GDP on Wine

Snooth User: Gregory Dal Piaz

Drink anything good this weekend?

Posted by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 13, 2012.

Sadly I did Not.

 

I had a busy weekend that involved wine, but sadly that was mostly inventorying, packing, and moving wine around the state of NY! Got about a dozen cases moved closer to home, so now I'm pretty well set for the next few months of drinking!

 

Next bottle up looks like it might very well be 1987 Dunn Napa Valley. Funny how Dunn was on the backburner until recently. Nothing really changed witht he wines, but a new California Critic 'discovered' Dunn so he's popular again.

 

Anyway, that was a lie, first up are a dozen 1979 Barolos on Wednesday night!

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Replies

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Reply by JonDerry, Feb 13, 2012.

Can definitely relate to moving wine around...I have about 4-5 locations where i'm storing wine currently...had been prepping to get a wine locker but now i'm thinking of going with a Eurocave for my home, tough call.

Anyway, I did get around to trying a 2004 Beronia Gran Reserva. Definitely a nice Rioja, but it needs time. Was fully resolved on Day 2 with big oak, tannin, acid, but also very good cherry-raisin fruit.

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Feb 13, 2012.

I had a champagne weekend!

Pierre Moncuit - Cuvee Delos Gran Cru

De Sousa - Reserve Gran Cru

Bruno Michel - 1er cru Blanc de Blanc

Tarlant - La Vigne d'Antan

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Reply by outthere, Feb 13, 2012.

Standing up in the cellar for Saturday night is a 94 Forman Cab. Looking forward to that one.

During this past weekend we did some Pinots. 2008 Holdredge RRV, an 08 Whetstone Pleasant Hill and a 2009 Copain Les Voisins.

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 13, 2012.

Giacomo, how were the Michel and Tarlant? Can't remember having a De Sousa. Which did you like best?

Sunday was a bit of a debauch for me and a few friends. One American (me), one Canadian, one English, one Japanese, two French in the crew. It was a cookdown of a roast beef dinner, first one was French cooked a month ago, this one American cooked. All I did was prepare a Sunday dinner the way my grandmother would've, but I knew I was going to win (even over truflle-larded roast with fond de veau gravy last time), so I planned the wines in ways to sooth wounded Gallic pride... ;-)

Started with Schramsberg BdB vs. Veuve Cliquot NV comparison. Guess which won? Fortunately we hadn't gotten to the roast yet. At this point the French were happy to concede points.

Those bottles emptied in a flash, so we began an Anne Gros red splurge. A couple of her Languedoc's, then up to Burgundy.

Started with the Languedoc, though if we'd had aged versions of those I might've reconsidered the order. Had one bottle of her and JP Tollot's 2009 "50/50" (carignan, cinsault, grenache) and of their 2009 "Les Fontanilles" (single vineyard, similar fieldblend plus syrah). Both are easily some of the best Minervois red I've had, though I haven't exactly camped out there for months at a time tasting everything around. They call the 50/50 'table wine', but all that spice and mineral and chewiness is something that most tablewines only dream of getting in sight of. I liked the Fontanilles even better. Had the added pepper from the syrah, with velvety silkiness, smooth depth yet tannic structure that tells you it'll be sooo much better five years (or even10 in the Fontanilles case) down the line. Probably an even larger experience then. Hard to believe those two just started making wine there, five years or so ago, though of course they had plenty of experience in Burgundy.  Pricy for Minervois, yet very good QPR for what you get, IMHO. I'll be hunting down other of their offerings from that operation.

By this time we were well into the beef, and the husband of the French couple, who has worked in fine French restaurants in Tokyo for more than two decades, though as a Maitre D' and not in the kitchen, conceded defeat in the roast cookdown. English-style (via colonials in California) roast dinner beats French?? I was happy (especially for my grandmother's legacy), though he was showing signs of grumpiness. His wife kept out of it, which was easy because she doesn't eat meat. She does like red wine, though, so I was quietly pulling her on my side with that.

Thus, for diplomatic reasons, I didn't try to pull in any California or Oregon pinot noir nor Rhone Rangers. Enough roiled waters from the French contingent as it was. Time to pour the oil of bigger-gun  Burgundies.

