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Snooth User: eslarson

Greetings from NYC.

Posted by eslarson, Sep 18, 2013.

Hello oenophiles!

I am a young wine novice looking to bank on the experience of the veteran wine lovers out there.

A little about myself, I'm a recent transplant to New York City from Southern California to attend Columbia University as a graduate acting student.  My new wife and I are braving the big city (not too bad coming from Orange County) and have been learning about and enjoying wine for the last two years and would like to learn more.

as far as our wine preference goes, our tastes outstrip our wallets, but here's what we tend to like:

I am into big reds.  I like zinfandel with plenty of peppery notes, Cabernet, Petite Syrah, and anything that goes well with a nicely seasoned piece of red meat.

MY wife, on the other hand, is much more into softer, fruitier reds, Pinot Noir, Merlot, and sweet whites.  Gewurstraminer, Moscato, 

We both agree more on the crisper whites:  Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, anything with a nice minerality and/or some acidity behind light apple or pear flavors is a winner in our book.

Coming from California, the vast majority of my experience is in Napa/Sonoma wines.  Now that I"m in New York, I'm looking to expand into the French wine selection that seems very prevalent here.

I look forward to learning from you all!

Replies

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 18, 2013.

Get yourself invited to drink GdP's wines!  Of course, his taste may not be yours, but...

I'll defer to our NYC contingent--GregT, EricGuido, MReff and of course GdP himself--but NY is a little more Euro-centric to be sure.  Astor Place Wines is huge, off the hook, prices are often very good, but not super convenient to Columbia, I have to say.  In general, buying wine is not as convenient there because the laws are absurd--you can only own one wine shop, pretty much--so groceries cannot sell wine, Trader Joe's cannot sell wine, and someone with a good location in Brooklyn can't bring the concept across the river to Manhattan.  (Really, those guys at Flatiron Wine do not have anything to do with those two shops in Brooklyn, I swear.) Chambers Street has an amazing selection of older wines and some of the most knowledgeable staff around. 

The great thing about going to NY and having to learn about European wine is that, when you get your first TV series back in California, you will discover that thanks to our wine culture and liberal wine sales laws, you can get all your old faves from Cali and all kinds of European wines at Wally's, Woodland Hills Wine Co., WineExpress, and K&L.  Then you'll remember those snowy winters, humid summers, and the bogus wine laws and you'll never want to leave California again. 

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Reply by EMark, Sep 18, 2013.

Welcome to the Snooth Forum, ES.  I really don't have much advice for you other than to second the comments, above, of Fox.  

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Reply by gregt, Sep 18, 2013.

MY wife, on the other hand, is much more into softer, fruitier reds, Pinot Noir, Merlot, and sweet whites.  Gewurstraminer, Moscato, 

We both agree more on the crisper whites:  Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Blanc, anything with a nice minerality and/or some acidity behind light apple or pear flavors is a winner in our book.

First thing to do is to get rid of those notions. Who ever said that Merlot is soft and fruity? Go taste the Merlot from Ladera for example, or any number from Washington or Bordeaux.
 
Who said that Moscato, or Muscat, or Moscatel or whatever you call it has to be sweet? It has a floral nose, but it's not sweet any more than Chardonnay is, unless someone intentionally makes it that way.  Same with Gwertz.
 
And then who said Chenin Blanc or Sauv Blanc have to be crisp?
 
Don't assume that a wine made from a particular grape has to come in a particular style. There's a lot of SB in Sauternes and Chenin Blanc is often completely lacking in "crispness" and it's also made into sweet wine frequently.
 
So first thing is to get rid of assumptions. I tasted a lot of good CA wine yesterday as well as some expensive flops, and it pretty much all comes down to the producer - how do they want to make their wine, where do they get their grapes from, etc.
 
Same in France.
 
Then the next thing is to get rid of the idea that wine has to be based on a single grape. The world's best wines IMO are very often blends.  Other than that, best of luck on your searches and welcome!
 
And good luck on the acting thing!
 

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