Wine & Food

Snooth User: lvcomplex

I need your help!

Posted by lvcomplex, May 8, 2013.

I am serving a Cream of Kalamata Olive soup with avocados, cream, a bit of butter, white vermouth, chicken broth and a bit of vinegar. What wine would you recommend with this soup? It is served warm. Also, it doesn't say what kind of vinegar to use and I'm thinking sherry. what do you think?

Replies

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Reply by Dre1963, May 10, 2013.

A lot of "cream" and "butter", so I would choose for a wine with enough acidity, I was thinking of a Savignon Blanc (unoaked) or even a fresh Pinot Grigio.

About hte vinegar, I would use a Balsamico vinegar.

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Reply by Welkja, May 10, 2013.

LVCOMPLEX,

Have you tried using a wine app for finding pairings such as Wine Stein. You basically type in the ingredients of your recipe and it gives you a list of recommendations that are listed from most appropriate to least appropriate wine. I've tried it once when I wasn't sure what wine to serve and it did pick one that went well with my recipe. It will give you a variety and region for the wine pairing, you must pick the winery that  makes it.

WELKJA

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Reply by Chef Byron, May 10, 2013.

Olive Soup? Choose a Spanish Verdejo from D.O. Rueda, Palacio de Bornos! Be sure you garnish that soup with some fresh chives!

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Reply by JenniferT, May 10, 2013.

I never answered this one because I was stumped, but I can imagine the Verdejo being a good pairing! 

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Reply by Welkja, May 11, 2013.

JENNIFERT,

Verdejo is a white variety of grape from the area of Rueda, Spain. I am not real familiar with it but it has apple and pear flavors as well as some spices. It could possibly go with this type of soup. I would of tried a Pinot Grigio from Alto Adige myself from northern Italy. It was hard to pair so many different strong flavors in this recipe.

WELKJA

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Reply by gregt, May 11, 2013.

Well the strong flavors will be the olives, vermouth, and vinegar, so you need something that works. Verdejo can be much like Sauv Blanc, with some herbal notes as well as citrus notes, so that could be OK. I guess I wouldn't get something really floral and I'd stick with something pretty crisp, although wine and soup isn't something I really do - liquid to liquid. If I were to do that, I'd probably go with a fino sherry rather than try to match a still wine.

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Reply by JenniferT, May 11, 2013.

I've only had one Verdejo before - from Naia in Rueda. I really loved it though. It wasn't really like anything else I've ever had before. 

In my limited experience I've found Albarino was a litter lighter/crisper than Verdejo - which was slightly richer, with more body and depth. There is a wine from the Okanagan called Fandango from TerraVista Vineyards that is an Albarino/Verdejo blend. I'd venture to guess that it might be a good pick if you are going down the Verdejo road. It is indeed super citrusy! Regardless I thought it was a well done wine, really interesting. I'm doubtful that it would be easy to find outside Canada though.

I really like the idea of doing a Pinot Grigio from Alto Adige with this dish as well.

Lvcomplex - It would be neat to hear what you tried pairing and how things worked out.

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Reply by lvcomplex, May 11, 2013.

Thanks everyone for your prompt and thoughtful responses. I have been trying to locate some of your suggestions. I am thinking of trying the Peter Zemmer La Lot Pinot Grigio Alto Adige as I have been able to find it locally. I can't find the Verdejo or the Fandango here.

Some of you have said the Verdejo is similar to Sauv Blanc, which we really like. Are there any of these you would recommend?

I will be sure to post how the meal and wines worked out.  The main course is a grilled chicken with green olive and sundried tomato olivada. I am thinking an unoaked Chardonnay would work well, such as Ardeche from Louis Latour. What do you think?

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Reply by JenniferT, May 11, 2013.

I didn't think you would be able to find Fandango - I'm not sure if it is sold outside British Columbia.

Verdejo on the other hand is a fairly common white Spanish wine grape, but still hard to find in some stores (like where I live). Sometimes the same grape is grown elsewhere - as with the Fandango (in which the Verdejo grapes are grown in BC!). The Fandango is blended with Albarino grapes anyway.

Naia is the only verdejo I've had thus far (it's from Rueda in Spain - a major region for that kind of grape), but I'm sure that other people will have better recommendations that you're more likely to find. A wine made from Albarino might be interesting for you to try too.

I like the idea of using an unoaked chardonnay, but I'm unfamiliar with Ardeche. (Again, I'm new to this so I'm sure you will get more insightful comments from other snoothers).

Good luck with your dinner! It sounds wonderful. 

 

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Reply by EMark, May 11, 2013.

LV, with the meal you are preparing, I don't think you have to worry too much about the wines that you are serving.  You guests are going to be well treated.

That being said, I am going to suggest that you think about a red wine to go with your grilled chicken entree.  I think sundried tomato and olive accompaniment might appreciate a sturdier wine.  I'm thinking a Chianti would work.  [Full disclosure:  I'm pretty much a red wine bigot.]

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Reply by lvcomplex, May 11, 2013.