I had available, all from Anne Gros, a Bourgogne rouge, a Vosne Romanée Les Barreaux, an Echezeaux Les Loachausses Grand Cru, a Clos Vougeot Le Grand Maupertui Grand Cru and a Richebourg Grand Cru, all from 2005 except the Echezeaux which was 2007. At the beginning of the evening I made a strategic decision to set aside the Echezeaux and Richebourg for a future comparison with some Meo Camuzets (also since, with six of us, even though several of us like to keep going when we're in our good-wine, good-company groove, I figured seven bottles ought to do it, even if nobody was driving home, unless it was in the back of a taxi). So we had the Bourgogne rouge, Vosne Romanée and Clos Vougeout, in that order. All were excellently made, far, far beyond merely tasty, and the evening helped clarify a certain elegance that seems to be Anne Gros' style. 

The plain 'red' was great fruit (both red and black), juicy and earthy with well defined cut. I consider this bottle also to provide good QPR. It was well ready to be consumed, with lots of gusto. The Vosne Romanee had power and depth of color but I got more red than black fruit from it. It wasn't quite at its peak, and the acidity made me think it'll age well. The Clos Vougeout was very full, I was thinkiing 'austere', not quite monolithic because of the vintage, as the tannins had a ripeness. All sorts of black fruit and spice (I was particularly picking up pepper as well as baking spices), and this could become something really quite special with more bottle age. It's a wine I like plenty. Glad I'd opened it what turned out to be four hours before we drank it. Definitely want to save some more bottles of this for several years down the line.

By the end of our time at table it was fun to watch everyone. There I was trying different carrots and potatoes and bermuda onions that had roasted in pan with the meat and sprigs of thyme and sage and rosemary, a different herb with each bite, trying to pull different aspects of the wine. The Canadian was playing with her peas and mashed potatoes and gravy, making the right mix, also enjoying the hell out of the pinot, even though she puts up a tough front about not wanting to ever be 'a wine snob'. The French couple were nodding with broad smiles. The English banker just kept drinking till sleepy. The Japanese was all awonder at the meal that had been made at home and the wines, all that she liked better than out at restaurants. Everyone sipping the wines and laughing, sipping and getting garrulous, sipping and looking very, very happy....

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 13, 2012.

Outthere, guess I was writing while you were posting. Salivating at the thought of the '94 Forman. Let us know how the bottle does...

And Greg, how 'backburner' was Dunn, anyway? I always read his interviews, never turned down his wines--something I can't say for all that many more Napa winemakers (well less than a dozen, anyway)--once I'd run across those early Caymus and Pahlmeyer bottles he shaped....

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Reply by spikedc, Feb 14, 2012.

Had a bottle of Penfolds 'Koonunga Hill Seventy Six' 2008, Shiraz Cabernet. I was planning to keep it for a couple of more years but gave in to temptation. I love anything by Penfolds and this didn't dissapoint.

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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Feb 14, 2012.

Great dinner dmcker with a lot of corpses (empty bottles i mean) on your table.

Schramsberg BdB vs. Veuve Cliquot NV (base cuvee i suppose) was not a really fair fight.... :)

 

About my champagne evening the bottle i loved more was the first one the Cuvee Delos of Pierre Moncuit, maybe wasn't greatest one but so enjoyable. All of that champagnes was really good (all Blanc de Blanc), Moncuit was elegant, mineral and really fresh a little lighter than De Sousa (Moncuit was a not declared vintage, De Sousa a classic cuvee). Michel was a lot different, more "rounded" with classic pastry aromas, really tasty. Tarlant was unusual, a full body champagne (80+ yo vineyard).

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Reply by JonDerry, Feb 14, 2012.

Sounds like quite a hi time D, looking forward to conducting many evenings like that in the future...it's also good to have some names to bat around in burgundy and the languedoc.

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 14, 2012.

Good thing, Giacomo, is that the Schramsberg BdB is considerably cheaper than the VC NV here in Tokyo. Yeah there were plenty of dead soldiers spread around, since every bottle was drained to the last drop. Not even that much wine left for the cheese course afterwards, and no one had any room for dessert, though one of the crew insisted on drinking some Jack Black to everyone else's moans..... The Tarlant sounds like it was good and weighty, the Michel very drinkable, and the Moncuit refreshing. Since De Sousa is more of a blackbox to me can you say anything else about it?

Jon, I imagine Anne Gros and her Partner are probably viewed as interlopers by some of the crustier vignerons of the Languedoc. And you asked for something 'anecdotal' in that Chianti thread.... ;-)

 

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Reply by JonDerry, Feb 14, 2012.

