Japanese University To Launch New Curriculum In Wine Science

A prestigious University in Japan plans to launch a new program in wine science next year. Experts say, the move could play a key role in raising the quality of wine production in the island nation

 


Tokyo: If you are a wine enthusiast looking to join the blooming and cash-rich global wine-industry, then the University of Yamanashi in Japan is certainly one place that you can’t help but fancy. Located in one of the finest wine-making regions in the island nation, the University is currently planning to roll out a new program in wine science.

Scheduled to start from 2015, this new program will be aimed to boost the quality and export of wine by providing world-class training to people associated with the production of the alcoholic beverage. According to reports, the program will be implemented by the Institute of Enology and Viticulture wing of the University and the syllabus will include the finest details of various aspects associated with the wine industry such as harvesting of grapes and the technological components of wine production. In addition, it will also include detailed information on international laws pertaining to wine.There will be another separate section for providing guidance to sommeliers.With institutionalized backing of the Japanese Ministry of Education, the new program is likely to be introduced in April, 2015.

The University administration states that the program will be particularly helpful for people who have been producing wine or growing grapes for a minimum of two years. Industry experts are of the opinion that if everything goes as per plan, the program will help regional wine producers and marketers strengthen their stake in the international market. In the beginning, the number of students per academic course will be limited to five only.

The curriculum will include approximately 140 hours of lectures per year in addition to practical classes. The whole course will cost students around $920 (100,000 yen). "The quality of Japanese wines has definitely improved over the past few years. The key is how to market these overseas," says Fujitoshi Yanagida, the person in charge of the program, as reported by the Daisy World. "Japanese food is gaining popularity abroad, and with the knowledge of sommeliers, we can put wines on the market that pair well with that food. We want to produce people who can compete globally," Yanagida added.
 
 
 

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