Introduce Yourself

Snooth User: ExBeatle

New Burgundian wine lover...

Posted by ExBeatle, Jan 17, 2010.

Hey folks,

I've been an while on Snooth, but never really paid attention on all of the great stuff to find here.
Been looking around for some time to find a place like this.
Since I live near France, I've been raised with Bordeaux and Burgundy wines. As I was getting older I started to appreciate other kinds of wines, like Brunello from Italy, Chianti...but still my passion is Burgundy. It's such a great place with some great wines! I think everybody should once taste a glass of the great Pinot Noir.

Cheers!



Replies

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Reply by zufrieden, Jan 17, 2010.

Join the Burgundian-loving Club. I perused your list of reviews and can see that you are truly a serious lover of the exalted Pinot Noir. And I agree with you: once a fine (preferably Bourgogne) Pinot Noir passes your lips you are likely seduced forever. You may be interested in the forum on Pinot Noir posted last month which discusses the various clones of the grape and the effect that the dissemination of same has had on the taste of New World wines in particular.

Cheers!

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Reply by John Andrews, Jan 17, 2010.

Welcome aboard!

I do love wines from burgundy but I have to admit that I am very much a novice when it comes to knowing the regions. I would love if you could share more knowledge of the region and he wines.

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Reply by Gantt Hickman, Jan 18, 2010.

I am with HondaJohn.

I love the grape very much but would like to know more. I do realize that the climate is generally cooler than that of the States, tending to produce more earth and mineral tastes. However, that is about is far as the knowledge goes.

Looking forward to your input.

Gantt

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Reply by amour, Jan 18, 2010.

The village of MOREY-ST-DENIS (COTE D'OR) offers really elegant...delicate wines.

You ought to try them.

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Reply by amour, Jan 18, 2010.

Should you be able to get to MIAMI, FLORIDA

FEB.27 you could be part of :


THE FOOD NETWORK WINE AND FOOD FESTIVAL
(presented by FOOD & WINE)

where a fine BURGUNDY TASTING will take place...an exceptional one!

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Reply by ExBeatle, Jan 18, 2010.

NIce to see there are some Burgundy fans out there. Well, Burgundy is divided in 5 parts, you have Mâcon, Côte Chalonnaise, Côte de Beaune, Côte de Nuits and Chablis.

Mâcon produces some great whites like Pouilly Fuissé and Pouilly Fumé. You don't want to miss one of these... Chablis also produces some delicious whites!


Côte Chalonnaise has some good reds en whites but quite sour and bitter of taste altough the whites from Rully tend to be very soft.

Above the Côte Chalonnaise you have the Côte de Beaune. These wines are really superb.
Very flavourful wines here. Over here if you ever get the chance you should taste wines from "Hospices de Beaune". Another sublime wine here is Savigny-Les-Beaune.

And finally the cream of the crop, you have the Côte de Nuits. Here you can find the world famous domaine de la Romanée Conti. Reds are superb here, super flavour and great aftertaste for these wines. The Grand Cru's are amazing, but quite expensive. Definitely to try are Chambertin, Clos de Vougeot, Musigny, Bonnes Mares and Clos de la Roche...

Cheers.......!

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Reply by amour, Jan 18, 2010.

Do not forget that DOMAINE ROMANEE -CONTI
has charge over ROMANEE-CONTI and also LA TACHE.

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 18, 2010.

Exbeatle, Pouilly Fumé is a different wine, made of sauvignon blanc, from the Loire. Only the 'Pouilly' is the same as for the chardonnay Pouilly Fuissé. You'll notice we're discussing Rully and other Côte Chalonnaise and Mâconnaise whites in the thread about what to match to escargot.

Also, you should make a distinction between the two parts of the Côte d'Or between reds and whites. The Côte de Nuits has arguably the best reds, while many would prefer the Côte de Beaune for whites.

These generalizations are only a start, and it gets more interesting (and delilcious) as we get into the details of each region and their producers...

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Reply by amour, Jan 18, 2010.

Thanks dmcker....I want to say a bit but must leave
now for an appointment.

You will take care of everything on BURGUNDY.
I will add a bit on various small plots, climats and so on!

CHEERS.....no LA TACHE today...
raffled them for HAITI.

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Reply by ExBeatle, Jan 19, 2010.

Yes dmcker, you are absolutely right, Pouilly Fumé is from Loire. I am not that much into the Pouilly fumé, altough I can't say I dislike the wine.I prefer a good Chablis, but on some occasions a good bottle of Sancerre or Pouilly Fumé can seduce me.

About the Côte de Beaune, in my opinion they also produce some good reds... Have you ever tasted an Hospices 1e cru from Beaune or an 1e cru from Pommard?

I totally agree with you that Côte de Nuits has the best reds. I've managed to taste some sublime Grand Cru's from this region, they're amazing.

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Reply by amour, Jan 19, 2010.

Good COTE de BEAUNE from DROUHIN is still to be treasured,


as are many of the wines of respectable shippers like JADOT.

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Reply by amour, Jan 19, 2010.

JOSEPH DROUHIN (FRANCE) ...I am referring to...

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Reply by ExBeatle, Jan 19, 2010.

Amour, Drouhin and Jadot are big wineries. They're quite good but you should try others like Dugat-py, Jacques Frédéric Mugnier, Etienne Sauzet, Comte de Vogüé, Domaine Leroy, Armand Rousseau, Philippe Charlopin...

