Wine Talk

Snooth User: wessel792

Beginner looking for good fruity wines

Posted by wessel792, Feb 8, 2011.

I tried Luccio Rosa and found out that they do not  make it anymore. It was my first bottle of wine and loved it. My sister told me some more to try if I liked that and she gave me Stella Rose wich was good. And Macodo. They are both very good but would like to expand. Please help if you have any idea's. I have tried the Yellowtail and really, really did not like any of them.

Replies

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Feb 8, 2011.

Well not liking yellowtail is a promisng sign.

So by fruity do you mean that you like wines that are a bit sweet?

You should find a bottle of the Jam jar Shiraz

If this is not what you like we can begin to narrow things down a bit.

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Reply by stunney, Feb 8, 2011.

Brassfield Eruption is a wonderful red, mix of shiraz, merlot, cabernet, and other wines.

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Reply by Caligibson, Feb 8, 2011.

I have two words for you... ORIN and SWIFT: Orin Swift winery is a more than up and coming winery and their winemaker, Dave Phinney, is known for making exceptionally fruit forward wines.  Two of his newest wines, Abstract and Machete (both Rhone style domestic blends) are LADEN with big, gooey, chewy fruit.  I also agree with Gregory Dal Piaz, Jam Jar (a John Anthony Truchard project with his wife Michelle; John and Michelle abbreviated JAM, get it?) is really good, linear fruity wine.   Otherwise RED4 by Vina Robles is fantastic for under $20 a bottle too.  Abstract is about $25 and Machete is closer to $40. 

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 9, 2011.

Cali, I have to completely disagree with you.  The Orin Swift line is made up almost entirely of huge, over-the-top, high ABV wines.  I would never reco those to a beginner, especially one that enoys Stella Rosa, which is only 5.5% ABV itself and Moscato (I think that's what the OP meant to type), another low ABV wine.

OP, I'd look for entry-level Rieslings.  Some that are inexpensive and easy to find include Chateau Ste. Michelle and Dr. Loosen's "Dr. L" line.  They're also low in alcohol, slightly sweet and fruity, and very easy to drink.

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Reply by Caligibson, Feb 9, 2011.

@Girl Drink Drunk- We are from completely different coasts, and seemingly polarized frames of reference and realms of wine.  Rieslings, especially Loosen's sweeter, lower ABV is a great food wine and a simple white, a great place to start. 

I see west coast trends of entry level pallete's attrition from low ABV, sweeter wines almost immediately to high ABV, high RS over-ripe red wines, like my aforementioned wines or especially even some old vine Zinfandel.  People gravitate to these nearly Port-like high extraction, high ABV wines because they're fruity and easy to wrap the head around.  I think it's great that we have different opinions,  the true beauty of the internet, and it's even more interesting to see how your coastal trends seem to be the exact opposite of mine. So OP, we would all love some feedback when you!!! Help us to help you identify your pallette!

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 9, 2011.
Edited Feb 9, 2011

Hmmm, I disagree that East Coast v West Coast has much to do with palate.  Yes, I personally drink mostly Old World style wines, but know many local people who prefer New World.  I think it's matter of taste over matter of coast.  Although, there may be something to your theory, as it seems that many people I know "outgrow" CA wines and their ilk and move onto OW choices.

I agree that differing suggestions are key, as no two palates are the same.  I was simply using an educated guess based on the wines the OP mentioned enjoying.

Palate: Loosely, relating to sense of taste.

Pallette: Not a real wine word (not trying to be snarky, see this confusion often).

Cheers.

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Reply by outthere, Feb 9, 2011.
Edited Feb 9, 2011

I'm agreeing with GDD on this one. I opened an Abstract the other night and ended up pouring it out. And I like big wines. It was a mess. All goopy and hot. Just not real pleasing. The Machete is Petite Sirah based, not really Rhone, and I hear it's much tastier from an acquaintance who drank a bottle last night.

Low alc fruity? The Castello del Poggio Moscato from the Zonin tasting the other night fits that bill. That is if she/he likes fizz. Kinda soda poppy for me but...

Pallette: Noun, one of the rounded armor plates at the armpits of a suit of armor. - Not a wine word but a word nonetheless.

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 9, 2011.

I meant to type "wine word".  Time to edit.  ;)

Fixed.

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Reply by outthere, Feb 9, 2011.

Holy moly! An edit function!!!!! Woo freakin hoo!!!!

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Reply by dmcker, Feb 9, 2011.

