Coravin

Changing how we enjoy wine or just another fancy toy?


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As for the 2008 Produttori del Barbaresco Riserva Montestefano – The nose showed an elegant intensity as a mix of rich raspberry, cranberry, rose, potpourri, exotic spice and minerals seduced the senses.  On the palate, I found dark red fruits, exotic spice, earth and tar, yet somehow there was weightlessness to this wine’s massive presence.  A balanced structure began to show toward the close and lasted through the finish.  This wine was feminine, yet massive in its layers of fruit and structure.  It should be even better in ten year’s time. (94 points)

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  • Snooth User: sigh j
    486401 17

    Very interesting article but I was quite confused by the phrase"allowing the wine to pour freely". The phrase seem to follow pressurization of the bottle with the cork in place.

    Aug 13, 2013 at 1:03 PM


  • Snooth User: Ed59
    1303866 20

    It Works!! The Founder visited me in March 2013. He inserted the Coravin into my bottle of 1982 Cos D'Estournal and we drank half of it that night, a wonderful wine. Last week I removed the cork and drank the rest of that bottle, it had not changed at all, still wonderful. He left me his bottle of 1997 Phelps Napa cab that he drank half of in 2010. I removed that cork and finished the bottle last week, fresh as a daisy!

    Aug 13, 2013 at 4:03 PM


  • More and more wines are going to screw tops, which is a better solution than a cork. Screw tops render this device useless, though.

    Aug 13, 2013 at 6:39 PM


  • Snooth User: SGD
    610727 21

    My thoughts precisely. Screw caps are now the predominant seal, so the issue persists

    Aug 13, 2013 at 7:59 PM


  • Snooth User: foodchow
    1324482 26

    but with a screw cap, whatever air entered the bottle after it's initial pour is still there. My understanding is that this process removed the air and replaces it with gas.

    Also the screw cap hasn't been around long enough to trust with expensive wines although it is fine with everyday wines.

    Aug 13, 2013 at 8:23 PM


  • Snooth User: Eric Guido
    Hand of Snooth Voice of Snooth
    92549 160,133

    Sigh j, you read that right. I know it's hard to visualize but this really does insert into the cork and extract the wine, while leaving the cork intact, to reseal itself after the needle is removed.

    John & SGD, I must agree with FoodChow here. The quality of corks continue to increase now that the industry is starting to take screw-caps seriously. The percentage of corked bottles has plummeted and I know for a fact that many of us (including me) don't want our wines in the long-term cellar to be sealed with anything other than a cork.

    Aug 13, 2013 at 8:45 PM


  • Snooth User: MiltonM
    1332240 19

    I have one I got the first week it was released. I love it! I've used it on cork and synthetics, even though they only guarantee effectiveness with real corks. So far it seems to be working fine in the synthetic but we'll see over time. My take on that issue is that for less expensive wines that use synthetic corks, if I get an extra week or two out of an accessed bottle, it's still a huge win over anything else I've tried. Clearly it's designed for more expensive wines which still predominately use real cork. I'm thinking the long term result, if Coravin turns out to be a success, is that the industry will be pushed back to cork by demand.

    Aug 15, 2013 at 9:31 PM


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