Wine Under Water

Is this a fad or is there science behind ageing wine under water?

 


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Wine Under Water In the world of wine it's often tough to separate the fad from the trend or the novel from the avant guard. Take for example organic and/or natural wine. Yes there remains a certain degree of controversy as to what these terms actually mean, but the wines themselves have moved from the backwaters 20 years ago, to the fringes of the wine world ten years ago and today occupy a vital part of the core of industry. There are wineries that use the natural/organic mantle as a marketing ploy of course, and some witless wine writers who continue to question whether natural/organic is here to stay or just a fad; please join us in the 21st century.

Now if you want a fad might I suggest the increasingly popular experiment of ageing wine under water, it seems the sea is preferable, but any deep enough body of water should do. Now I get the idea here, water tends to remain at a relatively constant temperature with changes that are very slow, so given the right temperatures it is an ideal environment for aging wine, but is it really any better than aging wine in a proper cellar? Some producers say yes, I am dubious to say the least, particularly in light of the numerous press releases each of these wines seems to generate. Fad, marketing ploy, or something more serious? Let's take a look at some of the producers ageing wine under water and make up our own minds!

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Comments

  • Snooth User: almondeve
    128786 1

    Gaia out of Santorini is also aging wine under water.

    Jul 10, 2013 at 5:55 PM


  • In August, 2011, Leucadia Red sunk a case of Leucadia Red 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon wine -- BEFORE it became a popular thing to do. Wine was sunk 90 feet under the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Catalina Island and is protected by professional divers. The owner is going to pull up the case soon and then auction off the bottles to benefit a variety of charities -- video here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fL3v...

    Jul 10, 2013 at 7:56 PM


  • While this seems ridiculous, a blind tasting of bottles aged on terra firma vs bottles aged (for the same time period) under water, might make sense. By the way, has my pet rock become a collectible?
    Sed

    Jul 10, 2013 at 10:46 PM


  • Snooth User: gerrad
    79282 57

    might settle the wine 'needs/doesnt need oxygen ingress to develop' arguement once and for all (im with the latter- 'doesnt need oxygen ingress' ..along with Prof.Peynaud)

    Jul 11, 2013 at 12:54 AM


  • Snooth User: EMark
    Hand of Snooth
    847804 6,298

    Sure seems silly to me--not to mention spendy.

    Jul 11, 2013 at 5:46 PM


  • Snooth User: MetteinCoMo
    1302504 313

    Maybe it has to do with the increased pressure in the bottles under water i.e. the molecules in the wine are forced to interact at an increased rate, which could result in differently developed wine. Also, the temperature changes for an object submerged in water is quicker than in air... maybe that could result in a difference? I'm not an expert on wine aged under water, however, I am a scientist and those would be my logical guesses.

    Jul 11, 2013 at 6:39 PM


  • Snooth User: Martin E
    249368 16

    This goes back to discoveries of old wines from shipwrecks that lay under the sea for 100+ years. Examples: (1) Finnish divers recently discovered several crates of champagne and beer from a sunken ship that had been at the bottom of the Baltic Sea for nearly two centuries. The divers expected to taste seawater that had seeped into the bottle but were shocked to discover the wine still tasted fine. (2) By James Suckling, A collection of wines that lay on the ocean floor for nearly 138 years off the Georgia coast were tasted in 1979 and described as "incredibly good."
    I guess constant cool temperature, high pressure, limited oxidation, and environment that prevents corks from drying out helps in this case. Plus, small amount of sea water may add some complexity.

    Jul 14, 2013 at 2:22 PM


  • Snooth User: JT Greeno
    1078174 186

    QUOTE: " Wine was sunk 90 feet under the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Catalina Island and is protected by professional divers. "

    Does that mean there are professional divers protecting the wine 24x7? (probably not)...

    So the wine isn't protected whenever the divers are not present, so what benefit (if any) is there to paying professional divers to protect the wine some of the time?

    Jul 16, 2013 at 3:07 PM


  • Snooth User: Kenner
    118554 32

    Mira, I believe, is repeating the "experiment" again. They must have made enough $ to repeat the submersion.
    For GDP, and anyone else who would like to share my experience with actually tasting the 2009 water vs. land versions, please take a read.

    http://isantemagazine.com/prod/blog...

    Cheers!!

    Nov 08, 2014 at 12:35 PM


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