Spain
 
Garnacha, Spanish for Grenache, is a wine for all seasons. So what am I doing talking about it here? Well by all seasons I mean there is a wine for every season in Spain, from light and fresh to muscular and brooding. Garnacha has proven to be a bit of a chameleon in Spain and the recommendations included below represent the biggest, baddest end of the spectrum. Packed with rich fruit, relatively supple tannins, and a soft mouthfeel, these are wines that are brimming with blackberry and jammy cherry fruit all topped with gentle notes of spice and a subtle hint of floral nuance. Perfect for the deep and complex flavors of your favorite winter stews!
 
10-20-30
 
 
Washington
 
Syrah, oh lonely, forlorn Syrah. How we miss you. The real Syrah, that gamy, wiry wine that fleetingly smells of fruit before you are assaulted by the perfumes of crushed rocks, bacon, black pepper and flowers. A savory wine, one whose flavors often seem ill suited to it’s structure. Medium bodied, medium tannins, focused and sapid. Syrah is a wine whose time has come, and gone. It’s a wine increasingly made in a rather anonymous, jammy, over-ripe style in an effort to conceal it’s true identity but when made well, watch, out. That red fruit followed by boysenberries can catch you by surprise. And the balance of a great Syrah, challenging yet easy in a way. Well it reminds me of those first moments when learning to ride a bike. Right before you crash into the wall. That moment of clarity when you think to yourself: “I’ve got this, this is easy”. That is Syrah, easy yet somehow dangerous and many of us seem to know this. Shying away from the danger even though the Syrah comes fully equipped with training wheels and is no more dangerous than a Big Wheel. This winter let’s revisit Syrah. Ditch the training wheels and live dangerously. Wrap a pork loin in bacon, douse it in a black pepper infused wine reduction and dig in to the meaty goodness of these outstanding examples!
 
10-20-30