If you can find them, try David Duband wines, he's the rising star of the Côte de Nuits and they're still very affordable. His Nuits-St-Georges 1e Cru's are amaaaaaaazing!

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Reply by amour, Jan 19, 2010.

Thanks.

You are so right.

My sommelier friend from TAILLEVENT RESTAURANT/PARIS has suggested some
which I would look into when I go to FRANCE late this year !

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 19, 2010.

Coincidentally I had an excellent Pouilly-Fumé from Francis Blanchet last night, which he labels "Cuvée Silice". Flinty, ladyfinger-smoke nose, along with aromas of whitish flowers and lemon zest. Medium weight, lively juiciness in the mouth, with white peaches, a hint of lychee, some citrus and white pepper on the palate. Very refreshing and well balanced.

I like both sauvignon blanc (except too many from New Zealand, or California wineries that want to jump on that bandwagon) and chardonnay, though I'm willing to pay more for chardonnay since that's what the market demands. Both have their places in my meal day or week or month.

For the red I had another from the Loire, this one, interestingly enough, a pinot noir. A Sancerre rouge from Domaine Vacheron. It was a 2007, so very young, but I enjoyed the playfully earthy minerality, so common in Sancerre blanc. It's hard to find Sancerre rouge in Tokyo, though I've had it several times in Paris. This one wasn't so far from a Savigny-lès-Beaune, or a village-level Chambolle.

Dark berries on the nose (particularly cherries and raspberries) as well as cinnamon and cloves. Medium mouthfeel but with a cutting energy that rushes more berries and pomegranate to the palate. Slightly sour cherry and pepper (again, the sancerre terroir) on the finish.

Both the wines were excellent with shellfish and a stuffed roast capon. Can't really ask for more...

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Reply by amour, Jan 20, 2010.

As other Snooth- posters have said, there are new boys
on the block!

Yes...Burgundy is full of exciting developments and I have kept up !

As a rule, I do not like to chatter
about wines which people cannot find easily.
It depends on the audience....
If people are visiting BURGUNDY, surely, they
should visit DOMAINE de SUREMAIN in COTE de BEAUNE.
I drank their quite aromatic DOMAINE de SUREMAIN MONTTELIE 1 er Cru 2006.
They also make good Rully1er.
They farm organically as well.

Other small ones of note are:
RAMONET....BIG BIG WINES...unlike the usual delicate BURGUNDY stars, but stars nevertheless !!!(CHASSANE-MONTRACHET)

Then, there are those very mineral wines of the late GUY ROULOT and
son JEAN-MARC.

There is LEROY, ARMAND ROUSSEAU, De VOGUE(Chambolle-Musigny).

Last but not least on my long list.......THE LADY OF WINE....ANNE GROS (VOSNE-ROMANEE) EXPENSIVE.....I have read an article about her work...no first
growths....small estate.....pure and succulent wines...I am told.EXPENSIVE.


OOPS....THE LAFARGE FAMILY.......again biodynamic.....Clos des Chenes(VOLNAY)
fragrant,elegant and affordable!
I had the pleasure of their wine....quite minerally and refined as well.....
but not well-priced at all !!

CHEERS!




GUY ROULOT and son JEAN-MARC are great (MEURSAULT)...I do not talk a lot about
them as they are over-priced by any computation!!

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Reply by ExBeatle, Jan 20, 2010.

dmcker, have you ever tried Dagueneau? Last year I managed to get a bottle of Buisson Renard from my wife's uncle. I was amazed of the purity of this wine as I was amazed by the price. Like I said I can much appreciate a Sauvignon, but for me the top in white wine is Chevalier-Montrachet and Corton-Charlemagne.... Why are Burgundy wines sooo expensive brrrrrr :-)

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Reply by amour, Jan 20, 2010.

You must read my poems to DIDIER DAGUENEAU and his children Charlotte and Louis-Benjamin.

And you must taste his "LES JARDINS de BABYLONE"...a JURANCON so sweet..
YOU WOULD HAVE FOUND THE HOLY GRAIL ! (FROM A PLOT NEAR THE FOOT OF THE PYRENEES)

I drink his SILEX, PUR SANG and BUISSON RENARD which is really from BUISSON MENARD...he was so eccentric and avant-garde that he allowed the mis-spelling to
go forward.
He was so provocative and actually loved people and
was a most meticulous winemaker.
It is a pity he died so young ...merely in his fifties.
I am looking forward to seeing LOUIS in FRANCE
later this year.
St.Andelain, the LOIRE VALLEY and the world lost a great man. R.I.P.

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Reply by VegasOenophile, Jan 22, 2010.

I myself am a fan of Burgundian wines. I am curious lately to try reds from the areas known more for their chardonnay, like Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet. I have found all the French pinots can vary from area to area and even producer to producer, but that's the fun of trying many! I even very much enjoy the base-level "Bourgogne" wines without any designation. There's just something special and unique about the Burgundy wines, that the French terroir offers. Would most agree that in addition to the deep, complex flavors and the usual cherry and strawberry tones that the French pinots have a level or earth to them (some might call gaminess) that really adds a whole other level?

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Reply by zufrieden, Jan 22, 2010.

Yes, long live Burgundy!


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