Introduce Yourself

Snooth User: cheyenne2584

New to wine and looking for suggestions

Posted by cheyenne2584, Feb 16, 2011.

Until recently the only "wine" that I've enjoyed was Arbor Mist blackberry Merlot.  Well a few weeks ago a fellow co-worker suggested to try a Moscato.  She personally tried the Barefoot brand, so I followed her suggestion and LOVED it.  Since then I've tried Easley's Raggae Red, which I also loved, and Barefoot Riesling, Barefoot White Zinfandel, and Barefoot Sweet Red.  I thought I would like the Riesling since I liked their Moscato, and I was wrong.  I thought I would like the White Zinfandel since I liked the Moscato, and I was wrong.  I thought I would like the Sweet Red, since I LOVED Easley's Raggae Red, and once again I was wrong.  I hate to spend much more money buying wines that just end up going down the sink.  Could somebody please point me in the right direction on what wines I should try next? 

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Replies

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 16, 2011.

You're already heading in the right direction if you're pouring white zin down the sink. ;-)

You might try:

--German rieslings from the Mosel or Rhein (kabinett or even Spatlese)

--Cotes du Rhone (like Guigal's) from the Rhone

--Red zinfandel (a search of past forum articles will give a number of candidates)

--Cabernet sauvignon like Waterstone from Napa

--Garnacha (grenache) or tempranillo reds from Spain

--Chenin blanc (white) from Vouvray in the Loire part of France, or even from South Africa

--Sparkling wine options (either to drink straight or in mixtures) like Cava from Spain or Prosecco from the Veneto in Italy

 

I don't know your tastes in food, or your budget, but these are places I'd start if I were personally offering you bottles of (decent) wine to see what you might like. In every case above you'll find interesting options in the $10-$25 range. If you care to go higher there are other options from California, Italy and France that quickly pop to mind (and Australia, if Stephen shows up to this discussion). Ditto if you like wines with a slight bit of acid in their profile rather than something sweeter.

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 16, 2011.

What did you dislike about the wines you dumped?  Were they not sweet enough?

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Reply by cheyenne2584, Feb 16, 2011.

Well... the Riesling and the White Zinfandel, in my opinion, were too dry.  The Sweet Red, might've just thrown me off because I was expecting something sweet, (like the Easley's Raggae Red), and it was a little dry like a merlot (in my opinion), but then again, i don't really know anything about wine yet.

 

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 16, 2011.

You're going to have a hard time finding wines you enjoy if the Riesling and the WZ were too dry for you.  They're generally considered some of the sweetest wines in the wine world. 

Maybe you do some more experiementing with Moscato?  Try to pick out the different tastes of different brands?  Or, perhaps wine isn't for you?  Most better wines have nowhere near the amount of sugar one finds in Moscato and are dry (excluding dessert wines, etc.).  I predict you're going to have far more misses than hits.  Sorry.

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Reply by cheyenne2584, Feb 16, 2011.

I had predicted that much as well, considering I'm a picky eater as well!!! :(

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 16, 2011.

Chey

Most novice wine drinkers tend to have a sweet palate.

Wine is generally a journey and you should be willing to experiment.

Riesling is a really good starting point because you can start with some sweeter styles which still have the basic riesling components and then work through to the drier styles.

With red wine I would think that if you try some lighter styles such as some more fruit driven pinot noirs and perhaps every so often have a small taste of other wines.  Don't be too discouraged if you have some bad experiences because wine is not a perfect science and you will will get bad wines.

But once you find wine that really hits the mark you will be trapped like the rest of us in this fascinating world of wine

Good Luck

ps if you want to try any Australian Wines I am always happy to help

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Reply by cheyenne2584, Feb 16, 2011.

Stephen- I tried a Riesling and didn't like it.  Is there a particular brand that you could suggest, under $20 perhaps?  The brand that I tried was Barefoot, and I didn't care for it (I thought it was too dry), but that was after I fell in love with their Moscato, that I loved.  I think part of my problem may be that I walk into failure because of my expectations... I loved the moscato, therefore thought I would love the white zinfandel based off of their suggestions on thier websites, and was disapointed.

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 16, 2011.

Chey

I am guessing you are US based, therefore it is about what is available where you are.

