dalluva

Location: Los Gatos, CA

Italian wine geek, importer, certified sommelier, globe-trotting foodie, lover of all things Italian, technologist, serial entrepreneur

dalluva's Wines

Showing 1-11 of 15 wines total


Refine My Wines:
Refine Your Search

Show Only

See lists

dalluva's Rating

from 0 glasses to 5 glasses

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:48am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $47.87



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:48am
    From my online review of Donnafugata Ben Rye 2007 at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ Off the southern coast of Sicily, smack dab in the middle of the Mediterranean and a stones throw away from rebellious Tunisia lies the tiny, sirocco-swept island of Pantelleria. This island is heavenly to visit on holiday in July and August, but there’s a drying wind that constantly blows late in the fall, desiccating the Zibibbo grape (think Moscato) grown here into nearly raisins. It gets so windy here that the wine producers grow the grapes in low, circular bundles to protect the grappoli (bunches) from being knocked off the vine. This is extreme wine making at its most passionate, and Pantelleria has a long history of making mind-blowing sweet wines. Donnafugata makes about 10,000 bottles of this rare and extraordinary wine, which they named Ben Ryé, from the Arabic “Son of the Wind”. The nose has a whole lot going on, with sweet spices, brown sugar and stone fruits wafting up from the glass. On the palate it’s a kaleidoscope of flavors – apricot, grilled peaches, vanilla, baking spices, and remarkably balanced acidity that makes for a not-too-sweet experience. I drink this as a dessert in itself, but you can pair it with panna cotta, crème brulee, or just dip little almond biscotti in it. If you’re into bleu cheeses, pair them with Ben Ryé. Both the 2007 and 2008 vintages are fantastic, so pick up whichever one you can find. If this wine doesn’t blow you away, I’ll turn in my Sommelier certification.

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:47am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $37.44



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:47am
    From my online review of Donnafugata Ben Rye 2008 at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ Off the southern coast of Sicily, smack dab in the middle of the Mediterranean and a stones throw away from rebellious Tunisia lies the tiny, sirocco-swept island of Pantelleria. This island is heavenly to visit on holiday in July and August, but there’s a drying wind that constantly blows late in the fall, desiccating the Zibibbo grape (think Moscato) grown here into nearly raisins. It gets so windy here that the wine producers grow the grapes in low, circular bundles to protect the grappoli (bunches) from being knocked off the vine. This is extreme wine making at its most passionate, and Pantelleria has a long history of making mind-blowing sweet wines. Donnafugata makes about 10,000 bottles of this rare and extraordinary wine, which they named Ben Ryé, from the Arabic “Son of the Wind”. The nose has a whole lot going on, with sweet spices, brown sugar and stone fruits wafting up from the glass. On the palate it’s a kaleidoscope of flavors – apricot, grilled peaches, vanilla, baking spices, and remarkably balanced acidity that makes for a not-too-sweet experience. I drink this as a dessert in itself, but you can pair it with panna cotta, crème brulee, or just dip little almond biscotti in it. If you’re into bleu cheeses, pair them with Ben Ryé. Both the 2007 and 2008 vintages are fantastic, so pick up whichever one you can find. If this wine doesn’t blow you away, I’ll turn in my Sommelier certification.

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:46am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $19.99



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:46am
    From my online review of Vietti Roero Arneis 2009 at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ If you like Pinot Grigio, think of Vietti Roero Arneis 2009 as its more fresh, extroverted friend – the perfect guest everyone likes to have around at a party. Crisp green apples, grapefruit, and pears come through on the palate of this off-dry (not sweet) white, and the nose has sexy (yes, sexy) hints of mint and jasmine. If you’re a fan of Pinot Grigio or like Sauvignon Blanc, you’ll fall in love with Vietti’s Roero Arneis. Roero Arneis likes to be consumed young, so it’s perfect for summer food fair so long as you’re drinking the latest vintage. Pair this lovely with anything you’d pair with Sauvignon Blanc – Grilled and roasted chicken and game birds, sautéed scallops, anything with goat cheese, and summer vegetable dishes like insalata caprese, grilled peppers, roasted asparagus. This even goes with many Tex-Mex dishes. Enlighten and impress your guests by adding Vietti Roero Arneis 2009 to your shopping list. I’m pretty sure you’ll become a lifelong fan of this wine.

