Wine Talk

Snooth User: embarr

Barolo Giribaldi 1998, 1999, 2002

Posted by embarr, Feb 7, 2013.

All this Wine talk over the passed couple days (yes mylady Amour and James it's all your fault LOL) gave me a sudden urge to check my wine cellar and, low and behold, I still had 3 bottles of Barolo I had bought (if I recall correctly from Royal Coffee in Pattaya) 4 or 5 years ago.

For some strange reason I really quite felt in the mood for a nice Barolo, perhaps becuase my girlfriend had used some Occitane Roses hand cream and the scent was still lingering in the air.

So I started by bringing the 98 riserva and the 99 out (didn't stop there ;-) ), opened both and in the anticipation I put the 99 in the cabinet (room temp's around 35 right now) while the 98 riserva filled the air with that distinct scent of grapes being plucked in the mysty hills of Piemonte and earthy truffle scent being carried by the early morning fog...a hint of alcohol joining the nuances filling the air as the wine was slowly reaching drinking temperature. After 3 bottles I just needed to talk about this wine and share the experience...

I had never been a great fan of Giribaldi wines (like so many other big producers)...but this bottle imbodied the typical tannin and rose scents that makes barolo so appealing and unique. Full boddied, well balanced, great tannins, lightly fruity. I don't really know where this wine scores for "experts" but in my book it is in the 90s. My girlfriend took an instant liking to it as well and between the 2 of us we finished all 3 bottles.

Although certainly inibirated by then, the 2002 was definately better then the 98 and the 99's the last of the pack though still a 90 in my book, all 3 well consistent and certainly a recommandation for people liking the unique taste of Barolo.

I would say

Barolo Giribaldi 1999  90p.

Barolo Giribaldi Riserva1998 92p.

Barolo Giribaldi 2002 95p.

Replies

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Reply by EMark, Feb 7, 2013.

Sounds pretty decadent to me.  Lucky you.  ;-)

Thanks for the report.  I am just now learning about Barolo.  There are are other participants here on the Snooth Forum (including one Snooth Editor) who are very passionate about Barolo.  Most of my knowledge is vicarious, but I am taking steps to get my own experience.  The problem I have is that I will probably die long before anything currently on the market is optimally drinkable.  Oh well.  I have to keep telling myself that some people have real problems.

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Reply by embarr, Feb 8, 2013.

Mark...that's where a wine cellar comes in. My first realy cheap house I bought over 20 years ago in Canada, I looked for one with a cellar adequate for wine...there are so many on the market right it's not even funny.  Unless you're on the move of course, then you do need the right connections and places to enjoy a bottle of Barolo at it's right deinkable age. If you ever are in Montreal I suggest you visit Novello...tell Sebastian or Bob that I sent you...and enjoy the best Barolo or Primitivo available outside Italy.

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Reply by amour, Feb 8, 2013.

I also use L'Occitane Roses handcream and enjoy Barolo Wines,!!!!!!!!

As I said before on Snooth, years ago, I was introduced to Barolo by an Italian in my London Law student days....will follow up directly on your thread...Thanks for starting it! Good Barolo came to London...good GRAPPA too!

There are great happenings in the Piedmont's Barolo district as well as Barbaresco!

I had some fair Barolo in the St. Denis area of Montreal, where I often ate...a great student section in those days...1980's.  But as was emphasised...they need aging, of course.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Feb 8, 2013.

Emark, check over at K&L and see if they have any of those Aldo Conternos left.  They had some stuff you won't have to live forever to open.  Also, the regional bottles (just labeled Barolo) are often made for earlier drinking, though you would still want to give them a long decant, or so I'm told. 

I've been drinking a bit of nebbiolo over the last couple years, and I mentioned Ghemme as one entry into that grape elsewhere.  But I also have that feeling of frustration--with Nebbiolo you get the idea that you should have been into wine when you turned 21, and should have bought stuff you couldn't even afford without any idea if it would ever be to your liking.  I'm willing to give Barolo some leeway that I don't give to upper end Burgundy because it's close to impossible to get Nebbiolo that isn't from Piemonte, while there is plenty of good PN all over the world.  For my money, a lot of it that is more enjoyable than the burgundy I have tried.  (On the other hand, I have pretty much given up on Chardonnay from anywhere but Chablis.)  The good news is that my local wine shops do carry Baroli that have a little age already--not at all unusual to find a 2004 around, whereas getting, say, Brunello that's older than 2007 (unless it's Riserva--but talk about a leap in price!).

