Wine Talk

Snooth User: JonDerry

All Newbies - Welcome

Posted by JonDerry, Feb 28, 2013.

First off, welcome aboard. You'll find some easy going wine enthusiasts here along with some very knowledgeable folks.

We do get our fair share of spam here as you can see, so I'd recommend to wait on linking your blogs or websites until you get to know a few of the regulars first.

Would also recommend just jumping in to the discussions already in progress or if you'd like to create a new one, ask a question, share a story or your background with the intent of checking back in. Most of the time we get an "introduce yourself" post and that's all, so participation is appreciated!

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Replies

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Reply by Michael Bennett, Mar 1, 2013.

Just found this site via google while looking for some historical info on a Portuguese winery.

I'm a retired commercial winemaker with 35 years experience mostly in wineries in New Zealand. I've had success in many wine shows but my main obsession has been avoiding and speaking against the "affectation" frequently found in wine people. Using adjectives like 'cheeky' and ' deep' don't have any relevence to assessing a wines attraction.

In case anybody has heard of them I was assistant winemaker at Villa Maria Wines then winemaker for Te Mata Estate Winery in Hawkes Bay where I was responsible for winning several gold awards and also the top trophy at the National Wine Show.

Anyway that's me and now I'm feeling embarrassed for talking about me. :-)

Michael Bennett

Hawkes Bay

New Zealand

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Reply by outthere, Mar 1, 2013.

How cheeky Michael ;)

Welcome to the forum!

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Reply by JonDerry, Mar 1, 2013.

Welcome to the fold Michael. Have heard of the Hawkes Bay region but don't know much about it.

What are some of the best wines you've produced and tasted in your career?

Any trophies in the cellar?

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Reply by EMark, Mar 1, 2013.

Seconding Jon's sentiment, I would also like to welcome all newcomers

Specifically, I would also, of course, like to welcome you, Michael.  Yes I have had Villa Maria wines.  I'm not familiar with Te Mata, but always eager to learn.

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Reply by amour, Mar 1, 2013.

Which Portuguese Winery were you checking out, if you do not mind saying, please?

I feel that great things are happening, though quietly, in Douro!

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Reply by Michael Bennett, Mar 1, 2013.

The winery was Barros Almeida in about 1922. I have a fascinating book which was, I guess, a promotional produced by them full of real photos, (not page printed) and brief descriptions at the bottom. I'll post an example:

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Reply by Michael Bennett, Mar 1, 2013.

Oops! I'll get the systems sorted soon!

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Reply by dwstanley, Mar 2, 2013.

What goes with a loaded baked potato? Like it with jalapenos, salsa, spicy chow chow, ham or turkey, and pepper jack cheese. No butter or sour cream. I had a merlot/cab blend tonight because I was expecting something different for dinner, not bad, but lke some advise.

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Reply by amour, Mar 3, 2013.

Michael, quite interesting!

Thanks for sharing with us!

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Reply by Rosette, Mar 3, 2013.

I so look forward to being a part of this forum.  Thank you all.

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Reply by EMark, Mar 3, 2013.

DW, I think you may have stumped the band.  I always have a tough time matching wines to starches.  Your Merlot/Cab experience is interesting.  If you want to stick with the red wine theme, you might look at a Spanish wine like a Rioja.  The cool thing about Spanish wines is that they are still pretty reasonably priced.  If you want to try a completely different approach, let's look at this as a Spicy plate as opposed to  starchy.  Spicy foods often go well with Gewurztraminers.  Another idea might be Viognier.  Good luck, and please come back to us and tell us what you've tried and how it worked.

Welcome, Rosette.  Tell us a bit about yourself.  Where are you from.  What do you like?

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Reply by LoveMuscadine, Mar 6, 2013.

The title of this thread "Wine Talk" seemed a good place for this. If, on the other hand, someone knows where I might get the info I seek in another thread, please direct me. I am looking for information about adjectives and/or words that continue to appear about wines. Is there a place/thread/post where I can ask about the definitions of some of these words? Yes, I can google and bing and wiki and websters, but I want to ask a "wine person" what they mean, in terms of wine. In my short time as a wine drinker, what I HAVE learned is this, what someone else thinks is NOT what I should purchase wine by. I like sweet wine, but, I am from Mississippi, where "sweet tea" is a staple in the home. So, sweet to someone else, may not be sweet to me. I am seeing that trial and error, like and dislike, drink and pour out, is the game. Words like, Moscato... Merlot and Cab...Pinot Noir, it's very confusing. Is there a glossary or dictionary for the wine lover? Correction BEGINNING wine lover.........Thanks

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Reply by amour, Mar 6, 2013.

LOVEMUSCADINE.....it is never too late to start!

Should you wish a firm foundation in wine; go both to the bookshop and the library

and start familiarizing yourself with basic wine books.

