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Snooth User: texgourmans

Hello Snooth!

Posted by texgourmans, Feb 25, 2013.

Help, I know some about wine, what I like.  I am hosting a surprise birthday dinner for a friend who has never had one, he will be 45 long story. The dinner will consist of cocktails and hor d'ouvres then followed by a six course meal. I have an idea for the white wine but I need help with the main course. I will be serving melissa d'arabian's four-step lemon-onion chicken and would like to serve a red wine with it.  Was thinking a beaujolais, but would like some ideas for another red that goes good with sauteed chicken.

 

Replies

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Reply by JonDerry, Feb 26, 2013.

Burgundy I'd say, though Beaujolais isn't far off.

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Reply by EMark, Feb 26, 2013.

I agree with you and JonDerry, Tex.  If you are looking for a red, Pinot Noir- or Gamay-based wine would be be the right direction.  So, for French examples, look for Burgundy or Beajolais  I don't know want to sound condescending, but I would disencourage you from Beaujolais Nouveau.  Look for Cru Beaujolais.

In terms of domestic wines it is hard, if not impossible, to find Gamay examples.  Pinot Noir is, of course, the current darling red grape in America.  You can find good examples from Oregon and California.  From California the Russian RIver Valley, Sonoma Coast, Santa Lucia Highlands or Sta. Rita Hills regions all have good reputations for Pinot Noir.

All that being said I have to ask if red wine is really what you want with your entre.  In all honesty, I do not know anything about Melissa d'Arabian's Four-Step Lemon-Onion Chicken, but it sounds like it has lemon.  Generally, that means there is a lemon flavor in the finished produce, and, to me, that begs for white wine--maybe a Loire Valley wine such as a Sancerre or Pouilly-Fume. 

OK.  I just thought of another red idea--Barbera.  I think this might work.  Medium-bodied and able to stand up to the acid from the lemon (because of its own acid content.)  Barbera d'Asti and Barbera d'Alba are fairly easy to find in U.S. wine stores.

Sorry, Tex.  Sometimes I get carried away with my pontificating and blur the question rather than clear it up.  Welcome to Snooth and please indulge me in one favor.  After your event, which does sound great, please come back and fill us in on what wines you did pick, and how the whole evening went.    

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 26, 2013.

unfortunately it is not until october. i was thinking perhaps a pinot gris or some other medium dry to dry white wine for the first three courses that are a starch, butternut squash soup, raspberry beaujolais sorbet in chocolate cups, sole baked in white wine then buttermilk sorbet before the main course. the main course will be the chicken on a bed of wilted spinach and roasted carrots, beets and baby red potatoes, followed by a salad. if i go with a green salad i will be using a red wine vinagarette (sorry spelling). so that is why i was looking for a hearty red to balance the meal.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Feb 26, 2013.

Up in Oregon, Myron Redford at Amity used to make true Gamay, but it looks like he discontinued it; the vineyard, 7 Springs, now seems to be selling to Evening Land. Edmunds-St. John sells a true Gamay, available form K&L. That said, I'm not really a big fan of Gamay, whether it's domestic or from Beaujolais.  Okay with turkey, but other than that it does not rock me.  The later versions produced using carbonic maceration which produces banana flavors put me off a fair bit. 

I think this dish sounds like it has too much lemon for Pinot Noir.  So I am going to agree with EMark that I would shy away from reds.  And I also agree with him that if you do want to go that route, Barbera is a somewhat better option.  I'd also consider a young Chianti, which can have high acids.  I'd shy away from anything with more complexity like Chianti Classicos and Riservas, and certainly from Brunellos--too much conflict between their earthy flavors and the citrus.  There are also domestic Barberas, but I'd go with the regions EMark recommends.

Please report back--and good luck.

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 26, 2013.

thanks may switch to some kind of stuffed steak or pork roast instead. since it is such large meal i was trying to keep everything lighter so to speak.

 

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Reply by EMark, Feb 26, 2013.

