Wine Talk

Snooth User: penguinoid

Chianti

Posted by penguinoid, Aug 5, 2009.

Chianti is something I've been meaning to try for some time. I took a Chianti to a friend's house a few days ago when I went for dinner, but was a little disappointed. I know there are some not-so-good ones out there, but not certain if I hit one of these or just a disappointing bottle.

The wine I tried was the Sensi Chianti Riserva 2003. Smell was beautiful -- cherry, dark berries, spice and maybe earth/truffles. The taste was a bit thin -- some dark berries and cherry, and that was about it.

Any suggestions for other Chiantis that I should look out for?

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Replies

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Reply by oceank8, Aug 5, 2009.

I find Chiantis to be a bit on the lighter side. Not always what you want. Good with most pizza though!

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Reply by CelfDestruk, Aug 5, 2009.

Well, the Chianti's I've liked are from Castello di Verrazzano. The Chianti Classico Reserved 2001 is very good. And if you're ever in Florence (Firenze) Italy, they have a restaurant undo the same name. Very good wines.

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Reply by deconut, Aug 5, 2009.

Try: Under $20 - DaVinci, Ruffino Classico Reserve, Carpineto - Ruffino has the Gold label also if you want to spend more - there are so many others but these are the basic old reliables.

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Reply by penguinoid, Aug 5, 2009.

Okay, thanks. I'll try looking around for the Chiantis mentioned.

For some reason, I'd been assuming that Chianti was a rather full-bodied wine. I guess this shows not to trust assumptions ;-). I might also try it with a lighter meal than a roast next time.

I'll make a mental note of Castello di Verrazzano for if I ever do get to Italy. I'm hoping I will -- but it won't be for a couple of years, I guess.

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Reply by deconut, Aug 5, 2009.

The above I mentioned are full bodied but if you are looking for something a little richer you may looking for some Super Tuscans - not sure what your pocketbook will allow but Castellare I Sodi Di S. Niccolo 2001 is a wonderful Super Tuscan as well as Ruffino Modus 2005 - I think you will like the Chianti's I mentioned above though - they never disappoint and are far from light wines! Enjoy!!

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Reply by penguinoid, Aug 5, 2009.

I'll try one of the ones you suggested, if I find them -- I'm in Australia at the moment, and it's very much luck of the draw what you can find with imported wines. I notice one review of the Ruffino Chianti Classico Riserva Ducale Oro 2001
http://www.snooth.com/wine/ruffino-...
notes that "has recently become a more internationally styled wine" -- I hope this does not mean they are making wines in more of a new-world style. I'm not that much of a fan of fruit-dominated new world wines.

The Super Tuscans are also wines I've been wanting to try, but from the sounds of it the Castellare I Sodi Di S. Niccolo is one that will have to wait until my wallet has something other than moths in it ;-)

gavin,

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Reply by deconut, Aug 6, 2009.

First of all - I do not think the "right" chianti is a light wine so you are drinking the wrong wine for certain!! Light wines in the red family are the Pinot Noirs. Chianti should not taste that way - if they do, you have the wrong wine!
Hey dont worry about the wallet - my friends swear by the Basic Ruffino chianti which is $9.99 for the large bottle - I have tried it and I think it is ok for the price - it might be what you are looking for - lots of nose and flavour - can be harsh but a good everyday wine which I think you may be looking for - you cannot beat a fairly good wine for $9.99 for the large bottle - not my taste but I drink it and am not snobby about it -very inexpensive as far as chiantis go and more full flavour which I think you may like - not as light as you are describing ....so that may be just what you are looking for. The DaVinci Chianti is $9-13 a bottle and well worth it - of course there are the reserves, etc. but the basic Chianti is excellent for the price - Make note of the others listed here - they are more than worth it when you can afford them - no rush....they are not going anywhere!! Enjoy!

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Reply by penguinoid, Aug 6, 2009.

From the looks of it, I just got a disappointing bottle. It's quite possible that this isn't even representative of the Sensi Chianti Riserva. I'll have a look and see what Chiantis are available next time I go to my local wine store -- and there's a tasting of some South Australian and some Chilean wines tomorrow evening, so that sounds like another good excuse :-)

Thanks for the advice!

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Reply by sajanibrahim, Aug 11, 2009.

Hi,

I feel you should try Montegiachi Chianti Classico Riserva, don't think u will be dissappointed ever again after nosing them.
Chin Chin!

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Reply by penguinoid, Aug 11, 2009.

Thanks for the suggestion. I'll have a look round for it, but lookingg for specific wines seems to be harder than you'd expect. My local wine store had only two chiantis, and that's a fairly good store. I ended up getting a bottle of Poggiotondo 2006 Chianti Superiore, which I'll try this week. I'll look in a few other stores too.

http://www.snooth.com/wine/poggioto...

Could be worse -- I've also been looking around for muscadets (I like minerally white wines). So far I've found approximately zero bottles. One store apparently had never heard of them.

I shouldn't complain too much, though -- there are some nice things in amongst the selection of what they *do* have.

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Reply by KiltedDrinker, Aug 11, 2009.

If you're willing to look beyond the (reasonably) protected Chianti region, try some Rosso di Montalcino - the one in my house at the moment is Poggio San Polo. Had it at the weekend and it's a perfectly lovely drop with a rich pasta sauce. If you wanna spend a bit (or a lot) more on a Tuscan wine, get hold of a Brunello di Montalcino. Be warned though, it's an expensive habit as the more you spend, the better it gets.

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Reply by Imperial210, Aug 11, 2009.

