Wine Talk

Snooth User: zufrieden

Is your choice of white or red wine affected by the weather?

Posted by zufrieden, Nov 13.

I find that the presence or absence of sunshine affects my choice of wine.  Sunny days encourage me to select a soft white; a colder, blustery day has me reaching for a hearty red.  Anyone else suffer from weather-affected wine-drinking disorders?

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 13.

We are enjoying an unusual sunny spell in the Pacific Northwest - but are now experiencing overnight (light) frosts.  At night, one moves, therefore, closer to the fire or heat source and I - for one - look for a Cabernet to warm the innards.  During the day - assuming I actually want to drink something - I usually feel like celebrating the declining sun with a glass of white - either a Mosel (Riesling) or a Chardonnay (Chablis).  However, yesterday I plugged for a Chenin Blanc from Vouvray - an excellent example from Champalou.

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Reply by rckr1951, Nov 13.

Not really - I drink an equal number of both whites and reds regardless of the seasonal temps.  I think bright whites help to lift up the dreariness of gray, cold days and rich reds around the bonfire at night are just what the doctor ordered.

Sadly there are many around here that have gone through my low level wine course and think the same way now.  On the other hand we know exactly what to expect from each other so we're good with that..

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Reply by Really Big Al, Nov 13.

My wife Sandra thinks that the food pairing is the primary reason for choosing a white or red wine, followed by the weather.  That said, we generally drink mostly red wines.

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Reply by Lucha Vino, Nov 13.

I think temperature influences my wine selection.  If it is hot I will reach for a white, or rose.  When the temperatures drop I will reach for a red, or a rose.

So, not matter what the weather - it is always time for Rose' at my house!

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 13.

Yes, Rose is good for almost any occasion, isn't it?... excluding, perhaps those sweeties of the past made in bulk somewhere in the Central Valley of California.  I can drink any wine with any weather, but find the cooler weather usually has me reaching for the heartier reds.  The generally cooled down whites probably appeal during the summer months along with, as is rightly pointed out, a fine rose.

Food pairing is probably paramount as well, but then we might sometimes choose food on the basis of the weather as well, one supposes.

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Reply by RandyFisher, Nov 14.

We drink both reds and whites year round. If I'm going to be outdoors, I generally will drink a lighter red.

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Reply by vin0vin0, Nov 14.

Our wine choice is mainly decided by what we're eating. Heck we even drink rose year round if it pairs well with the meal.

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Reply by jackwerickson, Nov 14.

Never thought of weather influencing my drinking habits but must admit I drink a lot of rose in the summer, but not in the winter 

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Reply by EMark, Nov 14.

Like many, here, our wine preference is, pretty much, weather agnostic.  On the other hand. of course, living where we live, many might argue that there really isn't that much seasonal change in the weather.  I'm usually a red wine drinker,  My wife is usually a white wine drinker.  Even the menu, usually, does not affect our preferences.  On the other hand, I do prefer white wine with most shellfish dishes.

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 14.

I suppose that's the thing with living with four distinct seasons; if you live in Southern California or Southern Florida - or even the Southwest - weather can be quite balmy (even hot) in the winter.  Thus, one simply adapts and the drinking becomes geared to the palate rather than the needle pricks of Old Man Winter.  I confess, however, that we don't have winter (in the usual, continental sense of the word) in the Pacific Northwest - unless you get close to the Alaskan Panhandle.

If you live in the interior of the Northern US or Canada (in general, though not the SW coast of BC), your body rhythms will change with the temperature and the onset of snow. That could encourage a weather effect in drinking.  For example, it is about 14 degrees today (57.2 F) which is fairly mild for mid-November.  After running for an hour I was actually dying for a decent beer.  But that's another story entirely.

Z.

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Reply by GregT, Nov 15.

When I lived in the east and midwest, weather did affect my choices to some extent, but I do remember having big red Zins on scorching days with spicy BBQ. Probably not a good match in any direction.

Then I was talking to a friend who was coming over for some wine and I suggested whites. He said no, that's what air conditioning is for - so you can drink reds all the time.

Seemed logical.