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Reply by EMark, Feb 8, 2013.

Alex, I am on the same page with you on the concept of having a cellar.  Unfortunately, as friend Foxall indicates, very few of us (and, certainly, unfortunately, not I) have the foresight or the wherewithal to invest in long-aging wines when we are younger. 

Sorry to say, also, that I probably won't be visiting Montreal in the forseeable future.  I agree, though, that it is a great town.

Now, I have to pull your leg a bit.  I have a hard time submitting a posting here without some sort of attempt at mirth.  In your response you made a comment about "enjoying a bottle of Barolo . . . "  My friend, by my count you enjoyed three (3) bottles in one evening.  If that isn't decandency, then it is within a very very small delta of it. 

Foxall, you may recall that I have mentioned that my wife is the best because she is happy with relatively inexpesive white wines--e.g., Clos du Bois Chardonnay.  (OK, there are multiple other reasons why she is the best.)  I may have made a mistake recently.  We just finished a cruise, and she learned about Chassagne-Montrachet and Premier Cru Chablis.  Oh well, now I have to budget for her upgraded tastes.

 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Feb 8, 2013.

The good news is that, compared to Chassagne-Montrachet, even premier cru Chablis is reasonable.  The better news is that you can enjoy a bottle of it with her--although maybe you were okay with sipping her California chardonnay already.  I think Chablis is a comparative bargain in the wine world, although it takes a little bit of work to sort it all out.  Much less expensive than Cote d'Or white burgundy and better suits my taste.  For $25 I can get really good wine from Fourchaume.  Finding minerally, complex chardonnay from California is a lost cause.  Vrignaud, LeFlaive, and Malandes all make bottles that I've seen at that price. 

Another value play right next door to Chassagne Montrachet is St. Aubin.  You can get premier cru wines for around $20 if you shop around.  LeFlaive, Marc Colin and others make nice bottles.  Not Chassagne-Montrachet, but well made.  I wouldn't necessarily even get too hung up about the 1er status, just try some things and see what you like.

Now I sound like a Burgundy lover.  Somebody stop me.

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Reply by embarr, Feb 9, 2013.

Amour...L'Occitane does have some great products and all natural don't they. My girlfriend is totally stock on L'Occitane ever since I intorduced her to it...and Wines now too, as I learned about her tastes and slowly steared her towards more complex and full boddied wines. I have to admit, for someone that had never had a drop of wine before she met me she came a long way in the passed 5 years. 

Mark, my GF doesn't drink in the amounts I do but, I did have her help with those 3 bottles. I agree it is total decadence to go through three bottles of Barolo in one evening without even a hint of a reason or special occasion...but it is what it's all about, isn't it?

Ohh yes, the St.Denis and St.Laurent area with the little bars and restaurants...makes Montreal quite unique, no other city is as charming and metropolitan as Montreal...I spent quite some nights around there and I recall it was there I started trying my first Californian wines, the first Nebbiolos from outside Italy, which, of course, left me with mixed feelings about wines from California. Today some have gotten the Nebbiolo growing right, but we have to admit...very few Nebbiolo wines that are not Barolo or Barbaresco come even close to live up to what this wine can be.

Talking about decadence Mark...and aging wines for that matter, I still have a couple bottles of 1945 Barolo and two dozen various 1962s, which I will go through on my birthday party. I think I will start with the two Giacomo Anselma, then go onto the Borgogno e figli and work my way to the Pio Cesare...of course with a select small group of friends who will help me BBQ a few suckling piglets HongKong style, a perfect match, and will make it a memorable weekend long party.