Then there's palette, which seems to be the most common mistake and only commonly useful if you're an oldschool oils-type artist, or a digital one using Pantone, etc. And pallet, good for moving things around if you drive skiploaders or buy loads of wine and ship them across oceans...

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Reply by Caligibson, Feb 9, 2011.

Thanks for the constructive commentary outthere, I  really appreciate it.  Abstract isn't my favorite either, but it's a raging hit out here for the jammy, chewy fruit-laden wine types of people.  Machete is stylistically similar to Abstract, so it may not be up your alley with it's heavy ink and gripping fruit stance, though it's significantly more structured.  And you're right too, Petite Sirah is not from Rhone but from Languedoc-Roussillon, developed by Dr. Durif at University of Montpellier and rarely seen anywhere in France anymore. I was just making regional stylistic generalities. 

In regards to my typo, I think we all knew what I meant, and  "Palette" is also an AOC in southern France, named after a small villages part of Le Tholonet, which gives the AOC it's name, while we're discussing definitions of words out there...

I am just playing around with you all, just having fun with our debate.  I also have to admit I confused Greg's Jam Jar suggestion with the JA "JAM," but I still want to hear back from the OP for more of what they're looking for, some people love big fruit and don't mind bigger alcohol... we'll see, and we can keep going from there.  I think every suggestion has been relative and actually don't disagree with any of them, and the Zonin is a good call too; a fun little wine and I saw it at the local Trader Joe's for under ten bucks, a price point where you can't go wrong.

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Reply by Caligibson, Feb 9, 2011.

HA! I love how this became a discussion on "Pallette" et. al. variations!  Great community of people, hilarious, I love it.

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Reply by gregt, Feb 9, 2011.

I'm with GDD too.  And it's only coincidence I'm on the east coast too.

Funny because I just posted on a similar thread on another site.

But if the OP like the Moscato, assuming that was what he or she meant, I think the hi-alc wines don't work.  Wine people may love them, but the average person doesn't always warm to them.  The fortified wines like Ports, sherries, etc., come off like cough syrup.  The "dry" wines that are high alc, like zins, etc., come off as just way too big and they still have tannins.  Botrytized wines sometimes work, but generally have aromas that are unusual for many people. And Riesling can often have a gasoline or sulfur smell that turns people off.

So what I've found is that something like a Muscat with some RS seems to work.  Maybe a Brachetto if you can find one. But the peachy, floral nose is very nice on its own, and if there's a bit of sugar, the wine tends to be pretty agreeable and doesn't feel hot or alcoholic.

It's like being a bartender.  The person who doesn't really like to drink all that much isn't likely to be fascinated by single malt Scotch, but might really enjoy a pina colada. So you sell them the pina colada.

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Reply by dirkwdeyoung, Feb 9, 2011.

Depends on what fruit means to you. For me a French Wine with suttle, but complex fruit is Chateauneuf du Pape, almost everyone likes it. I think the Tempranillo grape wines from spain have a nice fruit character and from US for example, for just plain fun, how about the Cline, Big Red Truck?

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Reply by napagirl68, Feb 10, 2011.

Can I ask a question here?  Moscato... such as one I recently tasted, which had an effervescence to it (frizzante??) was listed at only 5% alcohol, yet listed a whopping ~120 calories/serving on the label.  I always thought that high ETOH equals high sugar which equals higher calories (hence reds typically, but not always, being higher in calories than white).  How is this possible, when a butter bomb chard charts out at ~90 calories?  I am just curious because when I tasted the moscato, I thought SWEET.  Is sugar added?  If not, why doesn't it exhibit high alcohol?  Shorter processing times?

Sorry for venturing off topic :-)

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Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Feb 10, 2011.

Cali, yep, I knew what you meant.  Misspelling of 'palate' is just a personal pet peeve.

Cheers.

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Reply by Nancy Hawks Miller, Feb 15, 2011.

Now, returning to our regular programming:  Wessel792: For whites I'd look for Riesling, Gewurtztraminer, Viognier. Just lovely and available in every price range. For reds, Beaujolais types (Gamay is the grape), Barbera, Zins that aren't too high octane. There are more and more wine shops with tasting bars so you can try before you buy. Check it out and have fun!

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Feb 16, 2011.

NG - I suspect it is made with high residual sugar [or added sugar for cheaper wines. 

I think that the high rsidual sugar will provide higher calories.

One crazy colleague defines a palette as a female friend - the feminine version of pal!!!


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