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:42am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $22.74



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:42am
    From my online review of Russiz Pinot Grigio 2009 at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ I must admit, most Italian Pinot Grigio wines are too light bodied and haven’t impressed me – until now. This one knocked my socks off. Russiz Superiore is a big producer in the Collio Goriziano DOC zone (Collio for short), way up in the northeast corner of Italy in the province of Friuli-Venezia Giulia. They make a gaggle of mono-varietal wines that are quite good, but my favorite is their Collio Pinot Grigio 2009. Take a sniff of this wine and young red apples, bosc pears and carnation flowers immediately hit you. I’m content just to enjoy the nose on this wine, but it invites you in for much more. On the palate you’ll find all that fruit, plus honeydew melon and a tartness of lime that give it a crisp flavor that pairs wonderfully with summer food fare. One thing you’ll note with this wine, and most Friuli wines, is the significant minerality. The growing region was submerged in the Mediterranean in ancient times, and the soil today has layers of limestone, sandstone and clay that pleasantly come through on the palate. Pinot Grigio is super-easy for pairing with food. If you’re frying or grilling shrimp, fish, or chicken, this vino is the bomb. I use Russiz Pinot Grigio as a perfect pairing for pre-dinner antipasto – roasted red peppers, bresaola, mild and creamy cheeses, marinated artichokes. Pair it with gnocchi con pesto or any pasta dish with clams or mussels, it’s a great alternative to Ligurian white wines (which also love to party). If you’re a Pinot Grigio fan, and I know many of you are, you’ll adore this wine.

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:40am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $25.99



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:40am
    From my online review of Bisceglia's Gudarra 2006 at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ If you’re a fan of big reds, you’re going to love this wine. Bring a glass of Gudarrà up to your nose and you’ll sense dark plum and blackberry fruits, dried savory herbs, and earth – lots of it. Sip this jet-black wine and be prepared for the explosion: jammy dark fruits and leather, tobacco and wild fennel, lots of dark earth and a hint of violets. Fantastic. There’s a reason they call Aglianico del Vulture the “Barolo of the South.” Biceglia’s Gudarrà Aglianico del Vulture 2006 is a huge value for what you get in the glass, and you can’t go wrong pulling this one out for your next barbeque. Give it a try.

  • Jun 18, 2011 at 11:37am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $27.99



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2011 at 11:37am
    My thoughts on Felsina Chianti Classico Riserva 2007, from my online review at http://www.dalluva.com/wine-journal/5-italian-wines-that-know-how-to-party/ Felsina arguably makes the most popular, food-friendly Chianti Classico ever crafted. You’ll find this very quaffable red on the menus of Italian restaurants in America everywhere. Save yourself time searching for the perfect party red and reach for Felsina’s Riserva 2007 – you can’t go wrong. On the nose you’ll find ripe red fruits like raspberries and bing cherries, light fennel and a hint of smokiness from the aging barrels. The palate goes wild with more raspberry, crabapple, a touch of cranberry, and aromas of violets. The acidity is balanced with the fruit and tannin, and the finish is smooth and long. You’ll notice that this wine evolves beautifully in the glass over time, becoming more elegant with expanding aromas of leather and more fennel. Felsina’s 2007 riserva is truly a classic in the Chianti style. It’s sure to be a talking point as your guests savor this wine.

  • Jun 20, 2010 at 10:14am

    Previously available for $29.99



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 20, 2010 at 10:14am
    At the pinnacle of Frank Grace and Gerhard Hirmer's creativity is this stunning 2004 Gratius (3 glasses in the Gambero Rosso's "Vini d'Italia" annual wine guide), a Sangiovese "in purezza" (pure Sangiovese) Super Tuscan. You’ll find an elegant bouquet of ripe red and dark fruits like black cherry, coffee and a touch of cocoa powder, with firm tannins and a finish that keeps going on and on. Gratius is one of my favorites in the region and reflects the strength of this wine making team. Pair Molino di Grace’s Gratius wine with rich red meat dishes like the succulent Bistecca Fiorentina, a 2+ pound T-bone grilled over hardwood and served rare — the quintessential Tuscan dish found at osterie and ristoranti throughout the region. Another favorite of mine is pairing Gratius with beef steak served tagliata style. Simply grill your favorite cut rare (like flank or top sirloin) then slice it on the bias into thin strips and briefly sauté them in a bit of olive oil, whole black pepper corns, fresh rosemary and salt to taste. For rabbit fans, the Chianti Classico 2005 normale would go well with rabbit in a cacciatore style. And for the elegant Gratius 2004, look no further than a savory lamb dish. Pair it with a boneless leg roasted Abruzzi-style, or with chops grilled over hardwood and rosemary wands Cin Cin! Michael www.dalluva.com/wine-journal

  • Jun 20, 2010 at 10:07am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $22.99