Thanks Jennifer. I tried the Ardeche at a Chardonnay wine-tasting recently. It was chosen as the purest form of Chardonnay in that it is not manipulated. It is from Burgundy.

Mark, I too, prefer red wines and would entertain ideas in that direction as well as whites. I want a wine that will not compete for attention, but simply enhance the flavors, or rather, showcase the flavors of the food, if possible.

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Reply by gregt, May 12, 2013.

LV - Verdejo is mostly from Rueda, which is near Toro but which is a white grape region. It was pretty much forgotten and what there was used to be made into an oxidized type of wine, but then people started looking at it more seriously after Franco's death and they found out that it can make a pretty good wine. 

The reason people compare it to Sauv Blanc is because it has a grassy kind of flavor and aroma, as well as some grapefruit notes and it therefore seems like it's vaguely related. It never gets the herbal qualities of SB however, and I find it MUCH more enjoyable. They also grow SB in the Rueda region, but I always wondered why because it tends to have that bell pepper quality that I dislike in that grape and it's always outclassed by the Verdejo of the particular producer when tasted side by side. 

BTW, there's also some grown in Australia and they do a pretty good job of it. Because it wasn't really vinified into serious wine until recently, Verdejo has the laudable quality of not having a "benchmark" wine that is supposed to express its typicity. I think that's a wonderful thing because then nobody will say about a Verdejo from Australia that it isn't like it is in Spain and consequently is a lesser wine. They tend to be rather inexpensive, rarely costing more than $20, so they tend to be good bargains. A little more flavor than something like Melon, but not as heavy or overwhelming as something like Riesling - they're great seafood wines, even though Rueda is inland.

Albarino is very different. And while it's grown in the Galicia region of Spain, where it's grown matters. That near the coast tends to be very different from that grown farther inland, where it can have some Riesling-like qualities. It was moderately trendy a few years ago but that seems to have passed, so it's better-known than a number of other white grapes from Spain, but it's not necessarily better. As a rule, it too tends to be fairly crisp and lean, sometimes very much so, sometimes with more apparent fruit. Neither that nor Verdejo tend to be oaked, which is one thing that keeps the cost down, although you can find some oaked versions if you look, I've had a few that I thought should be imported but there's a reluctance to those and they're more costly.

I don't know what it means not to be manipulated, but there isn't a lot of really bad Verdejo or Albarino that I've had, unlike something like Pinot Grigio, where most of it is just bad. That's not to say the former are always exciting - they're not, but at their worst they tend to be drinkable.

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Reply by JenniferT, May 13, 2013.

I really liked both Albarino and Verdejo...but I've had very limited exposure to either (a weakness that I'm pretty dedicated to correcting given how much I've liked what I've had so far). I will say that Albarino was more food friendly with a wider variety of cheeses, etc...the stuff I tried the wines with anyway. Which means precious little given the small sampling of wine that I've experimented with. 

I didn't know Albarino inland can become more like Riesling....thanks for that - really interesting and helpful! I'll have to try to get two Albarinos to compare and see for myself. 

 

 

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Reply by lvcomplex, May 13, 2013.

GregT and JenniferT: thanks so much, particularly Greg; I learned a lot. I agree, I have not had many Pinot Grigio's that were really good. I have found a Verdejo: Shaya and it is Spanish. do you know it?

My dinner is this weekend, on Sunday.

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Reply by lvcomplex, May 20, 2013.

Well, dinner was a huge success. We started with a yummy romesco and crostini appetizer served with the Ardeche Chardonnay. The Olive and avocado soup was served with Bochard Pere and Fils Reserve Bourgogne Chardonnay and that worked very well together. I just used a white vinegar BTW, as it was a very old recipe and I figured that's what they had used. Next time i may try a sherry vinegar.

 

The chicken with sun dried tomato and green olive olivada was served with Michele Chiarlo Barbera D'Asti Superiore Le Creme 2010 and that too was yummy together. We finished with a lemon rosemary olive oil cake...outstanding.

 

Thanks for all your help, you all gave me great ideas that guided me in my final choices.

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Reply by EMark, May 20, 2013.

LV, thank you for the report, and congratulations on your spectacular evening. 

It is very courteous of you to come back here and tell us how it all came out.  Much too often people come here for advice or opinions, then never return to fill us in.  (A former colleague used to refer to such behavior as "brain rape.")  We look forward to seeing you back here on the Snooth Forum.

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Reply by JenniferT, May 20, 2013.

Impressive! How lovely that things turned out so well! And nice of you to report back.

Your olive oil lemon rosemary cake sounds interesting as well.....I'd love it if you could post or send me the link if it's an online recipe.....otherwise I think I'll just search the interwebs to see what I can find myself. :)

 

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Reply by FedericoE, May 25, 2013.

Albariño is mostly grown at Rias Bajas therefore near the coast. There is another wine from the same grape but from Portugal grown further inland and is called Vinho Verde, and is also very good. 

Another Galician wine which is IMO is just as good if not better is the Godello grown in the hills bordering Leon. Any of this would go wondefully with seafood or fish, probably also with the cream of Kalamata soup.


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