Wine Talk

Snooth User: Yukari

Bodegas Ada Navarra Red Guitar Tempranillo-garnacha NV

Posted by Yukari, Oct 12, 2008.
Details for Bodegas Ada Navarra Red Guitar Tempranillo-Garnacha NV

I love to mix with Garnacha and some grapes~~~ These one are generally blended with other grapes......I'm wondering that how come generally. Anyway I just love to drink about mixed up garnacha and something.
If the person who knows about this reason. KIndly advice me.

Replies

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Oct 13, 2008.

Garnacha, also known as Grenache has traditionally been used as a blending grape for two reasons.

The first reason in that several varieties of grapes were planted in a vineyard to ensure production every year. Grenache is a late ripening variety so that in years that were cool or with late season rains it produced thin, frequently unpleasant wines that were blended with earlier ripening varieties to make a satisfactory wine.

Nowadays things are a little different. Growing seasons are rarely as erattic as they were even 20 years ago, though late season rains still pose a threat. The main reason for blending today is balance. For example Grenache is a relatively low acid wine with light color, high alcohol and big sweet, fruit but neither much complexity not depth. Tempranillo is a higher acid wine with a fair amount of acid and structure and layered, earthy flavors. By blending the two wines the sum is greater than it's parts. The resultant wine is better balanced and more complex than if either grape had been vinified alone.

I hope that makes sense!! Keep exploring wines with us.

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Reply by Yukari, Oct 18, 2008.

Hi~! Gregory Dal piaz! Thank you for your pretty nicer advice.
I've ever believed depended on good quality weren't blended at all.
For instance, Sylah 100% which is usually very expensive to drink in Japan.
However as you say so It helps good parts in each other.
and Bouldex is also absolutely blended grapes as well, right?

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Oct 20, 2008.

Hi Yukari,

Yes, virtually all Bordeaux is blended, Many wines lend themselves to blending and one should never think a blended wine is any better or worse than an unblended wine. Each region, grape, and producer makes their own choices and each wine needs to be judged on their own merits. Everyone has a unique palate and a unique take on each wines. That's one of the greatest features of this wonderful world of wine!


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