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 20, 2010 at 10:07am
    Frank Grace and Gerhard Hirmer of Molino di Grace offered their first Chianti Classico with the modest production year of 1998. With total production potential of 130,000 bottles (about 11,000 cases), the team chose to limit their offering to just a few wines that best show the potential of the terroir and the winemaking team. The 2005 Chianti Classico (1 bicchiere on Gambero Rosso's Vini d'Italia scale) is a decent "normale" with pleasant aromas of dark fruits like plums and blackberries, and mineral notes of flint on the palate. There’s a game and leather undertone on the nose that’s quite pleasant, and on the palate the classic dark cherry and tannins of Sangiovese come through clearly. Beyond a doubt, you’ll want to pair Molino di Grace’s Chianti Classico wine with rich red meat dishes like the succulent Bistecca Fiorentina, a 2+ pound T-bone grilled over hardwood and served rare — the quintessential Tuscan dish found at osterie and ristoranti throughout the region. One of my favorite pairings of Chianti is with beef steak served tagliata style. Simply grill your favorite cut rare (like flank or top sirloin) then slice it on the bias into thin strips and briefly sauté them in a bit of olive oil, whole black pepper corns, fresh rosemary and salt to taste. For rabbit fans, the Chianti Classico 2005 normale would go well with rabbit in a cacciatore style. And for the elegant Gratius 2004, look no further than a savory lamb dish. Pair it with a boneless leg roasted Abruzzi-style, or with chops grilled over hardwood and rosemary wands Cin Cin! Michael www.dalluva.com/wine-journal

  • Jun 18, 2010 at 10:46am
    Compare and Buy

    Average Price: $11.49



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2010 at 10:46am
    I can hear the men in the crowd now: “Pink wine is for chicks.” Well, there are tens of millions of European men who would beg to differ. Granted, many of the wines are full of fruit and so fresh that they should be slapped, but when it comes to hot summer days, a big oaky red wine is not welcome to the summer dinner table. It’s like wearing a wool coat to a pool party. Park your pink perceptions for a moment and try this wine. This lightly pink and bubbly Prosecco comes with a shiny tassel closure and a pink box it comes in. Let’s face it, this producer is targeting women. On the nose it’s full of strawberry and cherry, and the palate is loaded with tart red fruits and citrus like key lime, and even has a nice watermelon finish. Unlike many Prosecco wines, this one is frizzante (lightly sparkling) and thoroughly refreshing, and at 10.5% alcohol you can drink this baby all day long. Serve this wine cool, but not cold – at 50-60 degrees, the fruit really shows well and will delight your senses. Perfect pairings: Serve this sparkler with grilled shrimp or scallops marinated in lime & garlic, or a salad of greens, shaved fennel, orange and walnuts. Also great as an aperitif with marcona almonds and mild, nutty cheeses like aged pecorino or parmigiano Cin Cin! Michael www.dalluva.com/wine-journal

    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 18, 2010 at 10:45am
    I can hear the men in the crowd now: “Pink wine is for chicks.” Well, there are tens of millions of European men who would beg to differ. Granted, many of the wines are full of fruit and so fresh that they should be slapped, but when it comes to hot summer days, a big oaky red wine is not welcome to the summer dinner table. It’s like wearing a wool coat to a pool party. Park your pink perceptions for a moment and try this wine. This lightly pink and bubbly Prosecco comes with a shiny tassel closure and a pink box it comes in. Let’s face it, this producer is targeting women. On the nose it’s full of strawberry and cherry, and the palate is loaded with tart red fruits and citrus like key lime, and even has a nice watermelon finish. Unlike many Prosecco wines, this one is frizzante (lightly sparkling) and thoroughly refreshing, and at 10.5% alcohol you can drink this baby all day long. Serve this wine cool, but not cold – at 50-60 degrees, the fruit really shows well and will delight your senses. Perfect pairings: Serve this sparkler with grilled shrimp or scallops marinated in lime & garlic, or a salad of greens, shaved fennel, orange and walnuts. Also great as an aperitif with marcona almonds and mild, nutty cheeses like aged pecorino or parmigiano Cin Cin! Michael www.dalluva.com/wine-journal

  • Jun 17, 2010 at 10:18am

    Previously available for $335.67



    dalluva's Review:
    Added Jun 17, 2010 at 10:18am
    This beautiful wine completes the Mastrojanni lineup of Montalcino wines, the elegant Botrys 1999 sweet wine is made from Moscato Bianco and Malvasia di Candia varietals. A rich, warming dessert wine with wonderful notes of figs, dates, candied orange rind and saffron on the nose. Sweet and enveloping on the palate, Botrys is a pleasant finish for a special meal with friends. Priced at about $45 retail for a 375 ml bottle, Botrys is heavenly when served with marbled cheeses like Crater Lake Blue from The Rogue Creamery in Oregon, or find a good french or italian sheep's milk bleu. This delicious vin santo is in sort supply and difficult to find, so if you find it, buy it. Cin Cin! Michael

Get Our Wine Newsletter

Receive Snooth's FREE daily emails about value wine picks, commentary from wine insiders, and occasional special offers from Snooth about trusted affiliates.

Thanks for signing up!

We won't ever sell your email address.
Preview a recent email.



Recent Forum PostsView all



Snooth Media Network