La Marronaia Capriforno Chianti is excellent for $10/bottle! Stock up.

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Reply by penguinoid, Aug 12, 2009.

I'm in no way biased against wines which aren't chianti ;-). It's just a style of wine I've been wanting to try for a while. I'll look out for the Rosso di Montalcino, but don't hold my breath as to my ability to find it. As for Brunello di Montalcino -- yes, this is a wine I'd really like to try. But, as with Barolo, whilst there are more affordable ones out there I never seem to be able to find them in the shops. I think they'll both have to wait till I'm back in the UK, and have a wider range of European wines to choose from.

I'll look out for La Marronaia Capriforno Chianti too!

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Reply by natashacooking, Jun 3, 2013.

@Imperial210: their 2010 vintage is also terrific.  Continues to be a great value 

- - 

Cooking Inspired By Life

http://cookinginspiredbylife.wordpress.com/

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Reply by JenniferT, Jun 6, 2013.

I've found  that Chianti has consistently proven to be one of the most versatile wines for pairing with foods. But there seem to be a lot of different types of Sangiovese wines, and I'm really just starting to explore the differences.

So far, the best value I've found for a Chianti has been Fonterutoli Chianti Classico. It is available here in canada for under twenty bucks, so I imagine it will be even more inexpensive for you.

I'd probably have better advice for you if I'd drank more wine by now, but hey - I'm working on it. :)

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Reply by JenniferT, Jun 6, 2013.

A timely reply. Just noticed this one started back in 2009. 

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Reply by penguinoid, Jun 7, 2013.

Only been four years -- not too long? I'll look out for the Fonterutoli though -- thanks.

Tax on wine is fairly high in Australia, so it's often much more expensive than it is in the US (or France). I don't know how prices compare with Canada, though.

I missed out on a Brunello & Barolo tasting earlier in the week, which was annoying. Both these wines are *hideously* expensive by the time they get to Australia.

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Reply by JenniferT, Jun 8, 2013.

Pardon me, I'm just learning to use the internets.

I'd venture to bet we share a common plight. Canada and taxes on alcohol go hand in hand. It has been painful to fork out the dough for those wines here. But I get to periodically go down across the border and bring back cases of wine from the US. In my defense, the wines I bring back aren't available here for any price. Cross border shopping is probably a canadian rite of passage anyway. :)

As I discover and drink more wine, I'll try to create a list of best values. But it's too early for that right now.

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Reply by penguinoid, Jun 8, 2013.

No -- don't worry, it was just a joke on my part. Four years is a long time on the internet, but not in real life.

I've brought wine back with me from France and the UK -- again, generally wines I can't buy in Australia -- but it's a bit harder than getting them back from the US to Canada. I'm limited to what I can fit in checked baggage, for one thing. I always bring back more than I'm meant to (I think there's a limit of about five or six bottles, I often manage to fit in 12+ bottles) and one day they'll charge me duty ... I always tell them I'm a winemaking student (true!) and this is normally enough to explain why I bought so much wine.

I signed up for the Chambers Street email newsletter recently, and it's depressing to compare the prices there with Australia. Also, the selection. A 1990 Saint-Estèphe for $119? Okay, well over my budget, but you'd be lucky to find a 2009 for that price in Australia. And so on. Burgundy (my favourite) is often twice the price I'd pay in Burgundy, sometimes more. Some of this is from transporting it half way around the world(!) but a lot is tax.

The excuse is to curb alcoholism, but oddly the cheap rubbish favoured by alcoholics generally manages to avoid most of the taxes, whilst fine wines don't.

There are lots of good value wines out there. Try some good Beaujolais -- especially Beaujolais-Villages, some  of those can be good and they're apparently almost impossible to sell so the vigneron will be pathetically grateful ;-).

How are the prices on domestic wines in Canada? I gather you make some pretty good wines there, though I haven't had the chance to try any yet -- only ever seen Inniskillin Ice Wine here.

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Reply by JenniferT, Jun 8, 2013.

For us the main problem is tax as well. I'll start paying closer attention, but I would guess that we tend to pay anywhere from 15% to 40% more than our southern neighbours pay for the same bottles. The worst thing, by far, is the limited selection in our stores.  

Because of this, I routinely take back well over my limit. Even when I pay the extra cost for duty at customs, I still haven't paid any more than I would pay in Canada. If I could buy the wines here at all, that is.

I've only flown with a substantial quantity of wine once. It was both really difficult and incredibly expensive. I drove a long distance (7 -8 hours, maybe) to a wine store in the nearest city, where they had already put together more bottles than I'd expected to pick up. Then I immediately did most of that same same drive back before flying out of an airport in Northern Canada with 5, yes 5, cases of wine. I was travelling alone and had to park a long distance away from the terminal....in an unpaved, uneven rocky area covered with deep snow. Meaning good luck if you'd like to roll anything anywhere. I'll never forget it. The cost was also pretty huge - over $500 - averaging over $100 for each case - equivalent to the total what I might pay for a short trip to the US (boat, gas, hotel, restaurants, etc). That was this past February.

So yeah - while that's a pretty extreme example, I feel your pain in terms of flying with wine. Driving, on the other hand, is a snap. And I generally like driving more than flying anyway.

The wine industry in canada is starting to blossom, especially in BC. However BC wines certainly don't tend to be any less expensive than wines from anywhere else. I'm a little guilty of not drinking much wine made here. I think most BC wines tend to be a little more expensive than wines from the US, but it is tough to make such a broad comparison. Maybe one of these days I'll travel around to some of the wineries here and post about it. However we usually just go down over the border on vacation time. 

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