One of my friends is killing the piglets as I write (an activity I never partake on, even though i do make pancetta, coppa, lonza and salami afterwards...yess, salametti al Barolo and coppa ubriaca as well). In a few hours the BBQ will start and stay lit until monday evening, by which time we'll be ripe for some Grappa di Barolo...the bottles are already out of the cellar and in the cabinet, my girlfriend polishing the glasses and decanters' on hand. Decadence is calling...Cheers everyone.

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Reply by Anna Savino, Feb 10, 2013.

Even 2007s and 2008s are drinking relatively well for being youngins! 2008 is (will be) a great classic vintage!

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Reply by amour, Feb 11, 2013.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY EMBARR!

What are some of the best Grappa, in your opinion?

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Reply by Anna Savino, Feb 11, 2013.

oh wow.. grappa... well i would have to ask my husband about that. He loves a very small producer's called Cascina I Carpini, Romano Levi (a little harsher), Montanaro, or high quality grappa di moscato (a bit smoother) ..

 

Do you like Grappa AMOUR?

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Reply by amour, Feb 11, 2013.

Yes..I do!

As I said before, I was introduced to GRAPPA as a Law student in London, England, by a friend from Piedmonte, Italy.

He actually brought it over from Italy...I also had GRAPPA with coffee.

I had it in Italy as well.

Great on very very cold days!

There is a Grappa available here in Miami at Total Wine.

I intend to purchase it.  (Will let you know the name this week).

Thanks in advance for your up-coming info on best Grappa!

I love the intensity of Grappa....but drink it only in small quantities!!!

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Reply by Anna Savino, Feb 11, 2013.

I couldn't stand it but now am starting to appreciate it by "wetting your lips" with it...as my husband says. It definitely is an acquired taste. I prefer infusions from here in the Alps with wild flowers etc. La Spiritosa makes some great ones:) 

Speaking of digestives and Barolo.. ever tried Barolo Chinato? yum!

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Reply by amour, Feb 12, 2013.

Banfi Grappa Montalcino 750 ml   $40. U.S....this is what I am about to purchase!

Any good?

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Reply by EMark, Feb 12, 2013.

I also would like to tap the collective wisdom of the Forum, but I am going back to Barolo.  (BTW, most of what I know about Sake I learned from James Bond.)

I mentioned that I had my first Barolo (that I can remember) a few weeks ago.  It was 2006 Stefano Farina, and it really blew my socks off.  Is anybody familiar with this one?  I happened to see it in a store, yesterday, and picked it up for $32.99.  I also picked up a much more spendy Conterno 2008.  Does anybody know anything about that one?

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Reply by embarr, Mar 18, 2013.

Hi Again...back after recovering LOL

Thank you Amour...a great party, ended Tuesday morning ;-)

When it comes to Grappa I love Jacopo Poli, they have a few great ones including an amazing Moscato-Merlot but the truly amazing one is the Barrique, it's aged in small wooden casks and bottled at full strength, right now the 1995 is in circulation, has 55% vol alcohol. Sorry to say we killed the last bottle I had left

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Reply by embarr, Mar 18, 2013.

Sorry I just logged in again after a while and noticed I had my answer to Ms Amour still sitting there waiting for a "publish"...I guess I wasn't fully recovered yet when I posted it despite my opening statement. I apologize

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Mar 18, 2013.

Emark,

Which Conterno, Giacomo, Aldo, Paulo, Diego? There are a few and the wines are very different.

I just saw a great deal on some Barolo but deleted the offer. I'll be sure to post them her in the forum when I see them.

 

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Reply by EMark, Mar 19, 2013.

Greg, below is a snap of the front label.  It appears to be Giacomo Conterno

 

 

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Mar 19, 2013.

That's the Mac Daddy of non-reserva Barolo. Long lived and powerful coming from a single vineyard, Cascina Francia, in the Serralunga sub appellation of Barolo. These are wines famous for their dark fruits, medicinal notes, and powerful tannins. 2008 is a bit of an earlier drinking vintage so this might be ready to pop in ten years! Simply put Barolo Cascina Francia is one of the world's greatest wines and though even spendy a notable value.

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Reply by EMark, Mar 20, 2013.

Thanks, Greg.  I guess I lucked out.  Ten years is still within the drinking window of my expected life span.   :-)


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