Beginners Corner

Snooth User: toddedwards

New customer having issues ordering

Posted by toddedwards, Jan 3.

Hello Everyone,

 

I am having troubles ordering wine off of Snooth.  I am a first time buyer, all info filled out to become a member, and have tried for the past week to order from Snooth.  As I have chosen the case of my liking I go to checkout and then the shopping shows empty.  I have called the number for Wine Folder and sent messages on both sites.  Any suggestions?

Replies

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Reply by EMark, Jan 3.

Todd, I didn't know that you could buy wines from Snooth.

That being said, I have received e-mail solicitations from various companies, and I suspect that they obtained my e-mail address from Snooth.  Also, I know there are various advertisers that have links here on Snooth.  So, I suspect that that is the path that you took.

On reading your post I googled Wine Folder, and, sure enough, it looks like they sell wine.  I clicked on the link, and my anti-virus software prevented me from going to the site.  The message was that this site has been known to transmit malicious software.  

Well, that was enough for me.

Todd, you might want to look for another vendor.

Snooth, do you know any more about Wine Folder?

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Reply by toddedwards, Jan 3.

Thank you for your reply EMark!  I am trying to purchase a case of 2008 Mount Eden Cab that shows up on the "buy" tags on Snooth.  From there it takes me to a Wine Folder site where I am trying to purchase.  Being new to Snooth, I thought you might be able to purchase from them for as when I googled the wine I wanted this site came up.  I am a small collector of around 400 bottles and normally purchase from another website.  Just curious now what Snooth is about!

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Reply by EMark, Jan 3.

Hmm.  I think I see what you did, Todd.  It looks like there are some other vendors listed there.  Why don't you try one of them?  This one seems to have a pretty good price.

Personally, the only on-line ordering I ever do is direct from the winery.  Just my personal hang-up.  I live in a large metropolitan area.  So, there are plenty of retail stores around here where I can fairly easily procure most wines that interest me.  With luck, maybe somebody else will jump in here and recommend one or two on-line sources for you.  I hang out here on the Forum to correspond with other participants.  I do a lot of tasting vicariously by reading the reports of others.  Also, there is a lot of cumulative knowledge, here, and, so, I learn the darndest things.  :-)

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Reply by gregt, Jan 3.

Does Snooth actually sell wine? I thought they linked to wine stores - those deals they come up with always end up being sold by some brick and mortar store somewhere. Maybe they get the various stores to work some kind of deal by being referred from Snooth, I don't know. Greg or someone could chime in with the actual story.

That said, if you buy wine from a store, you're usually going to pay shipping, which is around $40 a case, give or take, and if you order less than a case, the per-bottle cost goes up. It's usually around $10 - 15 to ship a single bottle, at least from the west coast to NYC.

But Toddedwards - are you really familiar with that Mt Eden wine you're buying? I have to assume you know it and really like it if you're buying a case since it usually goes for around $35 - $45 retail and that's not the price a novice would normally pay,. But on the off chance that you don't know it pretty well, why buy a case? Never buy a case of something based on recommendations of strangers. If you don't like the wine, what are you going to do with the other 11 bottles? If you keep them for 20 years or so, the resale value may be approximately what you paid. But it's your money of course.

Anyhow, I like that wine well enough, and if I can find it for a decent price, would buy it.

These guys may be able to help you. They had it for around $36 but Michigan is a weird state when it comes to shipping, so call them to figure it all out.

http://www.woodswholesalewine.com/wine.html?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage_new.tpl&product_id=547&category_id=25

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Reply by toddedwards, Jan 4.

Thank you GregT for the research and comments.  I am familiar with Mt Eden as my wife enjoys it and going to cellar it for her.  I am a novice on purchasing so if you have any thoughts I would appreciate your knowledge.  My collection varies with some high end bottles (Dunn, Grgich Hills, Duckhorn, Cakebread, Caymus..etc) to the normal $10-15 purchases everyone gathers.  I am interested in around the $20-30 range that will be able to sit and enjoy for years to come.  I have mainly cabs at this point and would like to increase my collection in 2014.

Once again, thank you for your time!

Todd

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Reply by gregt, Jan 4.

You want to increase your collection of Cabs? Or expand to other wines? You have some nice wines either way.

As far as cellaring goes, you can probably cellar most decent red wines for ten years or so without a great loss. Whether they'll evolve much after that is a different question. Problem is that prices for Cab based wines from Napa and Bordeaux can be pretty high because customers are willing to pay.

So one thing you might do is find the producers you like and try their Merlot, if they do a bottling. Sometimes those are good bets and cheaper because people think it's somehow a "lesser" grape.

Alternatively, look outside of Napa if you like CA wines. And look up in Washington. Those are getting pricey these days, but some are still good buys and up there, the Merlot is the bigger grape and often better.  Januik for example, makes wine under his own name and also for Novelty Hill, which tend to be lower-priced. But even his more expensive wines are good and not too expensive and will reward cellaring. Pepper Bridge is another. I've had it at 20 years and it was wonderful. Ditto Woodward Canyon and even Chateau St. Michelle if you get one of their single-vineyard wines. I had a 1995 the other night and it was quite nice.

The reason to cellar a wine is to have it develop and improve over time, not to stay the same as it was, so if you like older wines, some of the ones you have, like Dunn, take a LOT of time to come around. We had a 1990 for New Year's and it was still rather tannic and primary, just beginning to take on some mature characteristics. He's rather unique and not many people in Napa make wine like that, but if you can wait, the wines are really good. Save yourself some money and buy the Napa version rather than the Howell. Most of the fruit is the same and they are pretty much equal in quality.

And then you can look beyond Cab. Something like Zinfandel can evolve faster than Cab and they can be a lot cheaper too. Ridge Lytton Springs for example, drinks well at over 20 years and it's anywhere from $25 - $35 on release. Syrah too and there are many good producers of Syrah in many different styles. It is far more varied than Cab, sometimes coming in a lean and tart style, sometimes in a smokey, tarry style, and sometimes in a big, ripe, fruity style. Fisher for example, makes one that is huge and tannic and very much like a Cab in a sense, without the green herbal notes that Cab has. Then Copain's Eaglepoint is a different beast, with smoke and tar rather than massive tannins. Edmund St. John makes one that's very much like a Crozes Hermitage - leaner than the others, more acidic, less full-bodied, but all of them age really well. I have them going back many years and they all evolve with time.

Or you can go for something else entirely. Right now on Wines til Sold Out they're offering free shipping for a 2005 Reserva from Ribera del Duero in Spain - Bodegas Recoletas. It's 15.99 a bottle. Just tell them to hold it until the weather is better. For the price of a single bottle of Dunn, you get four bottles of a wine that is guaranteed to age and develop and from an excellent vintage. It's not Cab but the wines from Ribera del Duero generally appeal to Cab lovers - they're dark and tannic and often done in French oak these days. In fact, in blind tasting, it's sometimes hard to distinguish. And that wine will be much better in 25 years, assuming good storage.

Good luck!


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