Tex, the good news is that there is plenty of time to think about it.  You can test the chicken dish with multiple wine accompaniments to see how it goes.  If I did not live two time zones away, I would offer to help taste. ;-)

On the other hand I am liking the idea of switching to pork.  That should go well with either Gamay- or Pinot Noir-based wines.

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 27, 2013.

Hello Tex,

Beaujolais is a fine idea, though you might also want to consider similarly light and fruity wines such as young Sangiovese, Barbera or Tempranillo that have a little more richness and darker fruit along with the acid needed to pair with the dish.

 

If you switch to pork you options really open up. What sort of recipe were you thinking of?

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 27, 2013.

roast pork loin with spicy plum sauce. made it several years ago and it was great

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 27, 2013.

Look for lowish tannins and big fruit with the spicy plum sauce. I would think a nice Petit Sirah or Petite heavy Zinfandel blend would work well with it.

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Reply by amour, Feb 27, 2013.

Pigs & Pinot all the way...reminds me of the Williams Selyem Winery and Merry Edwards Tastings...but quite seriously we do not need to be always boring and insist Pinot with Pork Loin!

By the way, in Vosges/France, Pork with dried prunes is a special dish.

A few useful points:  You may wish to Brine the loin overnight.

                                      You could add some Pinot Noir to the actual plum sauce

                                       Try serving some Japanese Plum Wine as well!

                                        Another idea is adding French Plum Brandy to the sauce

                                        If you end up choosing a very earthy wine, then add Chinese 5 spice powder to your sauce....you will be amazed how its various exotic spices like the star anise, clove, and fennel, highlight the wine and make for fantastic coupling!

May I caution you about the importance of getting your sauce in agreement with your wine...this is vital.

Too tart sauce...add a bit of pure honey, need for temperance, add a bit of double cream, far too sweet...add a few drops of lemon...

BTW...I have had a cheap Bogle Pinot Noir 2010 with roast pork loin and plum sauce...it was heaven indeed!

Would anyone suggest a Charlie Clay Pinot Noir as an ideal pairing wine with TEXGOURMANS style pork?

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 27, 2013.

had not thought of 5 spice.  what do you guys think of klien-oakley 5 reds? been awhile since i have had it but enjoyed it.

 

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Reply by amour, Feb 27, 2013.

Cline Oakley 5 REDS goes well with Spanish/ Latin American/Cuban cuisine.

I have tasted the 2006...merlot, barbera, cabernet franc, syrah and a tiny bit of mourvedre....good wine at that low price point!

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Reply by duncan 906, Feb 27, 2013.

Be nice if you could find a birth year wine

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Reply by EMark, Feb 27, 2013.

Duncan, what a great idea.  I make that to be 1968.  Tex, how good a friend are we talking about here?  Here is a purveyor that has 1968 Ridge Geyserville (Zinfandel, Petite Sirah, Carignan blend) for $250.

What do you think of the way we are taking over you party, Tex?  

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 28, 2013.

Emark, very good friend. As much as I would like to do a birth year wine, I am getting him a watch, something useful. Besides another friend and I would probably drink it before I could get it wrapped. If you guys are ever in west Texas, bring the wine, we'll have a party.

 

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 28, 2013.

thanks to all.  if i have more questions will post.  wish i could get my congressman to reply as quickly as you all did. lol

 

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Reply by amour, Feb 28, 2013.

Please keep in touch, TEX, your topic was quite stimulating!

Thanks for sharing!

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Reply by Tom Wandeloski, Feb 28, 2013.

I just recently tired and reviewed a 2011 Tempranillo from Rioja, Spain - Vina Bujanda Rioja Tinto

It is a a good everyday table red wine. and can be served served with a chicken or paella dish.

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Reply by texgourmans, Feb 28, 2013.

if it works out will have pix on facebook. love cooking and wine but i live with and take care of my 86 year old mother and her ranch, unfortunately she doesnt drink, so out of respect for her i dont here at the house.


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