uncle) and my great-great grandfather shared a wife who was my great-great grandmother. Guess females were fewer on the ground than males in those days.

Well, enough Sunday afternoon gabbbing, it's off to meet some German, French, Italian and Swiss friends for dinner. I'll ask them their opinions about the best of northern and central Switzerland, and expect a lively discussion, particularly by the time we seque to the 3rd or 4th bottle. I also expect the best results to come with coffee, port and cigars... ;-)

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Reply by Cathy Shore, Feb 28, 2010.

I love those Southern Italian grape varieties, Nero d'Avola and Primitivo. I'm sure that many of you know it was hotly debated for years that Primitivo was in fact the same as the grape variety Zinfandel. DNA testing proved that they were both identical to an ancient Croatian variety. It's safe to say however that if you like Zinfandel you will probably enjoy the wines of Italy made from the Primitivo. Rich and full bodied, with hints of plum and prune, generally they are quite high in alcohol and perfect for a cold winter's night.

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Reply by oslowinelover, Feb 28, 2010.

California is a must for wine lovers - i will get to it right after Canada ;-) You have interesting family backgrounds. I know i have some swedish and german blood in me. I stem from glass-blowers as well as "rallare" (construction workers on the railroad): http://www.rallarvegen.no/en/advent...

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Reply by oslowinelover, Feb 28, 2010.

Cathy, i wasn't aware that Zinfandel was the same as a Croatian variety. Croatia is a another undiscovered wine country for me. Have you been there?

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 28, 2010.

http://www.snooth.com/talk/topic/preferred-primitivo/

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Reply by zufrieden, Feb 28, 2010.

Hey, thanks for sharing that bit of personal history, D. It probably seems to some that we were indeed on a Nordic love-fest, but really it is just about connections - and there are more people of Scandinavian descent in the USA and Canada than in the fatherland. Glad to see we have yet another connection - though I'm hardly surprised, somehow...

Before heading to the television and taking in the obligatory Gold Medal Men's Hockey game in 20 minutes, I would not be surprised that recent DNA research is to be found in the thread provided by D. You may find that Plavac Mali is one quality grape from Croatia now known to be a cross between Zinfandel and Dobričić grapes (the latter another local Croatian variety). This is the same as saying there is Primitivo in the mix as most growers now consider this variety the same as Zinfandel - as stated in earlier posts by Cathy.

I like these grapes too and would add Negroamaro to the mix.

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Reply by schellbe, Mar 1, 2010.

Glad to hear you are from the North County, Zufrieden, and congratulations on Norway's 50K freestyle victory.

GDP was wondering why I would be in Wyoming, loving wine, and how hard it must be. In truth, for one thing... four months of cross county skiing locally. We are pretty lucky here, as these conditions are unusual in the States.

I hope to get to Norway to try the Birkie some day. I've skied the American Birkebeiner (Cable, Wisconsin) once. Meanwhile, I continue to mail-order wines I can't find locally (only 500,000 people in Wyoming).

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Reply by oslowinelover, Mar 1, 2010.

Thanks, Northug managed to save the day. Only 19 days to go to the Norwegian Birkebeiner, so you have to hurry :) I didn't know there was an american version of the race, that's fun.

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Reply by amour, Mar 1, 2010.

I do not think that I need introduce you to MUSCADET SUR LIE/FRANCE.
We have written about their beauty and simplicity with oysters and sea-food generally.
But I must ask you to try the superb white wines
of the late DIDIER DAGUENEAU / LOIRE Valley
with your seafood.
You could order online for sure.

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Reply by zufrieden, Mar 1, 2010.

..and Muscadet sur Lie is indeed wonderful stuff with fish and shellfish! I love the almost salty flavor it seems to bring to meals.

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Reply by oslowinelover, Mar 2, 2010.

Thanks for the tip. I found 4 Muscadet sur Lie at my local wine monopoly, bu no Didier Dagueneau. Time for a trip to the Loire valley - the Garden of France and the Cradle of French Language according to Wiki.

This autumn i will be going on a boat cruise on Donau, and i will be passing through what seems like an impressive number of countries in a few days. There has got to be some wine along the route !

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Reply by Cathy Shore, Mar 5, 2010.

It is the cradle of the French language and French is spoken with no trace of an accent making it easier to understand here than in other regions of France. 

It's definitely time for a trip to the Loire valley but make sure you allow plenty of time.  At around 629 miles long and with 4 major winemaking regions it's a long river.  And of course there are all the beautiful chateaux to lure you away as you discover the many appellations along the way.  Muscadet and Sancerre are a long long way apart and it would be churlish to miss out, Anjou, Saumur, Chinon, Bourgueil, Vouvray, Montlouis, Touraine, Jasnieres and Quincy along the way to name but a few!

Oh and it is indeed the garden of France.  Around us, pears, apples, shallots and mushrooms are cultivated as well as flowers grown for seed, sunflowers for oil, maize for animal feed,  white asparagus (though I prefer the green) and much much more.

 

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Reply by zufrieden, Mar 6, 2010.

I get hungry (and, of course, very thirsty) just thinking about going back to this part of France.  Hmmm.  I did not plan on going back so soon, but all of this talk of the Jardin de France is getting some of my Quebecois DNA riled up!  Thanks for the comments - there are a lot of us francophiles out there.

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Reply by oslowinelover, Mar 7, 2010.

Thanks, Cathy. I'm amazed at the knowledge and passion on Snooth - it's really inspiring for a novice! I'm both a francophile and an anglophile, if possible :)

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Reply by amour, Mar 9, 2010.

There  is  another  thread in which I wrote about  the wines of Croatia.

I have enjoyed them on the Adriatic.

My aunt married a man from Dubrovnik years ago and they visit often until today.

You may which to become a fan of the wines of Croatia on

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