Start with a basic book and move on.....it will take along time, but you will enjoy your progress.

Coupled with snooth, you would amaze yourself how much you will learn....and above all: GO TO AS MANY TASTINGS AS YOU CAN!

Get to know the various grapes, the various regions of several countries.

Definitely, get a wine map of France!

I am sure that many others will be happy to advise you.

Stick with Snooth, whatever you do or do not do!

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Reply by Harlemknite, Mar 6, 2013.

Amazing! I am totally new to wine, at least in the way that I can totally appreciate. My biggest problem is where to start and I read LOVEMUSCADINE post ..lol right on time. Looking fwd to learning and contributing.

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Reply by amour, Mar 6, 2013.

Thanks for joining us on Snooth, HARLEMKNITE!

Where are you located?

We all enjoy sharing info here and look forward to your reaction!

Snooth is a very rewarding experience indeed, regardless of your level.

Happy wine journey to you!

Go to as many tasting sessions as you can; even merely interacting with other wine lovers is helpful, as it will enhance your interest and speed-up your general wine development, so to speak!

Cheers!

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Reply by JonDerry, Mar 6, 2013.

Think most folks around here would advise on tasting through as much wine as possible to find what you like before getting books involved.

The best way to do this could be to visit a tasting bar where you can buy a card and try a taste of a variety of wines. If no wine bars around, try a local wine shop, hopefully they can offer tastings or recommendations on wines depending if you like sweet wine, dry wine w/ a little bit of sweetness to it, etc.

Love Muscadine: Sweet wine can be Sauternes or Barsac from France, Port from Portugal, Madeira, from Madeira, Late Harvest Zinfandel (or Semillon, etc.) from California. Moscato from Italy, there are all kinds. Hope you can find some locally. Standard dry reds made from Cabernet, Merlot, Pinot Noir tend not to be very sweet at all, though they can have a little bit of sweetness. German Rieslings might also be a great sweet spot for you. Hungarian Tokaji as well!

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Reply by netdigiam, Mar 6, 2013.

Hello! I'm a newbie and glad to be a member.  I enjoy red wines, especially cabs... I'm from NJ...

I was searching the web to find out what to do about a dilema... my husband mistakenly opened our

17yo daughters bottle of "baby wine" given to us by my dad.  He only poured a couple of ounces out and into spaghetti sauce ( I can't stop wagging my head!)... it's sentimental more than anything else.  It is a cheaper merlot (Turning Leaf California- 1995)... would it be ok to to freeze the bottle? I have recorked it... it has several inches of space at the top so it would be able to expand...  I double wrapped it in heavy-duty foil... could I keep it like this in the freezer for about 3 years until she is 21?... What a stupid thing to happen... was also thinking of buying another bottle from her year that is known to age well (vintage port maybe?) just in case my salvaging idea doesn't work... looking forward to learning more about wine!  Thanks so much 

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Reply by Harlemknite, Mar 6, 2013.

Amour I am currently in the DC Metro area. Its great to hear about having to go to as many tastings as I can because I just ddiscovered a place that has tastings every Tuesday and Thursdays from 5-7 pm I can head there right after work! ..lol Really looking forward to learning and experiencing as much as I can!!

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Reply by LoveMuscadine, Mar 7, 2013.

Thanks to Amour and Jonderry for the advise and info. As a child I always heard "The only dumb question, is the one you don't ask" so, I'm asking... Is there a procedure or process to "breathing" a wine before drinking it? Specifically, is there a magic number of minutes after opening a bottle, before I should pour and/or drink it? Also, why are we doing this? (I told y'all I was new) Thanks

Welcome Harlemnite

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Reply by JonDerry, Mar 7, 2013.

Don't beat yourself up over this (or your husband!) Netdigiam...unfortunately that wine "Turning Leaf" just wasn't made to last decades, it was made to drink on release or a couple years after at the most. The wine was probably already close to unenjoyable before opening it, and I'm pretty sure it must be gone now. Wouldn't freeze it! Glass can explode in that situation. Best just to pour a glass as soon as possible and let us know what it tastes like if you could. Sounds like it should be interesting.

Other options for 1995 could definitely be Vintage Port, or if you like Cab, some French Bordeaux will be drinking very well, though you should probably be spending in the $60-100+ range and from a reputable shop like Gary's, Wine Library, etc. 

Harlemknite - Sounds like a good situation to be in, make sure to attend as many of those tastings as you can and you'll be off and running.

LM - Don't stress too much about letting the wine breathe. See how it tastes right after opening, and take your time with each glass. Note if and how the wine changes after being opened 1 or 2 hours, or more. When done drinking for the night, put a cork in it and stick it in the fridge. Should be good the next day, and if it's a really good, complex wine, it might be even better on day 2

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