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Play Date Wines

Low alcohol wines to sip on while your kids play

 


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Play Date Wines Before you full on assault me, let me point out that the idea for this article came from recent Grapes & Grain Opinion Panel results, a survey of over 10,000 wine consumers. A full third of respondents, some 36%, felt it was usually or always acceptable to drink during a play date, and more than half of respondents (58%) said the same about parental functions involving children (Moms on Wine)!

So while it seems that you might not mind a tipple while watching little Sid and Nancy, I really can’t imagine you wanting to get swashed. Okay, I can imagine that, but lets play this safe and stick to some great low alcohol wines. Sound like a plan? Great, then check out these appealing options!

Photo courtesy sunnyUK via Flickr/CC

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Comments

  • Just discovered my new favorite "playdate" wine: Bone-dry, all aromatics of wonderful muscat, light,and organic-HONAS muscat! Garnet Wines has it for $8.99 !!!!!!

    Mar 07, 2012 at 1:47 PM


  • Snooth User: Richard Foxall
    Hand of Snooth
    262583 2,931

    Not necessarily play-date (GdP going all domestic?) but I was introduced to Kabinetts a few years ago as great wines when you invite folks over in the early afternoon during the summer for a long visit culminating in dinner--enough acid to deal with the slight sweetness, and available in low alcohol levels like 8%, so you can drink all afternoon and still be sober at the start of dinner. Useful in Cali where summer nights cool down so much that you can drink the high octane reds with the barbecued dinner. Everyone can still drive home, too.

    Mar 07, 2012 at 6:34 PM


  • Snooth User: Stevern86
    909211 36

    Greg, I love that you took the risk to propose drinking wine around the kids. I believe that as parents we teach more by example than any other means. Responsible wine drinking with an emphasis on enjoying the flavors and not the alcohol is the example I have set for my daughters. My adult married daughter has chosen not to drink at all. My younger adult daughter is learning moderation. If we hide it and make it a taboo our kids will do that too. Agreed we shouldn't get sloshed in front of the kids. Actually we probably shouldn't get sloshed at all.

    Mar 07, 2012 at 7:45 PM


  • I'm of Italian descent. In Italy, drinking vino is just part of the everyday experience. During special occasions, my Italian grandmother would mix the red wine with water (about half-n-half) and put it into tiny juice glasses for us kids to drink. Most of the time, we wouldn't even finish it. But it removed the "taboo" element that "Stevern86" mentioned in his/her earlier post. We also were Catholic; we witnessed the sanctity of wine in a sacrament. So wine never was something used as a drug. It was revered as something that brought families together (even at Church!).

    Mar 07, 2012 at 11:41 PM


  • Wow, Cosmopolit brought back the memories. Thank you Cosmopolit for the story. While attending a Catholic grammar school in 1954 out side of Paris, my sister and I had to drink a glass of Algerian red wine mixed with water at lunch time. Wine was far cheaper then bottles water and the French Government at the time had to get rig of this lake of Algerian wine being produced by the French farmers in Algeria so we kids were elected to drink it up.
    I would drink my sisters glass as she did not like the flavor and ate her lunch with no liquid refreshment ( we all had brown bags, little tin cans with lids, ), One day the schools mistress noticed that my sister was not drinking and then noticed on her next round of the tables that the glass was empty. She said to my sister, Gigi ( that’s is what I called her instead of Patricia )” You should not drink your wine so quickly.” ( big mouth sister, I have never forgiven her for this ) replied: “ oh no I don’t drink the wine my brother does.”
    That was the end of my two wine glass lunch. From then on I had to trade clay marbles with the other fellows to get a second glass. My sister was given a note to inform my parents that they should supply a thermos with water for my sister to drink, the school could not afford to give her a full glass of water each day. I can assure you all that my marble games during recess improved to maintain my two wine lunches.
    On spring and summer weekends, I was often invited to the Japanese Ambassador’s house which was across the country lane to play with his daughters who were my age while he conducted afternoon parties. I know that I tastes some fantastic wines but god help me I do not know what vintage or from what famous winery. Dad always said that he served the best wines at these functions.
    My family often had wine on Sundays and we cut it with water so as not to get too silly. Even today, I cut an old wine that is a bit over the hill with water and enjoy it with the meal. At the university in Paris and then Grenoble, I noticed that French students drank wine for lunch with water and even the supper meals with wine and water. Many times it was because the wine was not good and the water made it drinkable and the acid cleaned the pallet and made the meal more tasty. But the English and American as well as the Canadian students always got a bit drunk and silly and I think it is because they did not grow up with wine on the table. Therefore they did not appreciated drinking wine with meals ..
    As a young, young man, I appreciated drinking wine for the compliment it gave the meal and knew when I was drinking too much and did not like the experience afterwards, nor the personal drunk feeling as well as what people said about me when I was a bit tipsy. We should teach children the benefit of drinking wine with food. We will probably find that they are not so crazy to go on these binges when they are seniors in high school or go off to college. Wine should be part of eating food it enhances the flavors and enjoyment of the meal.

    Mar 08, 2012 at 2:28 AM


  • Snooth User: Stevern86
    909211 36

    Hey cosmopolitan cowgirl, I too was "weaned" onto wine by my very french mother. At around age 12, I was introduced to a 50/50 red wine water mixture. Wine was revered as you say in my household too. We made wine from scratch including picking the grapes buy the ton. Dad is of Italian descent. Wine was viewed as so much more than just booze. It actually was seen like a side dish to dinner and continues in my household to this day. Lucky for me my wife was raised the same. We really enjoy pairing our glass of wine or two with dinner.

    Mar 09, 2012 at 3:25 PM


  • Snooth User: ciaoana
    212900 5

    Cosmo cowgirl...me too raised in Spain had 50/50 wine at a young age...great memories of my childhood! Thanks!

    Mar 09, 2012 at 11:26 PM


  • Well I can see that others have the same background to drinking when they were young and like the memory. It is good when one can bring joy of drinking wine to another. HERE IS TO THE 50/50 CLUB WITH STEVERN86 AND CIAOANA AS PRESIDING MEMBERS. May the club have more join no one will question their credentials to be members. May I suggest gentleman that you put into your club creed that all members interest themselves with pairing wine with food in the home for better life and romance.
    PS. Thanks for the Cosmopolitan Cowgirl image but I am far from that. Brugman is my middle name and in lower Dutch it stands for Bridgeman. Rose is my grandmother’s first name who was French and taught me much about European cultures and the joy of complimenting foods with wines. I had that wonderful experience of going to a French Catholic school as a boy in the village where we lived while my father flew US Military cargo plans out of Paris air fields. He flew B26s in the War returned to the states afterwards then got assigned to England for a year then to France for about two years.
    I am a romantic and enjoy the image of a Bridgeman carrying a rose to the ladies thus my handle. Well it may sound corny to your young fellows but bring bought up in the late forties and fifties romanticism was what many young men thought they should incorporate into their souls.

    Mar 10, 2012 at 8:39 PM


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