From a style perspective, try rieslings that are desribed as Auslese, Spaetlese, late picked, Traminer, Gewurztraminer.  These tend to be sweeter styles. 

If you let us know where you are, some of the other Snoothers will advise what ones are good that are lkely to be available in your area, or what to look out for.

The trouble with a lot of sweet wine is that it is often poorly made as it is seen as a quick fix to a cash flow problem in the winery.

Hopefully some of the team will give you some good local recos for sweeter style rieslings

I can say from memory [deep in the past as I was at Uni in the late 70's] that my palate started sweet and slowly transitioned to drier wines, probably took a couple of years and was to an extent driven by how much money I had to spend

Try and get to as many wine tastings you can and visit wine regions where you can taste some good wines for an affordable price.

Good luck on the journey and keep us posted

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 16, 2011.

 

"From a style perspective, try rieslings that are desribed as Auslese, Spaetlese, late picked, Traminer, Gewurztraminer."

You were doing okay there til the end.  ;)

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 16, 2011.

GDD - Whiich bit was not OK?

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 17, 2011.

Riesling described as Traminer and Gewurztraminer.

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 17, 2011.

Traminer/ Gewurztraminer grapes, while different than riesling, also have Late Harvest ('vendange tardive') versions that might be interesting. More spicy fruit to the flavor profile

Again, Cheyenne, I'd try the German rieslings before giving up on the grape. They're generally far better balanced than the US or Canadian versions. Just don't buy any that say 'trocken' (dry). Go for a spatlase if you can afford it. Some Kabinetts (usually cheaper) are also a bit sweet.

As everyone has pointed out, this is a journey. You're just starting out--don't be discouraged. Save any mistakes for stews and sauces or salad dressing. Any white zin that sneaks in does deserve the sink or other drain, tho....

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 17, 2011.

Love VT Gewurz.  Just commenting on the fact that they're definitely not Riesling.  Also, Traminer and Gewurz are more often than not on the dry side (dm, you obviously know this- it was for the OP).

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Reply by cheyenne2584, Feb 17, 2011.

I had assumed that this was a journey and people generally don't pick up a bottle of merlot as their first wine and fain love...

That's where I need the help... I love a moscato, and  i need to gradually find my way from the sweet moscato to the dry stuff eventually, but I need guidance in getting there. 

Thank you all so much for your help, I'm definitely going to look for a german riesling and maybe go on a wine-tasting tour here shortly.

 

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Reply by njhockeynuts, Feb 17, 2011.

How about Eisswein? Its expensive, but sweet.

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 17, 2011.

GDD - Not sure why I classified Traminer and Gewurstraminer as Riesling. 

A the cheap end over in Austalia we do get some Traminer Riesling Blends so maybe it was just lapse in thinking.  But like most screw ups I make I try and research what went wrong

Interestingly in Wiki they suggest that Riesling maybe a descendent of Traminer and therefore I could perhaps try and claim Riesling as being a sort quasi Traminer, anyway I suspect that is a long bow.

Just for the record this is the excert from Wiki below 

 

Earlier, Riesling was sometimes claimed to have originated from wild vines of the Rhine region, without much support to back up that claim. More recently, DNA fingerprinting by Ferdinand Regner indicated that one parent of Riesling is Gouais Blanc, known to the Germans as Weißer Heunisch, a variety that, while rare today, was widely grown by the French and German peasantry of the Middle Ages. The other parent is a cross between a wild vine and Traminer. It is presumed that the Riesling was born somewhere in the valley of the Rhine, since both Heunisch and Traminer have a long documented history in Germany, but with parents from either side of the Adriatic the cross could have happened anywhere on the way.

 

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 18, 2011.

Claiming gouais blanc as ancestor is about as selective as claiming Adam & Eve (or Judy or Lucy or whatever other human ancestor from Olduvai or other part of Kenya) as ours.

Also from Wiki, describing gouais blanc:

Having been widely grown in proximity to Pinot, the two varieties had many opportunities to cross. And having such distant origins, those crosses showed hybrid vigour and were widely propagated. This unique combination of events means that many grape varieties today have Gouais Blanc as a parent, the most famous of which is Chardonnay.