These days, living somewhere with lots of sun, I probably drink 30% whites and rosés, often as not opened after dinner and a bottle of red.

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 15.

If you are living in the California Republic as I think I heard you were, @GT, just make sure you locate where the completely foreseable fire problem is at its least probable.  We don't want those kind of weather-related issues to affect your safety or your drinking preferences.

Anyway, It is nice to see you check in.  We hope to see more of you.  I am also dabbling in the sites of some of the snooth diaspora as well, but almost think if I help take this site off life support I should be given a stipend.  Seems fair enough, doesn't it?

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Reply by GregT, Nov 16.

Indeed! And I can see the smoke in the air. I'm in north LA and the fires are to the west. JD is closer.

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 16.

Well, keep a fire bucket handy - just in case.  Or a gasmask.  Maybe a firehose in the case of JD..

Cheers.

 

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Reply by LindeMen, Nov 18.

Haven't thought much about weather but no, just drinking dark red so far as I heard they are  best for combating cholesterol.    Not as sophisticated as you guys,  but I sure like reading all the beautiful descriptions of notes and sensations you all have about the various wines as they roll of your tongues- hope I get to that point with sensational awareness.  

At this point if I had to guess I would drink red when eating Burger King, and white while chowing down at Panera Bread- sophistication is key.

 

Terrible about those fires too.

 

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 18.

The fires are, indeed no joke... people have died.  The thing that riles me is that this was all so, so predictable - we knew this was coming as long ago as 30 years.  The town of Paradise is a perfect example of tragedy - many retirees died needlessly.  Now, I hear that where one of my first cousins lived in Calabasas is under considerable fire stress as well (he has since moved to Palm Springs, receiving the heat in a more tolerable form - from the sun).

This is not the weather-related drinking effect we were thinking of at all, but it is worth mentioning because real people have expired as a result, never to return, unless you follow a Vedantic religion or something of that ilk.

Anyway, most sophistication is just a dance, so keep adding your remarks, @Lindemen!

 

Z.

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Reply by duncan 906, Nov 21.

I saw about the fires on TV and I thought it a sad business but a lot of the reports concentrated on the reactions of the US president.. Anyway-to the subject in hand. My choice of wine is usually dictated by what I am eating and not by the weather. However in winter I do have more meat stews which means red wines while in the summer I do have more lighter dishes which could mean a white or a rose

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 21.

Yes, that seems to be the general concensus... that is, that the weather probably drives your appetite to some degree which then determines - again to some degree, depending on taste - your choice of wine.  This assumes a lot of things about your drinking habits, budget, etc., but we are just talking in generalities.  Red wine shoukld be slightly chilled during the warmer temperatures anyway since serving above 20 degrees C. (or 68 F) seems to make most wines taste on the "flabby" side.  Good serving temperatures for a fine red (one you drink more infrequently, and tend to drink, therefore, at one sitting) are closer to 15 degrees or 16 degrees C (or about 60 F).

So lots of things going on with the weather, but then we have yet to talk about the psychology of choice - assuming, as is inductively sensible, that there is such a study.

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Reply by duncan 906, Nov 21.

A lot of this idea of roasts and stews in colder weather and salads and lighter foods in summer climes goes back many generations to a time when most people lived a lot closert to the land than we do now. There would have only been a limited. amount of animal feed to keep livestock through the winter when there was no grazing so just before Christmas there would have been a big cull. Hence stews and roasts in winter and the big feast at Christmas.Meat not eaten straight away would have been pickled or salted down as there was no refridgeration. In summer the vegetable garden would have provided tomatoes,cucumbers and lettice hence salads are often thought of as summer eating Nowadays of course we do have refridgeration and we can import foodstuffs from other parts of the world where the climate is different.

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Reply by zufrieden, Nov 21.

Quite right.  How far we've come, so there is progress - despite the post-modern detractors of same.  Your post is an excellent reminder of how we've lived before and how recently this life prevailed.  Drink would have been appropriately chosen as well, according to your recounting of the recent past... probably a primitive drink with grains floating in the midst of a cloudy ale...

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