Cooking At The Creek: Interview with Chef Veronica Zahra

Wine Pairing and Recipe Tips From the Chef at Jacob's Creek













Chili Prawns paired with Moscato Rose 2012

Ingredients:
 
½ red capsicum, cut into chunks
½ green capsicum, cut into chunks
2 cloves garlic
1 white onion
2 teaspoons oil
200 grams (7 ounces) green prawns
1 tablespoon rice wine
1 tablespoon chili sauce 
¼ cup stock
1 lime
 
 
Method:
 
Fry the red capsicums, green capsicums, onions and garlic in a hot wok with the oil. Once cooked, add the prawns and cook until opaque. Pour in the rice wine then the chili sauce. Add the stock and reduce slightly. Add the lime to taste.
 
Serve with rice. 
 
 
 
Beef Ragout paired with Reserve Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon
Serves 6
 
Ingredients
 
4 slices of pancetta, diced
1 onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 tin diced tomatoes (400 grams)
1 teaspoon rosemary, finely chopped
5-7 sage leaves, chopped
1 bay leaf
700 grams shin beef, cut into cubes or a cut from the shoulder, such as blade chuck or brisket
225 grams lean pork, cut into cubes (use all beef if you prefer)
Olive oil
150 milliliters dry white wine
300 milliliters red wine
1 tablespoon flour
 
Method
 
In a large, heavy-based casserole dish, sauté the onions until soft and golden. Add the pancetta and sauté until the it renders some of its fat. Add the carrot and continue to sauté for about 3 to 4 minutes, then add the celery. Add the tomato paste and fry for a further 2 or 3 minutes.
 
Preheat the oven to 170°C (330°F). Place the diced meat in a large mixing bowl, season with salt and pepper and dust with flour. In a separate fry pan, heat a little of the olive oil and fry the meat off in batches. Add the meat to the casserole dish as you go. Deglaze the pan with the wine and pour over the top of the meat. Add tomato, rosemary, sage and bay leaf and bring to the boil on top of stove.
 
Cover with a lid and place in the preheated oven. Cook for 2 ½ hours.  
 
Serve with pasta such as pappardelle, bucatini or rigatoni.

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Comments

  • OK, what's a 'green' prawn?
    I've never had a moscato rose' but being a long time dry tavel person, you've sparked some interest to give that a try. thanx.
    Sedrick








    i

    Feb 01, 2013 at 6:23 PM


  • Snooth User: grostern
    650101 2


    Lamb pairing can be tricky. On a recent trip to Buenos Aires, I had some slow roasted lamb with some Sauvignon Blanc. Unusual pairing but was quite unreal as the sweetness of the meat blended perfectly with the citrus taste of the wine. Never be afraid to experiment.
    Mort G - Montreal Canada

    Feb 02, 2013 at 1:03 PM


  • Snooth User: Ali
    1185395 15

    Sedrick - A green prawn is a raw prawn. Not cooked yet.

    Feb 05, 2013 at 7:50 PM


  • Snooth User: BeniciaCA
    707009 68

    One of the great pairings for lamb is a classic firm red like a Tempranillo from DOCa Rioja. I prefer those wines from Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa. Look for a Reserva (1 yr in the barrel and 2 in the bottle before release) from Haro, El Ceigo, Laguardia, and Logroño. The typical price point for these wines can be in the $22 to $29 range. The Grand Reservas kept longer in the barrel and bottle (aged 2 yrs in the barrel and 3 bottle) are $15 to $20 more and of coarse some even more from the famous "bodegas".

    The Reservas and Gran Reservas represent some of the greatest values in the wine world; no other regions offer similarly aged wines at these prices. Compare an upper tier Classified French Bordeaux or upper-end (Silverado Trail, Oakville, Stags Leap AVA's etc) )Napa Valley Cab to the Spanish Wines I describe and the price value is very evident.

    This medium bodied Spanish wine, with it's well balanced (leathery aroma) raspberry and blackberry is suitable for most meats like pork and beef, but it pairs particularly well with lamb. The wine will enhance the meat's taste on the palate and will linger for the next bite.

    Ribera Del Duero also produces beautiful wines with a more international finish that is very compatible with the typical American palate.
    Mark Salazar, CS

    Mar 01, 2013 at 8:28 PM


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