Start a fight at Thanksgiving with these wine grapes.

 


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Start a fight at Thanksgiving with these wine grapes. Yesterday we focused on consensus wine grapes. The grapes enjoy name recognition, and they won’t threaten the wine newbies at your holiday table. Wine geeks, however, shouldn’t hesitate to share their arcane wine knowledge. Just make sure you have an Everyman wine at your disposal in case your recommendations fall flat.

This Thanksgiving we are grateful to know that people want more wine. Overall wine consumption in the United States increased by 400 million gallons between 1993 and 2018. That’s an additional 1.6 billion bottles over twenty-three years.

Help spread the joy of unique wine grapes this holiday season. People are listening, and it’s really easy. Perhaps you’re already armed with some curious grapes. If not, here are a few favorites to start the conversation. Will they spark dissensus? It’s all delicious wine, enjoyed during one of the United States’ most widely observed holidays – so the answer is, probably not.

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Comments

  • Snooth User: Adriantoth
    2233994 10

    Adding sugar to wine will make it taste sweet I know, too simplistic, but since taste is a personal choice sweeter may be a good or bad thing. If you like sweet wines you an open a bottle, decant it, add sugar to taste and then enjoy every sip. There is no “law” that says you can’t do that.
    Having said that let me discuss a situation where the addition of sugar is beneficial. The “perfect” wine will have a nice balance between the acid and sugar in the finished product. If the original grapes were higher than normal (again a personal value judgment) then the wine may taste “sharp” or “acidic.” In this case, a few percents of remaining sugar in the wine will “balance” the acid taste in the mouth and make the wine “better” too many people. Two grapes where this can apply are Riesling. Both are rather late-ripening grapes and some years and some places the final acid is higher than most people’s taste in dry wines. That is why you normally find Riesling and Vidal Blanc finished in an off-dry method.
    Usually one measures the sugar, with either a dosimeter. But usually (on red wine), when grape skin tends to go to the bottom, it means that it is near to the end of fermenting. Bobbles can give some information: there will be in any case some, but they should be reduced. Fermenting method raises the heat. When the temperature will decrease, it means that fermentation is at the final step. These are estimated methods, but the wine should be dry in any case with such methods, maybe with few remaining sugars. But it could continue fermenting the few residuals also in later phases. There is not a high need for oxygen, with few sugars left. https://essayservices.org/

    Nov 21, 2018 at 1:32 AM


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