DNA fingerprinting research at the University of California, Davis has also identified Gouais Blanc as an ancestor of the AligotéAubin VertAuxerroisBachet noirBeaunoirFranc Noir de la-Haute-SaôneGamay Blanc GloriodGamay noirMelonKnipperléPeurionRoublot, and Sacy grape varieties. [5] Dameron is another result of the same cross, whereas a cross with Pinot fin teinturier produced Romorantin.[4]

It produced Petit Meslier and Aubin when pollinated by Traminer/Savagnin, and Riesling and Elbling when pollinated by a cross of a wild grape with Traminer.[4]

When pollinated by Chenin Blanc it produced ColombardBalzac blanc and Meslier Saint François, and with Bastardo (Tressot) it produced Genouillet.[4]

 

 

Even more illustrative of how fundamental gouais blanc has been to the wine culture of Europe (and the world) is this 'brief' list of all the synonyms for the grape:

Gouais Blanc is also known under the following synonyms: Absenger, Bauernweinbeer, Bauernweinbeere Weiss, Bauernweintraube, Belina, Belina Debela, Belina Drobna, Best's N°4, Blanc De Serres, Boarde, Bogatyur, Bon Blanc, Bordenauer, Borzenauer, Bouillan, Bouillaud, Bouilleaud, Bouillen, Bouillenc, Bourgeois, Bourguignon, Branestraube, Branne, Burgegger Weiss, Burger, Cagnas, Cagnou, Champagner Langstielig, Colle, Coulis, Dickweisser, Dickwiss, Enfarine Blanc, Esslinger, Figuier, Foirard Blanc, Frankenthaler, Gau, Gauche Blanc, Geuche Blanc, Goe, Goet, Gohet, Goi, Goin, Goix, Got, Gouai, Gouais Jaune, Gouais Long, Gouais Rond, Gouas, Gouaulx, Gouay, Gouche, Gouche Blanche, Goue, Gouest, Gouest Sauge, Gouet Blanc, Gouette, Gouge, Gouget Blanc, Gouillaud, Gouis De Mardeuil, Gousse, Grauhuensch, Grobe, Grobes, Grobheunisch, Grobweine, Grobweisse, Gros Blanc, Grünling, Guay Jaune, Gueche Blanc, Guest Salviatum, Gueuche Blanc, Guillan, Guinlan, Guy, Guy Blanc, Gwaess, Harthuensch, Hartuensch, Heinisch, Heinish, Heinsch, Heinschen Weiss, Hennische Weiss, Hensch, Heunisch Blanc, Heunisch Weisser, Heunischtraube, Heunish Weiss, Heunsch, Heunscher, Heunschler, Heunschlir, Hinschen, Hinschene, Hintsch, Huensch, Huenschene, Huentsch, Hunnentraube, Hunsch, Hunschrebe, Huntsch, Hyntsch, Issal, Issol, Kleinbeer, Kleinberger, Laxiertraube, Lombard Blanc, Luxiertraube, Mehlweisse, Mehlweisse Gruen, Mendic, Moreau Blanc, Mouillet, Nargouet, Pendrillart Blanc, Petit Gouge, Pichons, Plant De Sechex, Plant Madame, Plant Seche, President, Regalaboue, Riesling Grob, Rous Hette, Roussaou Blanc, Rudeca Belina, Saboule Boey, Sadoule Boey, Sadoulo Bouyer, Seestock Grob, Stajerska Belina, Tejer Szozeloe, Thalburger, Trompe Bouvier, Trompe Valet, Verdet, Verdin Blanc, Vionnier, Weisse Traube, Weisser Heunisch, Weissgrobe, Weissheinsch, Weissstock, Weisstock, Wippacher, Zoeld Hajnos [4]


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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 18, 2011.

So does this qualify Gouais Blanc as the Grape Tart?

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 18, 2011.

I had been meaning to throw in some snide comment about its promiscuous nature, but seem to have hit the 'submit' button before doing so. 

And haven't had enough alcohol yet (still 3pm Friday afternoon, here, and I'm about to head into my last meeting of the week) for a proper guffaw at your wine-and-food-matching pun....

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 18, 2011.

Nearly 5 here and I am about to pack up my computer aand head home before going to a charity show with the main act being a Led Zep cover band, and given I am an unashamed Zep fan and am looking forward to ending the night "Dazed and Confused"

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