Absolutely, also liked the bit about that gal drinking much better than "restaurant wines", it's nice when they set the bar so low.

The Languedoc is an interesting region, I read it was responsible for 1 of every 10 grapes grown in the 20th century, or something to that effect. Selling it all, however, has been a challenge at times. Modern techniques and new plantings seem to be making a difference, i'm hearing more and more about these wines lately.

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 14, 2012.

How back burner was Dunn?

Well, according to many his wines never came around and over the past 2 decades there is a litany of producers who have been touted as the second coming garnering super points and unsustainable prices for the wines whiel Randy dun judt did what he had done!

His wines were out of fashion, some even had the temerity to say out of step with the times, and the prices continue to show that.

The 87 Dunn I have lined up can still be had for $80, which is a steal. The 91-93 for not much more and the 07 for $65.

Sure that's a lot of money, except in the world of big name Napa Cabs, in which case it's not so much. The Howell Mtn is of course more, but not always better per se.

This is Grand Cru Napa Cab in my book but it sure isn't priced like it.

 

That's all I got.

 

 

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 14, 2012.

Let's just say I stopped buying Pahlmeyer a couple of years after he stopped making their wines, and RP's Queen-Goddess began.

And sshhhhh.... I like that pricing!!

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Reply by JonDerry, Feb 14, 2012.

Dunn, the Leoville Barton of Napa Cabs?

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Reply by duncan 906, Feb 14, 2012.

On Saturday I wernt to collect a bottle of wine,a 1928 Maury, I had bought on www.bidforwine.co.uk/auctions/show/23794 The seller turned out to be a charming Swiss gentleman who owned a wine shop, www.amphora-wines.co.uk  ,and we had a lovely chat while I browsed his collection of rare,fine and expensive wines I did comment thatr a farmyard in Rutland was an unusual location for a shop such as his but he said he did a lkot of business through the internet.I was tempted and I ended up buying a bottle of Domaine de la Rectorie Collioure Coume Pascale.I remembered that I had once visited the beautiful towns of Collioure and Banyuls between Perpignan and the Spanish border a few years ago.On my return home I had a meal of Beof Bourbignon with a bottle of Terres de Galets, a  Cotes de Rhone from the negociant Gabriel Meffre

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Reply by duncan 906, Feb 14, 2012.
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Reply by Giacomo Pevere, Feb 14, 2012.

@dmcker, that's what i have writed about De Sousa: nice straw yellow, fine and long foam. The nose of the typical chardonnay notes of pineapple and peach are flanked by notes of toasted hazelnuts, honey and acacia flowers. A minerally chalk and marine notes makes the background. Impressive minerality, fresh and very delicate mousse on palate, return the yellow fruits and flowers and then close the typical and very delicate notes of lime.

Moncuit and De Sousa had much in common (fruit and flower aromas, impressive minerality) but De Sousa was more soft, sweeter fruits and flowers, softer sip. More balanced and of course classic cuvee with different vintages base wines really help to reach that.

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 14, 2012.

Thanks, Giacomo. A very clear picture, indeed. I will try to grab a bottle if I ever run across one.

Jon, I'd rather have a Dunn than a Leoville, most any day of the week.   ;-)

And Duncan, sounds like a good meal. I, too, love the scenery and ambience (and food and drink) of Collioure....

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 15, 2012.

OK, we can stop talking adout this. I'm done!

A Leoville vs. the guy I'm not talking about tasting would be very interesting and the comparison is pretty apt I would say.

Nice set of wines Duncan. That 28 Maury is delicious. Bought some for my Dad once, birthyear wine, but it wasn't his speed so I've shared the bottles with friends.

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Reply by duncan 906, Feb 15, 2012.

Greg,

I am glad that there is somebody  on here who has tasted  Maury.I have yet to try one which is partly why I bought it but I have had a couple of bottles of Banyuls,a similar wine from the same area.The first time I had Banyuls was at a restaurant with dinner in the town of Banyuls overlooking the sea.I intend saving my bottle of Maury for a special occasion,probably one of my sister's dinner parties,and serve it either as an aperitif or with the cheese.When i do drink it I will of course leave a review here on Snooth.I last tasted Collioure wine when I was in that area a few years ago so I hope the bottle I have now bought will be a good one

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Reply by Baffetto de Roma, Feb 15, 2012.

Allegrini

Amarone della Valpolicella Classico

One of the most noble wines of Verona...

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