Wine & Food

Snooth User: Richard Foxall

Brisket, and not BBQ.Pairing ideas?

Posted by Richard Foxall, Sep 14, 2012.

Okay, we usually don't make brisket for Rosh Hashanah, but this year the wife saw a recipe that she liked with plums and port.  So what to go with it?  Earlier, we had planned a pre-Inquisition Spanish-Jewish meal, and I was all hyped up for Spanish wine, but now I'm kind of dubious about tempranillo with this. So, Rhones?  Something higher in acid, like a Lagrein?  Maybe dolcetto for the slight contrast of bitter finish?   Go weird with a spicyuber-/acidic/slightly swet Riesling? 

Replies

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Reply by JonDerry, Sep 14, 2012.

I would say definitely go Rhone, Riesling, or both to see which goes better.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 14, 2012.

What does anyone think of Carmenere for this dish?  Just kind of hit me as a possibility.  Although I like the idea of the spicy Rhone and the sharp riesling...

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Reply by gregt, Sep 14, 2012.

Now that I finally got the BBQ down with brisket you're going off in a different direction?

But dude - plums and Port.

And you want a dry wine?

Why?

Seriously, with a sweet fruity dish, a dry wine is going to taste crappy. If you do a Riesling, I'd do something with some sweetness and matter of fact, that could be really good.

Or forget about the Rhone and go with Banyuls.

Or Port!

 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 14, 2012.

We're really looking at Riesling, and I have a Priorat that is a touch sweet that I might open.  And if I knew where to get more of Clay Mauritson's "port" I'd be all over that.

Banyuls, that's interesting. 

Turns out my mother in law is having the same thing back on Long Island.  Should have sent the Mani home with her--now that's a sweet wine!

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Reply by gregt, Sep 14, 2012.

"Should have sent the Mani home with her"

That would have done her in for sure! I'm lucky. I love my M-I-L.

Who, BTW, would probably love the brisket and Port and plums. Now how to get it to her for the holidays . . .

 

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Reply by JonDerry, Sep 15, 2012.

Ok, then it's resolved...sweet with sweet. Dry with savory.

Sounds like a plan.

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Reply by duncan 906, Sep 15, 2012.

Brisket is a cut of beef which can be very nice but it needs to be cooked long and slow or otherwise it will be as tough as old boots.I think that the best wine to accompany beef or steak is a red burgundy but I am sure others may have other ideas

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 15, 2012.

Okay, Duncan, that's usually true, but this is the fatty part of a brisket, and now that I have seen it with my own eyes, this won't be stringy.  My mother in law is making the same recipe and is worried that it can't be sliced, while we are planning to serve ours with a spoon! 

GregT, I mean no harm towards my MIL.  But I want that wine out of my house!  My wife seriously regressed when her mother was here and bought it so we could have it at Passover.  This after we searched GDP's recos for kosher wines and actually found a decent one from Israel and a so-so one from Spain. 

Here's what I am planning:  I have two bottles of sparkling because, after all, it's the New Year for my wife's people and what's a new year without bubbles?  Then we have a Priorat that seems to be a bit sweet.  We have a Madera that was recommended as a zingier alternative to a Port.  And we have a Riesling Auslese for good measure. I'll have a few other things just in case, but the core is sweet wines with serious acidity. I'll let you know how it goes.

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Reply by napagirl68, Sep 15, 2012.

Great suggestions, but...

I saying Pinot Noir all the way on this one... especially a fuller, more purple fruit pinot.  The plum screams for this, IMO, and that porty/plum redux will need a fruity wine low on tannins.  I am thinking a SCM Pinot.

Recipe sounds delish!!!

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 17, 2012.

Okay, here's what we did:  I got a really nice Auslese and we served that, it went pretty well.  But it wasn't completely gone. Someone brought an Etude Cabernet, and I couldn't stick it in the cellar without being rude, so we drank that.  Tasty, but a little heavy for the whole meal.  We also had a Bual Madeira that was really good and it kind of paired okay with the meal, too, but was a bigger hit after dinner.  None of the participants were big wine drinkers to begin with, sooo...

The brisket was not as sweet as expected, the chicken dish with figs and olives was only a touch sweet.  A spicier Pinot or a S. Rhone could have worked, but, all in all, not a failure.  I learned something new about Madeira, so that was worthwhile, and I didn't waste a really expensive bottle on a dinner where wine was completely secondary. 

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Reply by JonDerry, Sep 18, 2012.

Nice, honest, report there. I often find pairings being over rated, other than the simple ones like Burgundy and Brie, Whites and Seafood, etc. 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 18, 2012.

Thanks.  I have to say that I am more open to sweet wines than I once was, but I don't find Ausleses are as zippy with acid as I want them to be to cut through the sweet.  Sure, it wasn't cloying, but I like my dry whites pretty sharp, so I hope for even more acid in the sweets.  I'm thinking of experimenting with some off-dry chenins, but it might be a lost cause.  The Bual was interesting--definitely had strong acid, but drinking madeirized wine with dinner seemed a little odd.  Still, I can see breaking it out for post-dinner cheese courses and the like.

Wow, did I just say cheese course and Madeira? Before long, I'll be drinking sherry and listening to opera.  Or nursing a beer and listening to jazz.

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Reply by EMark, Sep 18, 2012.

OK, I am now listening to Brubeck/Desmond/Morello/Wright.  Very vintage stuff.  There is not a drop of beer in this house, and, in all honesty, I don't think that would do it for me.  My stomach is too empty for brandy--somehow that seems to be what would go well, now.  I think I am going to try that Heitz Chardonnay that JD recommended

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 18, 2012.

EMark: Brubeck was born in the next town over from where I grew up and continued to have an influence on the music programs at my sister's high school. I have Time Out on vinyl and CD--had it since I was in college on the vinyl.  My daughter and I were talking about weird time signatures the other day when she mistakenly called something an 18th note.  My first instrument was trumpet and I played jazz until a cruel teacher broke me of the habit in junior high--back then, schools had multiple bands at the elementary level, and we had a renowned instrumental program.  My sister also played jazz on the clarinet, but never loved it the way I do.  If there was a cellartracker for records, my vinyl wouldn't be extensive, necessarily, but carefully picked.  Lots of old pressings of Miles, Trane, Monk, mostly, and the Paul Gonsalves sessions with Duke's group, and other scattered things.  But I never nurse a beer with those.  More likely to be sipping bourbon late at night or drinking wine while I make dinner.  Our most frequent guests for dinner are wine and jazz hounds and he brings me a new CD almost everytime I see him, which has increased my jazz holdings by many dozens of recordings these last ten years.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Sep 18, 2012.

Paul G. going nuts--pour yourself something that's up to the challenge.  Now there's a topic:  Music and wine pairings.

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Reply by EMark, Sep 18, 2012.

That's one heck of a solo.


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