Wine Talk

Snooth User: peitsche

2009 futures

Posted by peitsche, Aug 12, 2010.

my daughter was born last November and I want to put together a nice selection of quality wine that is likely to still taste good 20-25 years from now. I am going to buy some (red) Bourdeaux futures with a couple of friends and they are doing some research on what to get in the $100/bottle range. I am wondering what other reds or whites I should consider when looking for other varities that can be enjoyed at special occasions many years from now. I am a newb but willing to learn...;-) thanks!

Replies

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Reply by peitsche, Aug 12, 2010.

btw, I saw the other thread about birth year bottles but I thought because of the different vintages (95 and 97 vs. 2009), I would get away with a new thread. If not, tell me so and I will ask my question in that other thread.

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Reply by gregt, Aug 12, 2010.

Beaujolais and the Loire. And you don't have to buy futures for those - just buy the wine, taste it, and if you like it, buy more.  With Bordeaux, I'd just wait.  I don't think you gain much from futures financially.

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 12, 2010.

So Greg, what Beaujolais labels do you think will be good in 25-30 years?

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Reply by MReff, Aug 12, 2010.

Cannot go wrong with Rdige Monte Bello, I picked up a 6 pack from them in 08 for my son.

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Reply by peitsche, Aug 12, 2010.

Greg, I know that it might not make sense financially to buy the Bordeaux futures. But I like the idea of ordering something that won't arrive for another two years or so. ;-)

MReff, I thought the 2008 won't be shipped until next year?

 

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 12, 2010.

Peitsche, you're in a much better position than the father who is having to play catchup on the '95 and '97 vintages with what remains circulating in the market these days. You have a whole world of wine to consider. Why start with the most expensive choices in the world (other than DRC, anyway)? Futures might've been one intelligent option a decade ago, but they don't make much sense now. Waiting until the bottles actually hit market is the smarter call, especially since it doesn't look like the economy anywhere (other than Singapore, anyway) is going to be taking off anytime soon.

Come up with a plan regarding California, France (all over, not just Bordeaux), Italy, Spain and elsewhere, and then hunt for the best prices online as the bottles come to market is what I recommend. That should keep you interestingly busy over the next several years. If you want to have perfect provenance, you could also buy directly from the wineries themselves. And as I mentioned in that other thread, don't just think of Bordeaux blends, but a whole range of other reds as well as whites, sweet or otherwise. I soon found with my own daughters that it's a lot better to have multiple options rather than just a few bottles of one or two labels or even types of wine....

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Reply by Stephen Harvey, Aug 12, 2010.

09 Australian Rieslings from Clare are very good

Grossett Polish Hill

Grossett Watervale

Petaluma Hanlin Hill

Clos Clare

Tim Adams

These are all very good Rieslings which drink very well fresh with great fruit and acid but will also last 10-20years+

Australian Reds are not out in enough quantity at top end to yet make any recommendations

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Reply by MReff, Aug 13, 2010.

correct peitsche,, I was jeseting, I ordered it last year or the year before for delivery in 2011 or 2012.

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Reply by peitsche, Aug 14, 2010.

Originally posted by dmcker:

"Come up with a plan regarding California, France (all over, not just Bordeaux), Italy, Spain and elsewhere, and then hunt for the best prices online as the bottles come to market is what I recommend.  And as I mentioned in that other thread, don't just think of Bordeaux blends, but a whole range of other reds as well as whites, sweet or otherwise."

 

Thanks, that's exactly what I'm after: a plan regarding the various regions and types of wines. Let's say I want to limit myself to 10 different bottles of wine. I have the red Bordeaux already covered. That leaves nine other regions/types of wines to go. What would people here recommend? Again, keep in mind that all of them should be 2009 vintage and all of them should be aging well for at least 20 years.

 

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Reply by dmcker, Aug 14, 2010.

Before getting into the details of each area's recommendation, I'd definitely recommend you consider getting far more than 10 bottles total. Ideally you'll want multiple bottles of the same wine for a special event or two. And even when a bottle each of two different wines will do, you'll find all sorts of occasions when you'll want that (not just five-and-you're out). If budget's the issue, you'll be able to spread your purchasing out over the next several years without too much trouble....

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Reply by peitsche, Aug 15, 2010.

forget I ever said anything about bottles. 10 different wines. ;-)

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Reply by gregt, Aug 16, 2010.

 D - same ones that usually go the distance.  Lapierre is a complete crapshoot but from the Fleurie, perhaps Clos de Riolette, Descombes, Potel Aviron Morgon, Brun's wines, Burgaud, those are a few that I've had luck with.


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